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Col. John Boudreaux suffered a critical sudden cardiac arrest in 2016. He was dead for several minutes. Less than six percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims survive the trip to the hospital: His doctors gave him less than one percent. Today, as a group commander at Cannon Air Force Base, N. M., he bears the scars that remind him for every one of him, there are 99 others buried in the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) A commander’s story of survival
The sound of tire treads rolling over a smooth driveway was the only sound that could be heard on the street Col. John Boudreaux lived when he and his wife, Susi, pulled up to it. Susi shoved the gear shift to “Park.” She couldn’t do it fast enough, and sat back in the seat for a moment. She collected her thoughts as she closed her eyes and let her head fall back into the headrest. Her mind raced faster than her car could.
0 11/22
2017
Keesler Air Force Base Honor Guard members practice flag folding procedures before a funeral ceremony Oct. 26, 2017, at the Biloxi National Cemetery in Biloxi, Mississippi. The mission of the Keesler Air Force Base Honor Guard is to represent the Air Force by providing military honors at the request of families for fallen military members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Suzanna Plotnikov) Honor guard brings new perspective for Airman
Some people see the honor guard when they’re performing their duties; attending funerals, parades, presenting colors and firing their rifles. They may not know what goes on behind the scenes, or what goes on in their minds. For Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Graham, Keesler Air Force Base Honor Guard Delta Flight noncommissioned officer in charge, the year-long honor guard contract was not what he expected it to be.
0 11/01
2017
Airman 1st Class Isaiah Randall, 23d Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance apprentice, poses for a photo, Oct. 2, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Among four months of turmoil, Randall came to understand the true concept of resiliency, leaning on the support from his family, both by blood and by service, and God to guide him through. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Airman counters life's jabs
God. Family. Boxing. That’s all that matters to Airman 1st Class Isaiah Randall, 23rd Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance apprentice. Life’s unpredictable ups and downs often test people in ways that shake the foundations that give them peace though.
0 10/16
2017
U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. William Taylor, center, 100th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department installation fire chief, poses for a photo with some of his firefighter family Sept. 26, 2017, on RAF Mildenhall, England. Taylor was trapped, alone and almost lost his life in a fire during a training session when he was a new Airman in July 1997, aged just 20. Afterwards, he vowed to become a fire chief and that safety, training and family oriented culture would be his main focal points to ensure his team’s success. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karen Abeyasekere) Fire chief shares personal story of trauma, perseverance
Trapped and alone in a smoke-filled room with zero visibility, flames raging outside and the temperature rapidly rising to hundreds of degrees Fahrenheit, Airman 1st Class William Taylor realized that he was alone. His only hope of staying alive was to get himself out of there – and fast.
0 10/16
2017
A photo depiction of a master sergeant writing poems with pen and paper. Master Sgt. Zhyronn Carter, 373rd Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Group/Alaska Mission Operations Center, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, recently published her book in November 2016. According to Carter, her book consists of poems about domestic abuse and sexual trauma from different points of views. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes) Writer, Airman finds beauty through adversity in flowers
“Beauty comes in different forms. When we see beauty, we assume that it had a great life; but there is more than meets the eye. Even the most beautiful soul comes from a place of hardship and sorrow. There are many tragedies that happen to us all; whether it is domestic abuse or sexual trauma, we will triumph and continue to bloom like flowers.”
0 9/04
2017
Master Sgt. Norbert Feist, 386th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chef inspects the right wheel well on aircraft 1004 Wednesday, August 30th, at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia. Feist has been the dedicated crew chief for aircraft 1004 for 21 years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Eric M. Sharman) Time Tested: Airman serves 21 years on same aircraft
Since entering active military service in 1956, the C-130 Hercules has earned its place in the storied history of air power, time and time again. From Vietnam all the way up through Operation Inherent Resolve, the C-130 has always made a name for itself by providing critical airlift. For Master Sgt. Norbert Feist, a 386th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron C-130H crew chief, one C-130 in particular has a special place in his personal Air Force storybook.
0 9/04
2017
Commandant Micka, a French exchange pilot and assistant director of operations for Moody’s 41st Rescue Squadron, stands in front of an HH-60G Pavehawk, Aug. 2, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Prior to his arrival at the 41st RQS, Micka transitioned from flying the French Air Force’s EC-725 Caracal helicopter to learn the HH-60. Since his childhood, Micka aspired to serve and fly for the French and U.S. military as a rescue pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Greg Nash) “Fight and Save:" French exchange pilot reaches multinational dream
Allured by the distant chopping of helicopter blades, a young French boy diverts his attention from his television screen to watch native pilots rescue stranded hikers in Southeast France.
0 8/19
2017
Staff Sgt. Amanda Cubbage, a 355th Security Forces Squadron member, reunites with her recently retired military working dog, Rick, in Tucson, Ariz., Aug. 8, 2017. Cubbage worked with Rick while she served as a MWD handler at Osan Air Base, South Korea. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Michael X. Beyer) Defender reunites with MWD
(This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series. These stories focus on individual Airmen, highlighting their Air Force story.) After nearly a year apart, it was an emotional moment when Staff Sgt. Amanda Cubbage, a 355th Security Forces Squadron member and prior military working dog handler, was reunited with her MWD, Rick, Aug. 8, 2017.
