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(Left to Right) Airman 1st Class Mark Armstrong, Staff Sgt. Keith Billings and Senior Airman Garron Theriault, 455th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron egress technicians, remove an Advanced Concept Ejection System from an A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, May 17, 2013. Egress technicians are responsible for all the components involved with the pilot’s ejection system. The A-10 is a specialized ground-attack aircraft which provides close air support to ground forces operating in Afghanistan. Armstrong, Billings and Theriault are all deployed from Moody Air Force Base, Ga. ( U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt/ Stephenie Wade) When all else fails, egress prevails
The ejection seat is the pilot's last option if something doesn't go according to plan. If it wasn't for a small group of specially-trained Airmen, pilots wouldn't be able to resort to this life-saving option. Deployed from Moody Air Force Base, Ga., Staff Sgt. Keith Billings, Senior Airman Garron Theriault and Airman 1st Class Mark Armstrong work
0 5/21
2013
Airman 1st Class Phonchai Hansen, 8th Air Support Operations Squadron tactical air control party member, inputs a radio frequency to talk to the Slovenian pilots before a training mission April 19, 2013, at a training range in Pocek, Slovenia. U.S. Air Force TACPs train with other allied countries to help maintain proficiency with cutting-edge technology, including communications, computers, digital networks, targeting and surveillance equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Matthew Lotz) Air liaison controls sky, saves lives
The lieutenant lowered a tactical vest over his head with practiced confidence; his face displayed the cool composure born of constant training. As he straps on his helmet, an aircraft circles overhead, preparing for the first strike of the day. Minutes later, ordnance begins raining down at the officer's command.First Lt. Patrick Bonner and his
0 5/13
2013
Cadet 1st Class Victoria Cachro talks biosand water filter workshop attendees through filtering sand using a homemade sieve March 25 in Dondo, Mozambique. Cachro and three other cadets traveled to Mozambique to offer a method of building biosand water filters that can be made using materials common in the country. (U.S. Air Force photo) Cadets teach biosand water filtration efforts in Mozambique
Americans take drinking water for granted. We use it not only to drink and to cook but to water our plants, to bathe and even to flush our toilets.In other parts of the world, however, potable water is hard to come by. Without the infrastructure to treat and distribute water through plumbing, people are more likely to drink water straight from
0 5/06
2013
U.S. Air Force Capt. Neal Miest, 961st Airborne Air Control Squadron contingency flight commander and senior director, looks across the cabin of an E-3 Sentry Airborne Warning and Control System aircraft before takeoff on Kadena Air Base, Japan, April 18, 2013. Without the ability AWACS provide to perform air battle management, or comprehensive visibility and direction of practically all aircraft in the surveyed region, other airborne assets would be virtually blind to other aircraft in a skyward battle. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Maeson L. Elleman/Released) Sentry operators keep 'eyes in the sky'
In the quiet darkness surrounding the flightline here, the awaiting aircraft roars to life with an escalated screech, and cool air rushes to fill the newly-lit cabin.As the chill meets the lingering humid air within the aircraft, a smoke-like fog diffuses into the nooks and crevices around the computer stations and throughout the cockpit. While it
0 5/01
2013
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class William Densford, 380th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron random access measures team member, plays an intruder attempting to infiltrate the installation during a demonstration of the Tactical Automated Security System (TASS) at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia Mar. 20, 2013. TASS is a collection of equipment, using different technologies, designed to secure multiple perimeters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Christina M. Styer/Released)  System provides 24/7 perimeter security
Motion detection, night-vision cameras and sensor zones may bring an action movie to mind, but they are also a few of the pieces that make up a Tactical Automated Security System.TASS is an intrusion detection system used to protect the perimeter and resources at the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing. "TASS uses different technologies and equipment to
0 4/16
2013
Staff Sgt. Patrick Harrington, 320th Special Tactics Squadron, works out in the Human Performance Training Center, during squadron physical training March 22 at Kadena Air Base.  The HPTC houses the human performance program, which focuses on not only strengthening the battlefield Airman physically, but also rehabilitating the individual ensuring the Air Force’s human weapons system is performing to its maximum potential for as long as possible. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Kristine Dreyer) Performance program strengthens battlefield Airmen
"Humans are more important than hardware" is a saying heard continuously throughout the special operations community. One special tactics squadron has a facility that turns these words into action.The 320th Special Tactics Squadron's Human Performance Training Center here offers battlefield Airmen an opportunity to ensure they remain mission-ready.
0 4/14
2013
Tech. Sgt. Chi Yi, Military Training Instructor at Officer Training Shool here, demonstrates proper facing movements for new OTS trainees Feb 28. Yi has been an MTI for more than four years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sandra Percival) Military training instructors shape next generation of officers
Dating back to September 1947, Air Force military training instructors have represented one of the most visible special-duty career fields in the service. From the original group of "flight marchers" to today's MTIs, the need to train new Airmen has remained constant. Today, 500 Airmen in the grades of staff sergeant through master sergeant work
0 4/11
2013
Tech. Sgt. Justin Longway, 41st Expeditionary Electronic Combat Squadron airborne maintenance technician, checks a patch panel aboard an EC-130 Compass Call aircraft on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, March 23, 2013. The 41st EECS flies nightly missions in support of troops on the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. David Dobrydney) 'Compass Call'ing: Are you listening?
Even high in the air, they have their ears close to the ground.Linguists from the 41st Expeditionary Electronic Combat Squadron, are trained in the art of employing electronic attack for the purpose of denying, degrading and disrupting enemy communications from aboard the EC-130 Compass Call."We're a precision electronic attack platform," said
0 4/08
2013
After receiving paperwork putting him back in flying status, Senior Airman Justus Bosquez took his first flight as an amputee March 25. The Airman, an E-3 air surveillance technician with the 965th Airborne Air Control Squadron, had his left leg amputated after a hit-and-run motorcycle accident in June 2011. (Courtesy photo) Airman returns to flying status after having part of leg amputated
When Senior Airman Justus Bosquez walks down a narrow hallway in his airman battle uniform, he looks no different than his peers. Like many of them, he can do salsa, merengue and two-step dances. He can run a marathon wearing a 30-pound rucksack and he can perform his flying duties on an E-3 Sentry. The difference is he doesn't take those tasks for
0 4/08
2013
Col. Michelle Barrett (right) sings vocal warm-ups with The Excel Quartet of the Vienna-Falls Chorus of Fairfax, Va April 2, 2013. The quartet sings in the bathroom to take advantage of the great acoustics. The Excel quartet is the rookie quartet of the VF Chorus. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Carlin Leslie) Air Force Reserve colonel hits high notes in traveling quartet
By the time Air Force Reserve Col. Michelle Barrett attended her first barbershop singing performance, she didn't even realize women had long since made their mark in the genre.Four years ago, the Reserve Advisor to the deputy assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Reserve Affairs attended a performance by the Alexandria Harmonizers, a
0 4/06
2013
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