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We really do have the technology: 3-D printing takes wounded warriors to a new dimension 3-D printing takes wounded warriors to a new dimension
One wounded warrior wanted to amble around the hotel pool during his honeymoon without strapping on prosthetic legs. Another wanted ice skates to fit snugly onto his prosthetic feet so he’d receive the sensory feedback he’d come to expect when engaging in his favorite pastime. And yet another wanted to hold a fishing rod while enjoying full use of the hook where his hand used to be.
0 11/03
2017
Staff Sgt. Ryan Garrison embraces his service dog Luke at their home in Glen Burnie, Md., March 29, 2016. Garrison, who works at the Defense Courier Station-Baltimore on Fort Meade, Md., recently received the Labrador who helps him cope with the physical and emotional effects of his combat-related injury. (U.S. Air Force photo/Sean Kimmons) Licking their wounds: Trained dogs assist, comfort wounded Airmen
Constant back pain from an injury suffered years ago in combat still troubles Staff Sgt. Ryan Garrison. It wakes him up at night when his medication wears off. It triggers his depression and anxiety, leading to angry outbursts. Several prescriptions and mental health visits didn’t effectively assist with his emotional state. The 39-year-old defense courier then met Luke, a pitch-black Labrador.
0 11/15
2016
The National Intrepid Center of Excellence, a directorate of the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., helps active duty, reserve, and National Guard members and their families manage their traumatic brain injuries and accompanying psychological health conditions through diagnostic evaluation, treatment planning, outpatient clinical care, and TBI research. DoD photo National Intrepid Center zeroes in on traumatic brain injury
Defense Medical Surveillance System and Theater Medical Data figures show that more than 339,000 service members have been diagnosed with traumatic brain injury since 2000. For service members on their roads to recovery, the National Intrepid Center of Excellence in Bethesda, Maryland, stands ready to help.
0 7/18
2016
Col. Jose Villalobos (left), 59th Dental Group maxillofacial prosthetics program director, and Maj. Stephen Cherrington (center), 59th Dental Group maxillofacial prosthodontist, discuss retired Army Master Sgt. Todd Nelson’s new prosthetic ear at the San Antonio Military Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, June 28. The 59th Medical Wing's Maxillofacial Prosthetics Department is one of only a few in the Department of Defense that creates prosthetic body parts, such as eyes, ears and noses. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Kevin Iinuma) 59th MDW brings normalcy to wounded patients
Most people have no idea what “maxillofacial” means, but to wounded warriors with traumatic injuries the word inspires hope. Disfigured by circumstances while abroad or at home, maxillofacial prosthodontics gives wounded warriors, veterans and civilians a chance at living a normal life.
0 7/12
2016
Air Force Tech. Sgt. Brian Williams, left, and Air Force veteran Staff Sgt. Sven Perryman return a volley during the sitting volleyball gold medal round in the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., June 21, 2016. (DOD photo/EJ Hersom) AF served sitting volleyball gold at Warrior Games
The Air Force sitting volleyball team claimed gold as the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games wound down at the U.S. Military Academy June 21.
0 6/22
2016
Fireworks light the sky above Trophy Point overlooking the Hudson River during the closing ceremony for the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y. June 21, 2016. DoD photo by EJ Hersom Warrior Games conclude with medal ceremony, concert
After a week of intense international competition, the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games drew to a close June 21 with a medal ceremony and concert, followed by fireworks.
0 6/22
2016
Heather Carter, an above-knee amputee, runs laps around a track inside the Military Advanced Training Center at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., April 13, 2016. Carter, a medically retired senior airman, and other amputees receive physical and occupational therapy at the center as they work toward their goals. One of Carter’s goals is to return to competitive softball. (U.S. Air Force photo/Sean Kimmons) Standing tall: Amputee Airmen seek to defy odds in therapy sessions
After a sprint around an indoor track with her prosthetic running blade, Heather Carter stopped, visibly tired. She smiled and began to sprint another lap. The medically retired senior airman once rounded the bases for the Air Force softball team until a freak accident severely injured her left leg as she raced to first base during a game in 2010. Four years and many surgeries later, she chose to have the leg amputated.
0 6/16
2016
Retired Air Force Capt. Chris Cochrane, left, accepts the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games torch from Navy Lt. Ramesh Haytasingh of the U.S. Special Operations Command team during opening ceremonies at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., June 15, 2016. With Haytasingh is his son, Tobias. (Department of Defense photo/EJ Hersom) Torch lighting, honoring Vietnam vets kicks off 2016 Warrior Games
The 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games began June 15 at West Point, New York, when Army Capt. Kelly Elmlinger, with help from comedian Jon Stewart, lit the official torch during the event’s opening ceremonies at the U.S. Military Academy.
0 6/16
2016
Default Air Force Logo BLUE: Charlie Mike to Recovery
Through the fog of post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic injuries, and illness, American veterans realize that the ability to regain control of their minds and bodies lies within their own hands.
0 6/15
2016
Staff Sgt. Sebastiana Lopez Arellano, a patient at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, does pushups during her therapy session at the center’s Military Advanced Training Center, which provides amputee patients with state-of-the-art care, in Bethesda, Md., April 16, 2016. Lopez lost her right leg and suffered several other injuries in a motorcycle crash in 2015. She now uses sports and fitness as part of her physical and occupational therapy regimen. (U.S. Air Force photo/Sean Kimmons) No limits: Airman pushes past near death experience
Staff Sgt. Sebastiana Lopez Arellano was riding a motorcycle when an animal scurried onto the road, causing her to swerve and hit a curb. As she high-sided over her bike, the momentum catapulted her body into a tree. The impact severed her right leg. As she recovered, she found comfort in sports and fitness. A year after her crash, she competed in the Air Force Trials for wounded warriors and gained confidence by earning invitations to the Invictus and Warrior Games.
