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Lt. Col. (Dr.) Paul Doan, chief of aerospace medicine for the 379th Expeditionary Medical Group in Southwest Asia, evaluates Roberto Leal. Dr. Doan is a former war refugee from Vietnam. He is deployed from Barksdale Air Force Base, La. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Joshua Strang) 

Surviving Vietnam War steered doctor to save lives
He was only 6 years old when he saw a dead Soldier lying in the street holding a rifle up in the air. He couldn't tell whether the man was American or Vietnamese because the body was burned. "During the Tet Offensive of 1968, our house was damaged from explosives," said Lt. Col. (Dr.) Paul Doan of the 379th Expeditionary Medical Group. "We had to
0 5/10
2006
Lt. Col. Andrew "A.J." Bossard has his photo taken for the Pearl S. Buck Foundation in the 1970s. Of the identification on his jacket, he said, "I'll never forget that number." (Courtesy photo)
Air Force officer teaches at Korean Air University
"They have too much freedom," was Andrew "A.J." Bossard's first thought about the United States. That was 35 years ago when, as a 14-year-old, he was adopted by an American couple in Pennsylvania. Today, Lt. Col. Bossard has spent 17 years in uniform, defending the freedoms he once thought were excessive. He also is serving in the country from
0 5/04
2006
Nina and Master Sgt. Don Taylor take part in a retreat in Hunt, Texas, on April 22, 2006, that helps couples reconnect after the military spouse returns from a deployment. The couple, from Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., attended the retreat April 20 to 27 hosted by the Military, Veteran and Family Assistance Foundation. (U.S. Air Force photo/Louis A. Arana-Barradas) 
Retreat comes right on time for Seymour Johnson couple
Nina Taylor tears up each time she thinks of her husband leaving. And then the uncontrollable sobs come. But she can’t help it. Because after three years of marriage, she still isn’t used to the idea of him just packing up and deploying to some desert base for four to six months -- and leaving her alone. He’s already done that twice. It’s not that
0 5/01
2006
Master Sgt. Terry Stayton looks at a photo of himself from 1986, when aircraft from Royal Air Force Lakenheath destroyed military targets in Libya. He was a senior airman then. He is now an aerospace ground equipment production supervisor with the 48th Equipment Maintenance Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Michael Hess) High alert in 1986
“In peace, we train for war and don’t you forget it,” was the inscription lettered on the base’s main gate while Col. Sam Westbrook was commander of the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing here in 1986. Times were different. The Berlin Wall separated Germany and a hammer and sickle flag flew over the Kremlin in Moscow. Magazines rated the Galaxy Club at
0 4/28
2006
Default Air Force Logo Doolittle Raider looks back on turning point in U.S. history
It was early 1942, and it hadn't been long since Japan threw the United States into the vortex of World War II with their attack on Pearl Harbor -- or the day when 2nd Lt. Thomas Griffin stood up at the University of Alabama and swore to defend his country against all enemies, foreign and domestic. As an Army Air Corps 17th Bomb Group navigator in
0 4/20
2006
Retired Lt. Col. Dick Cole, now 90 years old, was one of 80 men, led by then Lt. Col. James Doolittle, who volunteered to bomb mainland Japan on April 18, 1942.  Colonels Cole and Doolittle were the pilots of the first of 16 B-25 Mitchell medium bombers that launched from the USS Hornet, floating approximately 500 miles from Japan's coast.  The mission was the first American strike on the Japanese mainland.  Only 16 of the original 80 men remain alive today. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Brian Ferguson) Doolittle Raider remembers historic mission over Japan
The infamous bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, led a shock wave of other attacks by Japan on Pacific islands. With each of Japan’s successes in the following months, America’s spirit sank lower. Like the rest of America, retired Air Force Lt. Col. Richard Cole was angry. At the time, the lieutenant was assigned to the 17th Bombardment Group,
0 4/19
2006
Senior Master Sgt. Rocky Hart inspects his Airmen during an open ranks inspection Sunday,  April 2, 2006. Sergeant Hart is the first sergeant for the 83rd Aerial Port Squadron in Portland, Ore. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Ruby Zarzyczny) 
First sergeant has heart
“It’s good enough” is not a phrase Senior Master Sgt. Rocky Hart, first sergeant for the 83rd Aerial Port Squadron in Portland, Ore., wants to hear when it comes to his Airmen. “When someone says something like 'It’s good enough for government work,' it fires me up,” Sergeant Hart said. “My troops deserve the best, and I’m going to do everything I
0 4/13
2006
Sailors aboard the USS Ronald Reagan help Staff Sgt. Melissa Koskovich steer the ship 30 degrees to starboard during an orientation tour Thursday, March 30, 2006. Ten Airmen from Southwest Asia came aboard the ship for a two-day visit aimed at fostering joint relations throughout the area of operations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Bruce Morrow) Same fight by land or sea
My stomach turned under the negative Gs as we fell from the sky.  The jolt of the aircraft hitting the carrier deck ended this sensation, and seconds later, the cargo hatch opened.  Sun rays cut through the darkness in the tin can-like cabin and silhouettes in brightly colored shirts emerged from the smoke rising from the ramp.  One thing was
0 4/12
2006
Jia Xiudong, representing the Chinese Embassy in Washington, D.C., reads a letter from Huang Renzhun during memorial services for 2nd Lt. Robert Hoyle Upchurch on Saturday, April 8, 2006.  Lieutenant Upchurch was a member of the famed Flying Tigers during World War II and was listed as missing in action until his remains were identified last May by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command.  In his letter, Mr. Huang tells how, as a young boy, he remembered the body of an American pilot being recovered and given a ceremonial burial in the village of Guidong, Hunan Province.  The villagers maintained the burial site more than 60 years until Lieutenant Upchurch's remains were returned to the U.S.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Jack Braden) Pilot burial solves two mysteries
It’s not every day delegates from China attend a lieutenant’s funeral in North Carolina, or that four A-10 Thunderbolt IIs fly overhead in a missing-man formation, or 300 people show up without having ever met the Air Force pilot. Even a congressman made an appearance. But 2nd Lt. Robert Upchurch wasn’t just any pilot. Although his death remained a
0 4/11
2006
Staff Sgt. Kent Roberts and two workers struggle in the mud to repalce a screw that broke from the combine during harvesting. The muddy conditions are part of the business in south Louisiana. As soon as the part is replaced, Sergeant Roberts gets back in the combine and continues harvesting. He is a reservist with the 926th Fighter Wings at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Chance Babin) Reservist, his family find sweet success raisin' cane
As the sun rises deep in the heart of Cajun country, the sound of farm equipment roars across a muddy sugar cane field. Hard rain from the night before made the field a sloppy mess, making it extremely difficult to walk, much less harvest the crop. But there’s work to do, and it’s time to get busy. Over their truck and tractor radios, workers
0 4/06
2006
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