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Members of the of the 455th Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron assist patients on a C-17 Globemaster III medical transport flight out of Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, March 21, 2013. With help from the Critical Care Air Transport Team, the crew can turn a regular medical transport aircraft into a flying intensive care unit, making it possible to move severely injured or gravely ill servicemembers by air. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Chris Willis) After The Battle: The flying ICU
Three critically injured patients need immediate transfer to a medical facility outside of Afghanistan. One has a shot to the head, the other has missing limbs and the last has an open abdominal wound. Without a mobile intensive care unit, these patients will not make the flight out.For members of the 455th Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation
0 3/29
2013
SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Vikki Traugot benches during a November, U.S. Powerlifting Association competition. Traugot is a top rated woman powerlifter in the nation and is the spouse of Air National Guard Senior Master Sgt. Andrew Traugot at the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center. (National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Andrew Traugot) Air Guard spouse sets bar as national powerlifter
Knees tightly bandaged and a thick weightlifting belt bracing her waist, she lowers herself into a tense squat.The weight on her shoulder equals almost three times her own body weight, but she is not giving up.Holding her breath and tightening every muscle, she struggles against gravity to put the weight back on the rack.At age 50, the spouse of
0 3/19
2013
Capt. Brandon Davenport, U.S. Air Forces Central Command Combined Air and Space Operations Center Combat Operations Division Space Cell chief, diagrams how to geolocate a jamming signal at a deployed location in Southwest Asia, Feb. 28. Jamming is the denial, whether intentional or accidental, of a satellite's ability to communicate by overwhelming it with another signal. Geolocating allows coalition forces to reliably attribute the source of the jamming signal and help prevent it from happening again. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Mike Andriacco) Combat Ops Space Cell: Defending critical satellite links
More than 22,000 miles away, spinning silently through the vacuum of space, is one of the most critical components to air, space and cyberspace superiority today; a satellite.The mission to defend and protect the operability of that satellite rests a little closer to home, at the U.S. Air Forces Central Command Combined Air and Space Operations
0 3/07
2013
Tricia Heller speaks at the Air Force Academy's National Character and Leadership Symposium Feb. 22, 2013. Heller is the executive director of Blue Alliance, a support group for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Academy alumni. The Spectrum cadet club provides support for present-day cadets who consider themselves gay, lesbian, bisexual or questioning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Liz Copan) LGBT leader supports cadets in overcoming adversity
For one U.S. Air Force Academy graduate and leader within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, the Air Force core values were a source of sustainment while she balanced her Air Force career with her sexual orientation prior to "don't ask, don't tell.""Be true to yourself and be true with yourself to others," said Tricia Heller, a
0 3/07
2013
Participants in the Afghan Trauma Mentorship Program take a tour of the Craig Joint Theater Hospital laboratory on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Feb. 16, 2013. The program invites Afghan doctors and nurses to learn about the latest medical techniques and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. David Dobrydney) Afghan medics train at Bagram
Even in the midst of conflict, it is important to keep an eye toward the future.To that end, the staff members at Craig Joint Theater Hospital here have trained more than 40 Afghan doctors and nurses as part of the Afghan Trauma Mentorship Program."The goal is to train Afghan health care providers to be able to operate using the latest technology
0 3/04
2013
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Christofer Curtis, a CV-22 flight engineer of the 8th Special Operations Squadron, and his family meet Gary Sinise after the Lt. Dan Band performed a concert for Hurlburt Airmen, family and guests on the flight line at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Feb. 9, 2013. Curtis had previously met Sinise in the hospital while Curtis recovered from injuries sustained during a deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Naomi M. Griego) Airman revisits recovery with Lt. Dan
Lt. Dan, as Forrest Gump film actor Gary Sinise is affectionately known, may not actually be a member of the military, but he treats each service member he meets with the deep-seated respect that should be given to a brother-in-arms. For Hurlburt Field's Tech. Sgt. Christofer Curtis, a CV-22 flight engineer of 8th Special Operations Squadron,
0 3/04
2013
Retired Col. Lee Ellis, a prisoner of war who spent five and a half years in the "Hanoi Hilton" during the Vietnam War, spoke at the Air Force Academy's National Character and Leadership Symposium Feb. 21-22, 2013. (courtesy photo) POW recalls 'hidden treasure' in lessons learned
A prisoner of war held in the "Hanoi Hilton" for five and a half years shared his compelling story of imprisonment and success with U.S. Air  cadets Feb. 21-22 during the 2013 National Character and Leadership Symposium here.Like Sen. John McCain and others, retired Col. Lee Ellis was held captive after his plane was shot down Nov. 7, 1967.Ellis
0 2/25
2013
Airmen got a chance to show off their hard work and dedication to fitness as they participated in a bodybuilding competition at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Feb. 16, 2013. The competition was open to all servicemembers and civilians located on BAF.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Chris Willis) Bagram bodybuilders push it to the limit
Bodybuilding is not a sprint, it's a marathon.Airmen got a chance to show off their hard work and dedication to fitness as they participated in a bodybuilding competition open to all service members and civilians on Bagram Airfield.The arena was packed with spectators as the bodybuilders prepared backstage, oiling up and getting pumped to entertain
0 2/25
2013
APIAY AIR BASE, Colombia -- Tech. Sgt. Adrian Jackson, 204th Military Intelligence Battalion weather operator from Charleston, S.C., gets transported by an Army helicopter during his deployment to Apiay Air Base, Colombia. Jackson is a member of the 52nd Fighter Wing weather flight at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany. He volunteered to deploy and is supporting the battalion as they work with Colombian forces to conduct reconnaissance and surveillance missions against the war on terrorism and drugs. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo/Released) Welcome to the jungle: forecaster supports counterdrug operations
He didn't know where it was to or what it was for, but when Charleston, S.C., native Tech. Sgt. Adrian Jackson heard about a short-notice tasking to deploy, he volunteered immediately.Jackson volunteered he having only been on-station two months."Because he was new to base, he was ineligible to deploy for six months, however he wanted to go, so he
0 2/22
2013
Cadet 1st Class Alexa Gingras prepares a lysogeny broth during her biochemistry lab Feb. 13, 2013. The broth is used to grow bacteria, which Gingras uses to produce fluorescent proteins for her research, which involves getting fluorescent proteins to react to illegal drugs. Gingras is a native of Tucson, Ariz. (U.S. Air Force photo/Don Branum) Cadet's research aims to bust spice users
A senior cadet's summer research, which earned her recognition from Air Force Chief Scientist Dr. Mark Maybury at an awards ceremony Feb. 1, will help catch users of spice and similar products several weeks after they've ingested the substance.Cadet 1st Class Alexa Gingras, working with two doctors at the Air Force Drug Testing Laboratory at Joint
0 2/20
2013
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