0 6/14
2016
Former President George W. Bush fist bumps with Air Force Master Sgt. Israel Del Toro during the 2016 Invictus Games Symposium on Invisible Wounds in Orlando, Fla., May 8, 2016. The symposium, hosted by Bush and Britain’s Prince Harry, sought to destigmatize the victims of post-traumatic stress and other injuries that are not readily visible. DoD photo by EJ Hersom Prince Harry, former President Bush stress importance of healing invisible wounds
Great Britain’s Prince Harry, former President George W. Bush, and service members from each of their nations led a discussion at the 2016 Invictus Games Symposium on Invisible Wounds presented May 8 by the George W. Bush Institute in Orlando, Florida.
0 5/11
2016
Fireworks erupt as the flags of 15 nations are displayed during the opening ceremony for Invictus Games 2016 at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, Fla., May 8, 2016. The 2016 Invictus Games officially kicked off with the ceremony and wounded warriors will compete over the next five days in multiple adaptive sports events. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Master Sgt. Kevin Wallace) Let the healing begin: Invictus Games kick off
The thudding noise of helicopter blades cut through the air, bright-colored lights sliced through smoke and fans cheered to honor the more than 500 military competitors from 15 nations who gathered at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, Florida, on May 8 to compete in Invictus Games 2016.
0 5/09
2016
Default Air Force Logo Online registration for 2016 DOD Warrior Games now open
Online registration is now open to participate in the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games at cvent.com. Volunteers, media and distinguished visitors -- as well as selected athletes, family members, non-medical attendants, staff and coaches -- must register online to participate.
0 4/14
2016
Former Staff Sgt. Gregory Miller, right, talks about one of his mixed media pieces during a healing arts event Nov. 12 at the Pentagon. Miller and other wounded military members were recognized for their work as part of a healing arts program created by the Defense Department and the National Endowment for the Arts to offer art therapy to recovering troops. (U.S. Air Force photo/Sean Kimmons) Art therapy helps close the wounds of Air Force vets
As a mortuary affairs Airman, retired Master Sgt. Justin Jordan handled dozens of bodies of service members, many of whom were killed downrange. But one mission at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, finally made him crack.
0 11/13
2015
The Air Force competes against the Navy for 3rd place during the 4th Annual Pentagon Sitting Volleyball Tournament Navy Nov. 20, 2014, at the Pentagon Athletic Club.  The one-day tournament is designed to bring awareness to the challenges of the wounded, ill or injured population. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Anthony Nelson Jr.) Pentagon holds 4th Annual Pentagon Sitting Volleyball Tournament
Fifty-two active-duty and veteran athletes from each of the military services and the U.S. Special Operations Command participated in the 4th Annual Pentagon Sitting Volleyball Tournament Nov. 20 at the Pentagon Athletic Club.
1 11/21
2014
Kai, a service dog, lays on the lap of Staff Sgt. August O'Niell during an Air Force wounded, ill or injured warrior sitting volleyball practice  Nov. 18, 2014, at Joint Base Andrews, Md. O'Niell, a pararescueman, was wounded in July 2011 during a deployment to Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Brian Ferguson) AFW2 helps Airmen take steps toward recovery
One would never know the twelve current and retired Airmen walking into the Joint Base Andrews West Fitness Center, Nov. 18, were wounded, ill or seriously injured. Minutes later, it is evident as the bleachers and floor fill with gym bags, volleyballs and prosthetic limbs, while two dogs sit loyally on the sideline waiting for their owners to return from practice.
0 11/19
2014
USA Team members gather to be recognized on stage Sept. 14, 2014, at the closing ceremony of the Invictus Games in London. Approximately 26,000 people were on hand for the event. The games featured athletes competing in various Paralympic-style events, including swimming, track and field, seated volleyball, wheelchair basketball, and wheelchair rugby, among others. (Courtesy photo) Invictus Games come to a close, US places in team events
Roughly 26,000 people showed up to give the inaugural Invictus Games an enormous sendoff and pay final respect to all the athletes involved here Sept. 14.
1 9/15
2014
The U.S. fought hard in the wheelchair basketball finals, but fell 19-9 to Great Britain to take silver at the inaugural Invictus Games Sept. 13, in London. The Invictus Games featured athletes competing in various Paralympic-style events, including swimming, track and field, seated volleyball, wheelchair basketball, and wheelchair rugby, among others. (Courtesy photo) USA Team takes silver in wheelchair basketball
The U.S. fought hard in the wheelchair basketball finals, but fell 19-9 to Great Britain to take silver here at the inaugural Invictus Games Sept. 13.
0 9/15
2014
Retired Air Force Staff Sgt. Melissa Coduti concentrates as she prepares to make her lift in the women’s heavyweight powerlifting competition at the Invictus Games Sept. 14, 2014, in London. The Invictus Games feature athletes competing in various Paralympic-style events, including swimming, track and field, seated volleyball, wheelchair basketball, and wheelchair rugby, among others. (U.S. Navy photo/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Mark Logico)
Invictus Games: Airman takes silver in powerlifting
A retired Air Force staff sergeant took silver in the heavyweight powerlifting category here Sept. 14, in the final day of competition at the inaugural Invictus Games.
0 9/15
2014
A flyover by the Royal Air Force’s aerial aerobatic team, The Red Arrows, helped kick off the opening ceremony for the inaugural Invictus Games Sept 10, 2014, in London. The Invictus Games are a Paralympic-style contest that features wounded warriors from different nations competing in various events. (Courtesy photo) Invictus Games kick off with opening ceremony
More than 5,000 people attended the Invictus Games’ opening ceremony Sept. 10, on the South Lawn of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, here.
0 9/11
2014
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