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Tech Sgt. Jessie Sosa, 89th Maintenance Group special air missions crew chief, demonstrates a jiu-jitsu throw for Senior Airman Anthony Vallejos and other members of the 811th Security Forces Squadron at the Joint Base Andrews Tactical Fitness Center at JB Andrews, Md., Oct. 10, 2017. Sosa, a practitioner of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, often has joint and muscle strains after competitions and back pain from long flight hours which he treats with battlefield acupuncture allowing him to avoid the use of pain medications. (U.S. Air Force photo by J.M. Eddins Jr.)
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Senior Airman Earnest Powell, a physiology technician (PT) assigned to the 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron High Altitude Airdrop Mission Support Center, Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., participates in a high-altitude mission, Nov. 16, 2016. PTs are responsible for ensuring aircrew are receiving proper amounts of oxygen while flying at altitudes above 20,000 feet. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Kenny Holston)
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A U.S. Air Force technical sergeant prepares for a high altitude low opening parachute jump aboard a C-130J Hercules, Nov. 16, 2016. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for airdropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Kenny Holston)
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Senior Airman Kristin Listien, a physiology technician (PT) assigned to the 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron High Altitude Airdrop Mission Support Center (HAAMSOC), Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., prepares for a static-line parachute jump, Nov. 16, 2016. Listien is part of the HAAMS mission where Airmen are specially trained to provide in-flight physiological support to aircrews, special operations forces, high-altitude parachutists, and other DoD agencies that perform unpressurized airdrop operations at 20,000 feet mean sea level and above. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Kenny Holston)
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Airmen assigned to the 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron High Altitude Airdrop Mission Support Center (HAAMSOC), Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., jump out of a C-130J Hercules for a high-altitude mission, Nov. 16, 2016. The HAAMS Airmen are specially trained to provide in-flight physiological support to aircrews, special operations forces, high altitude parachutists, and other DoD agencies that perform unpressurized airdrop operations at 20,000 feet mean sea level and above. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Kenny Holston)
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A mobile oxygen system kit sits onboard a C-130J Hercules during the preflight preparation of a high altitude training mission at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. on Nov. 16, 2016. The Oxygen system pictured is an integral piece of safety equipment that mitigates hypoxia. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Brandon Shapiro)
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A C-130J Hercules loadmaster stands on an aircraft ramp while wearing an oxygen mask because of the high altitude and unpressurized aircraft cabin, Nov. 17, 2016. Monitoring the crewmembers are High Altitude Airdrop Mission physiology technicians stationed at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Brandon Shapiro)
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Graphic by Maureen Stewart
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(U.S. Air Force graphic/Maureen Stewart)
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A C-17 Globemaster III from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., receives fuel from a 92nd Air Refueling Wing KC-135 Stratotanker Nov. 12, 2015, over Washington state. During the flight, honorary commanders were able to lie beside Staff Sgt. Gregory Albers, a 93rd Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, during refueling, as well as view another refueling mission from the cockpit of a different KC-135 and C-17. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Taylor Bourgeous)
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Our cover story, titled “Standing in the Door” tells the story of a brave group of U.S. Air Force Academy cadets who are members of the only parachuting training course where the students perform their first jump by themselves. Its purpose is to develop leadership traits through overcoming their own fears. (U.S. Air Force graphic)
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Staff Sgt. Jesse Tucker checks the temperature of a connex freezer at the 379th Air Expeditionary Wing in Southwest Asia, Dec. 17, 2013. The connex freezer is used to keep food products at the appropriate temperature and prevent it from s. Tucker is a 379th Expeditionary Force Support Squadron member deployed from Hurlburt Field, Fla., and a Navarre, Fla., native. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Hannah Landeros)
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Our cover story, titled “Capturing Space,” takes a remarkable look at the mission of Detachment 5 of the 21st Space Group, which, using some of the world’s most powerful telescopes, tracks man-made objects orbiting our planet. While that mission is fascinating in its own right, what truly sets it apart is its location – located on the top of Mount Haleakala, a dormant volcano, on the island of Maui, Hawaii.
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(U.S. Air Force graphic/J. Luke Borland) (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Bennie Davis III)
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Airman February 2013
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