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The mission of the 446th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight is to reduce or eliminate conventional ordnance, improvised explosive devices, and chemical, biological and nuclear threats to personnel and property. It is a crucial mission with room for more. Currently, the EOD team has positions available for four dedicated Reservists. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Madelyn McCullough) Focus under fire: EOD keeps troops safe
In the mountains of Afghanistan, embedded with Soldiers, an Airman works to remove an improvised explosive device from the side of the road. While trying to concentrate, his group comes under fire, forcing him to fire back as he continues his task. Somehow, despite the pressure he is under, he is able to think clearly enough to remove the explosive
0 1/15
2013
An E-3 Sentry moves to within 50 feet of a KC-135 from the 507 ARW recently as the two planes prepare for an aerial refueling over the cloudy skies of St. Louis.  Highly-skilled dance performed at 25,000 feet
When most people think about skillful dancing, the thought of a couple moving gracefully across a dance floor comes to mind. If you are part of the KC-135 Stratotanker refueling crew, you're probably picturing two planes less than 50 feet apart bouncing around at 25,000 feet while trying to connect a refueling boom into what appears to be a golf
0 1/10
2013
U.S. Air Forces Central Band "Total Force" gathers their gear Dec. 18, 2012, at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. This was the first stop on the band's tour throughout Afghanistan, playing for U.S. and coalition service members. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Jonathan Snyder) Total Force: Behind the music
(Editor's Note: This is the second article in a series about the U.S. Air Forces Central Band, the only assigned Air Force Band to the Central Command Area of Responsibility. Based in Southwest Asia, the current band "Total Force" is comprised of deployed Airmen from the Band of the U.S. Air Force Reserve.)At the sound of the first few notes on the
0 1/03
2013
920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron Commander, Col. (Dr.) Lewis D. Neace becomes life-saver during commercial flights to and from Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., where he performs his Reserve duty. (Courtesy photo) Airman saves lives during round-trip flights
A Reservist assigned to the 920th Rescue Wing here found himself in not one, but two life-saving situations during flights to and from his November unit training assembly . Col. (Dr.) Lewis D. Neace, the 920th Aeromedical Staging Squadron commander, was called to action during the flight from Portland, Ore., Nov. 1. About an hour after takeoff, a
0 12/27
2012
Master Sgt. Bryan Kiele, left, an Afghan avionics advisor with the 440th Air Expeditionary Advisory Squadron, poses with a U.S. flag at Kabul, Afghanistan, International Airport, Dec. 11, 2012 while his son, Airman 1st Class Tyler Kiele, a fuels journeyman with the 379th Expeditionary Logistics Readiness Squadron, poses with the same flag Dec. 18, 2012 at an air base in Southwest Asia. Sergeant Kiele has kept the flag with him on five deployments. This is his last deployment, during which he passed the flag off to his son, who is on his first deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Tech. Sgt. Dennis J. Henry Jr.) U.S. flag strengthens bond of Air Force father, son while deployed
A simple U.S. flag. It's traveled thousands of miles, seen numerous deployments -- six to be exact -- and one stint at Air Force basic military training. Even today, it's still traveling, looking dusty and dull from all of its miles and years. But for one Air Force father and son duo, it's more than just a simple U.S. flag; it's their symbol of
0 12/27
2012
SOUTHWEST ASIA -- U.S. Air Force members assigned to the 560th RED HORSE Squadron lay the concrete foundation for a two-story, concrete-block facility that will be utilized for improved workspace for flying squadrons Dec. 4, 2012. RED HORSE is comprised of specialized Airmen in 21 trades who deploy to austere and existing bases to build new facilities. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Christina M. Styer) (RELEASED) Self-sustaining unit builds improvements
Throughout the Air Force, units depend on each other to successfully complete the mission. For example, without supply, maintainers wouldn't have the parts needed to make repairs. Very few units can function independent of other support elements. Here at the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing, there is one unit that can - the 577th Expeditionary RED
0 12/16
2012
MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D.-- The 5th Security Forces Squadron held a memorial service in honor of Military Working Dog Jessey/L063. MWD Jessey was first assigned to Minot Air Force Base in June 2007. During her six years of honorable military service, MWD Jessey conducted numerous explosive sweeps for missions within the continental U.S. and other foreign countries. MWD Jessey was officially retired from duty on Nov. 20.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Aaron Allmon) The last days of an Airman's best friend
Two months ago, I spent a lot of time with the Military Working Dogs at Minot Air Force Base, N.D.; learning about their mission, getting to know them and even allowing myself to overcome one of my greatest fears of being attacked by a dog during their training. I had established a connection, not only with the handlers of the kennel, but with the
0 12/13
2012
Chilean Air Force Col. Cristian Eguia, Brazilian Air Force Col. Paulo Vasconcellos, and Peruvian Air Force Col. Marcos Huaman, 12th Air Force (Air Forces Southern) liaison officers stand next to the sign outside of the 12th Air Force (AFSOUTH) building on Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Nov. 30. An LNO represents their respective Air Force in the United States. They are the main link for Southern Command and their respective Air Forces in their countries. Part of their job is to help build the partnership between the two Air Forces so we can work together. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Brittany Dowdle) South American air forces bridge gap through AFSOUTH liaison program
A reality for members of the armed forces is relocation, be it another state or another country. For the South American airmen, one of the most coveted positions includes living thousands of miles from their country, fellow military members, family and friends -- working with the U.S. Air Force as a liaison officer. The liaison officers assigned to
0 12/12
2012
The presidential palace lies in ruins in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, nearly three years after the lethal earthquake – and the relief effort, which the 439th Airlift Wing joined.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Lt. Col. James Bishop)
A Reservist looks back at Haiti after the Earthquake
The rock in the water does not know the pain of the rock in the sun.-Haitian ProverbNearly three years after Haiti's lethal earthquake, and the 439th Airlift Wing's humanitarian response, I visited the recovering country.On January 12, 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, with the epicenter just 15 miles west of Port-au-Prince, killing
0 12/12
2012
ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam—Samples are labeled by a 36th Medical Group biological detection team member during proficiency training here Dec. 7. The 36th MDG laboratory is tested every quarter to ensure their personnel, equipment and identification procedure is proficient in case of a biological attack or medical outbreak. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Benjamin Wiseman/Released) Biological detection team trains to keep Andersen AFB safe
"Out of sight; out of mind," is never the policy of the 36th Medical Group lab detection team, who work year-round to ensure Airmen here are always prepared in case of a biological attack or a medical epidemic.The 36th MDG lab technicians take proficiency exams to stay current on training for biological attacks or a medical epidemic. The
0 12/11
2012
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