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Tech. Sgt. Chi Yi, Military Training Instructor at Officer Training Shool here, demonstrates proper facing movements for new OTS trainees Feb 28. Yi has been an MTI for more than four years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Sandra Percival) Military training instructors shape next generation of officers
Dating back to September 1947, Air Force military training instructors have represented one of the most visible special-duty career fields in the service. From the original group of "flight marchers" to today's MTIs, the need to train new Airmen has remained constant. Today, 500 Airmen in the grades of staff sergeant through master sergeant work
0 4/11
2013
Tech. Sgt. Justin Longway, 41st Expeditionary Electronic Combat Squadron airborne maintenance technician, checks a patch panel aboard an EC-130 Compass Call aircraft on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, March 23, 2013. The 41st EECS flies nightly missions in support of troops on the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. David Dobrydney) 'Compass Call'ing: Are you listening?
Even high in the air, they have their ears close to the ground.Linguists from the 41st Expeditionary Electronic Combat Squadron, are trained in the art of employing electronic attack for the purpose of denying, degrading and disrupting enemy communications from aboard the EC-130 Compass Call."We're a precision electronic attack platform," said
0 4/08
2013
After receiving paperwork putting him back in flying status, Senior Airman Justus Bosquez took his first flight as an amputee March 25. The Airman, an E-3 air surveillance technician with the 965th Airborne Air Control Squadron, had his left leg amputated after a hit-and-run motorcycle accident in June 2011. (Courtesy photo) Airman returns to flying status after having part of leg amputated
When Senior Airman Justus Bosquez walks down a narrow hallway in his airman battle uniform, he looks no different than his peers. Like many of them, he can do salsa, merengue and two-step dances. He can run a marathon wearing a 30-pound rucksack and he can perform his flying duties on an E-3 Sentry. The difference is he doesn't take those tasks for
0 4/08
2013
Col. Michelle Barrett (right) sings vocal warm-ups with The Excel Quartet of the Vienna-Falls Chorus of Fairfax, Va April 2, 2013. The quartet sings in the bathroom to take advantage of the great acoustics. The Excel quartet is the rookie quartet of the VF Chorus. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Carlin Leslie) Air Force Reserve colonel hits high notes in traveling quartet
By the time Air Force Reserve Col. Michelle Barrett attended her first barbershop singing performance, she didn't even realize women had long since made their mark in the genre.Four years ago, the Reserve Advisor to the deputy assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Reserve Affairs attended a performance by the Alexandria Harmonizers, a
0 4/06
2013
Members of the of the 455th Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron assist patients on a C-17 Globemaster III medical transport flight out of Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, March 21, 2013. With help from the Critical Care Air Transport Team, the crew can turn a regular medical transport aircraft into a flying intensive care unit, making it possible to move severely injured or gravely ill servicemembers by air. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Chris Willis) After The Battle: The flying ICU
Three critically injured patients need immediate transfer to a medical facility outside of Afghanistan. One has a shot to the head, the other has missing limbs and the last has an open abdominal wound. Without a mobile intensive care unit, these patients will not make the flight out.For members of the 455th Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation
0 3/29
2013
SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Vikki Traugot benches during a November, U.S. Powerlifting Association competition. Traugot is a top rated woman powerlifter in the nation and is the spouse of Air National Guard Senior Master Sgt. Andrew Traugot at the I.G. Brown Training and Education Center. (National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Andrew Traugot) Air Guard spouse sets bar as national powerlifter
Knees tightly bandaged and a thick weightlifting belt bracing her waist, she lowers herself into a tense squat.The weight on her shoulder equals almost three times her own body weight, but she is not giving up.Holding her breath and tightening every muscle, she struggles against gravity to put the weight back on the rack.At age 50, the spouse of
0 3/19
2013
Capt. Brandon Davenport, U.S. Air Forces Central Command Combined Air and Space Operations Center Combat Operations Division Space Cell chief, diagrams how to geolocate a jamming signal at a deployed location in Southwest Asia, Feb. 28. Jamming is the denial, whether intentional or accidental, of a satellite's ability to communicate by overwhelming it with another signal. Geolocating allows coalition forces to reliably attribute the source of the jamming signal and help prevent it from happening again. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Mike Andriacco) Combat Ops Space Cell: Defending critical satellite links
More than 22,000 miles away, spinning silently through the vacuum of space, is one of the most critical components to air, space and cyberspace superiority today; a satellite.The mission to defend and protect the operability of that satellite rests a little closer to home, at the U.S. Air Forces Central Command Combined Air and Space Operations
0 3/07
2013
Tricia Heller speaks at the Air Force Academy's National Character and Leadership Symposium Feb. 22, 2013. Heller is the executive director of Blue Alliance, a support group for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Academy alumni. The Spectrum cadet club provides support for present-day cadets who consider themselves gay, lesbian, bisexual or questioning. (U.S. Air Force photo/Liz Copan) LGBT leader supports cadets in overcoming adversity
For one U.S. Air Force Academy graduate and leader within the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community, the Air Force core values were a source of sustainment while she balanced her Air Force career with her sexual orientation prior to "don't ask, don't tell.""Be true to yourself and be true with yourself to others," said Tricia Heller, a
0 3/07
2013
Participants in the Afghan Trauma Mentorship Program take a tour of the Craig Joint Theater Hospital laboratory on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Feb. 16, 2013. The program invites Afghan doctors and nurses to learn about the latest medical techniques and equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. David Dobrydney) Afghan medics train at Bagram
Even in the midst of conflict, it is important to keep an eye toward the future.To that end, the staff members at Craig Joint Theater Hospital here have trained more than 40 Afghan doctors and nurses as part of the Afghan Trauma Mentorship Program."The goal is to train Afghan health care providers to be able to operate using the latest technology
0 3/04
2013
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Christofer Curtis, a CV-22 flight engineer of the 8th Special Operations Squadron, and his family meet Gary Sinise after the Lt. Dan Band performed a concert for Hurlburt Airmen, family and guests on the flight line at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Feb. 9, 2013. Curtis had previously met Sinise in the hospital while Curtis recovered from injuries sustained during a deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Naomi M. Griego) Airman revisits recovery with Lt. Dan
Lt. Dan, as Forrest Gump film actor Gary Sinise is affectionately known, may not actually be a member of the military, but he treats each service member he meets with the deep-seated respect that should be given to a brother-in-arms. For Hurlburt Field's Tech. Sgt. Christofer Curtis, a CV-22 flight engineer of 8th Special Operations Squadron,
0 3/04
2013
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