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Katie and Travis Alton hold their twins, Jenson and Ally, June 25, 2013. at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. The family travelled from Yokota Air Base, Japan, to Okinawa, Japan, to Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii to Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., to receive better treatment for their premature babies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Regina Agoha) Premature birth sends family, newborns around the world
Having children for the first time can be one of the most exciting moments in a couple's life. Giving birth to twins in a foreign country, more than three months early, was not the excitement Airman 1st Class Travis Alton and his wife, Katie, said they were expecting. "I was 24 weeks pregnant," Katie said. "When we came home from grocery shopping
0 7/09
2013
Mohammad Golabi, University of Guam associate professor of soil and environmental sciences, and a research technician turn compost June 19, 2013, at the UOG Research Farm in Yigo, Guam. The professor, technicians and students collected nearly 250 cubic yards of mulch from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, throughout the year for a project that will benefit the local agriculture community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Melissa B.  White/Released) Andersen AFB aids research, helps students turn mulch into master's degrees
Members of the 36th Civil Engineer Squadron Environmental Flight have been aiding a team at the University of Guam with a research project this year, strengthening the base's community ties from the ground up with something as simple as mulch.Mohammad Golabi, a UOG associate professor of soil and environmental sciences, first reached out to the
0 6/27
2013
Tech. Sgt. Thomas Capaldo inserts test tubes into a device that conducts a sulfur analysis on fuels in the 379th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron Air Force Petroleum Laboratory in Southwest Asia, June 12, 2013. This test is one of 15 conducted to ensure the quality of fuels used on aircraft throughout the area of responsibility. Capaldo is the 379th ELRS AFPA NCO in charge of fuels deployed from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Bahja J. Jones) Petroleum agency lab supports safe missions
Aircrew members depend on several moving parts to ensure an aircraft is properly maintained and prepped for a safe mission. A part of this preparation is ensuring that the fuel and oxygen within the aircraft are safe and free of contaminates that could negatively affect the mission. Airman at the the 379th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron
0 6/22
2013
Staff Sgt. Aaron Gerasch scans blood bags into a computer-based tracking system at the 379th Air Expeditionary Wing’s Blood Transshipment Center in Southwest Asia, June 13, 2013. The BTC is responsible for receiving and distributing blood products to locations throughout the area of responsibility. Gerasch is the 379th Expeditionary Medical Support Squadron BTC NCO in charge deployed from Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Bahja J. Jones) Logistics Airmen provide battlefield medics with life-saving supplies
Forward-deployed medical professionals are limited to the supplies they have on-hand to provide immediate care to casualties prior to medical evacuation. They are dependent on regular shipments of blood, plasma, cryoprecipitate and dry ice provided by the 379th Expeditionary Medical Group blood transshipment center, or BTC. "Within seven days of
0 6/21
2013
Airman 1st Class Everardo Torres and Melissa Newton, 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron Fly-Away Security Team members, react to an intruder during a hostile training scenario at Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, June 16, 2013. FAST members are required to fly on specific missions when a location requires an extra measure of security to ensure the aircraft and crew are protected from hostile fire or on-board security breaches. Torres hails from Dallas, Texas, and Newton hails from Big Rock, Iowa. Both are deployed from Davis-Monthan, Ariz.
(USAF Photo/Master Sgt. Ben Bloker) Fly-away security teams stay vigilant for mission-critical assets
Rifle at the ready, eyes watchful and wary, sweat beads form on their brows and trickle down their chins, exhaust fumes and gritty sand fills their noses, words can barely be heard over the whine of engines, yet the Airmen of the 455th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron's Fly-Away Security Teams maintain a constant vigil over the aircraft,
0 6/18
2013
Staff Sgt. Samuel Lerman (right), 459th Security Forces Squadron, poses for a photo with Safiullah, an Afghan contractor, during a 2011 deployment to Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan. Lerman utilized Self-Aid-And-Buddy-Care training he received at Joint Base Andrews, Md., to help save Safiullah's life following a rocket attack during his deployment. After healing from his wounds, Safiullah returned to work shortly before Lerman completed his Afghanistan tour. (Submitted photo) Through Airmen's Eyes: Security forces member uses training, saves lives while deployed
(This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series on AF.mil. These stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story.) It was the day before the anniversary of Sept. 11 in 2011, when Staff Sgt. Samuel Lerman assumed his post for another 14-hour shift during his six-month deployment to Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan. On
0 6/02
2013
United States Air Force Capt. Derandoria Young (right of center),49th Medical Operations Squadron, poses with Ghana students and staff during her studies abroad in Ghana, Africa, in 2010. Sponsored by the University of Texas School of Social Work, the Maymester Abroad Course provided 61 students the opportunity to broaden their educational horizons. (photo courtesy of Capt. Derandoria Young/Released) Through Airmen's Eyes: Airman makes most of AF educational opportunities
(This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series on AF.mil. These stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story.)Airmen have different reasons for answering the call to defend our nation. Some join to travel the world. Some join to honor a legacy. There are some who join to better themselves, and in the process,
0 5/30
2013
(Left to Right) Airman 1st Class Mark Armstrong, Staff Sgt. Keith Billings and Senior Airman Garron Theriault, 455th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron egress technicians, remove an Advanced Concept Ejection System from an A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, May 17, 2013. Egress technicians are responsible for all the components involved with the pilot’s ejection system. The A-10 is a specialized ground-attack aircraft which provides close air support to ground forces operating in Afghanistan. Armstrong, Billings and Theriault are all deployed from Moody Air Force Base, Ga. ( U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt/ Stephenie Wade) When all else fails, egress prevails
The ejection seat is the pilot's last option if something doesn't go according to plan. If it wasn't for a small group of specially-trained Airmen, pilots wouldn't be able to resort to this life-saving option. Deployed from Moody Air Force Base, Ga., Staff Sgt. Keith Billings, Senior Airman Garron Theriault and Airman 1st Class Mark Armstrong work
0 5/21
2013
Airman 1st Class Phonchai Hansen, 8th Air Support Operations Squadron tactical air control party member, inputs a radio frequency to talk to the Slovenian pilots before a training mission April 19, 2013, at a training range in Pocek, Slovenia. U.S. Air Force TACPs train with other allied countries to help maintain proficiency with cutting-edge technology, including communications, computers, digital networks, targeting and surveillance equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Matthew Lotz) Air liaison controls sky, saves lives
The lieutenant lowered a tactical vest over his head with practiced confidence; his face displayed the cool composure born of constant training. As he straps on his helmet, an aircraft circles overhead, preparing for the first strike of the day. Minutes later, ordnance begins raining down at the officer's command.First Lt. Patrick Bonner and his
0 5/13
2013
Cadet 1st Class Victoria Cachro talks biosand water filter workshop attendees through filtering sand using a homemade sieve March 25 in Dondo, Mozambique. Cachro and three other cadets traveled to Mozambique to offer a method of building biosand water filters that can be made using materials common in the country. (U.S. Air Force photo) Cadets teach biosand water filtration efforts in Mozambique
Americans take drinking water for granted. We use it not only to drink and to cook but to water our plants, to bathe and even to flush our toilets.In other parts of the world, however, potable water is hard to come by. Without the infrastructure to treat and distribute water through plumbing, people are more likely to drink water straight from
0 5/06
2013
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