0 8/11
2017
Master Sgts. Laura and Mark Magee attend the annual Nevada Air National Guard Airman of the Year Ceremony at the Nevada ANG’s fuel cell hangar Dec. 4, 2016. The married couple converted to Islam after Laura completed the chaplain assistant course in Fort Jackson, S.C. three years ago. (U.S. Air National Guard photo/Tech. Sgt. Emerson Marcus) Nevada ANG chaplain: 'I want people to know Islam is not evil'
Laura Magee remembers asking her father about religion when she was 8 while innocently combing her hair in front of a large vanity mirror. It was the first time she can remember asking one of her parents about the existence of a God — which she said her father quickly repudiated. Her parents identified as agnostic or atheist, she said. For Laura, now a master sergeant in the Nevada Air National Guard, these sorts of questions lingered and often went unanswered, even as she attended Christian services in adulthood.
0 5/11
2017
Staff Sgt. Semaj, 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron supply craftsman, displays her back pose March 27, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. Semaj is a nationally qualified amateur bodybuilder competing in the figure category. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Airman balanced through bodybuilding
As Staff Sgt. Semaj’s alarm screeches throughout her bedroom at 2:30 a.m., she wakes for her morning cardio session, checks on her 6-year-old son, Jamel, and then laces up her running shoes. Semaj, a 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron supply craftsman, does this every morning to keep her body in shape in preparation for her next bodybuilding event where she hopes to earn her professional status.
0 5/02
2017
Staff Sgt. Jessica Fairchild (center), a former military training instructor and currently an individual protective equipment supervisor assigned to the 6th Logistics Readiness Squadron, pauses for a photo with Airman 1st Class Zenawi Tecle (left), a former trainee of Fairchild and now an entry controller with the 6th Security Forces Squadron, and Senior Airman Kristin Weiland (right), an individual protective equipment technician with the 6th LRS, Feb. 24, 2017, at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. Fairchild served four years as an MTI applying professionalism and dedication to train thousands of people and groomed them into Airmen before returning to her current career field. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Mariette Adams) Molding yesterday’s trainees into tomorrow’s Airmen
For Staff Sgt. Jessica Fairchild, a former MTI at JB San Antonio-Lackland, those long hours were worth it. Six years into her career, Fairchild applied to be an MTI. She had dreams to be a teacher and chose to focus that drive into shaping the next generation of Airmen.
0 4/25
2017
Staff Sgt. Chuck, 32nd Intelligence Squadron, 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing, performs a plank exercise January 30, 2017 at the Gaffney Fitness Center on Fort George G. Meade. Chuck had his left leg amputated in November 2016 when he found he had the disease called Pseudomyogenic Hemangioendothelioma of Bone. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. AJ Hyatt) 70th ISRW amputee Airman hopes to return to active duty, soccer and deploy
(This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series. These stories focus on individual Airmen, highlighting their Air Force story.)
0 3/06
2017
Master Sgt. Jason Paseur, the 386th Air Expeditionary Wing historian, poses for a photo in front of a C-130H Hercules at the flightline here Feb. 7, 2017. Paseur is a reservist deployed from Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Ga. and teaches history as a civilian. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Andrew Park) Deployment provides reservist teacher valuable experience for classroom
Master Sgt. Jason Paseur, currently deployed in Southwest Asia as the 386th Air Expeditionary Wing historian, is always on the hunt for creative lessons for the classroom where he teaches as a civilian. Paseur is a reservist deployed from the 94th Airlift Wing out of Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Georgia.
0 2/09
2017
Capt. David, 79th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron pilot, taxis an F-16 Fighting Falcon before a night mission Jan. 13, 2017 at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. To become a pilot, David went to school while working as a maintainer, through a deployment to Balad Airfield, Iraq and temporary duties where he was often gone for three weeks out of every month. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Katherine Spessa) Maintainer-turned-fighter pilot puts new skills to the test
(This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series. These stories focus on individual Airmen, highlighting their Air Force story.) When Capt. David was a child, his father would take him out to the flightline at Canon Air Force Base, New Mexico, and sit him in the cockpit of an F-111 Aardvark. Looking up at his dad, David would say, “One day, I’m going to be a pilot.”
0 1/17
2017
Airman 2nd Class Bob Cunningham, of the 1374th Mapping and Charting Squadron, operates radar equipment on North Danger Island in 1956. The tiny island in the South China Sea, located midway between the Philippine Islands and Vietnam, became an important station during an Air Force project to accurately map the world using aerial electronic geodetic survey. The processed data would eventually benefit intercontinental ballistic missile targeting. (Courtesy photo/Bob Cunningham) Castaway Airman helped map the world
For six months in 1956 Bob Cunningham, a former Air Force radar operator, lived on a remote knob approximately 2,000 feet long and 850 feet wide in the Spratly Islands group located midway between the Philippine Islands and Vietnam. His home was a canvas tent and he manned radio and radar equipment for a secret Air Force project mapping the earth.
0 1/11
2017
Tech. Sgt. Jason Caswell, 455th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron C-130 Hercules debrief NCO-in-charge, stands in a C-130 hangar at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, Jan. 5, 2017. After a sports injury in 2010, Caswell underwent a year of surgeries, two years of painful limb-recovery therapy, followed by physical therapy. In October 2014, his limb still hadn’t healed and began to worsen. Caswell elected to amputate his injured leg. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Katherine Spessa) Deployed wounded warrior completes back-to-back tours
“Being here, you get treated like a normal person, not like an amputee. Not like an injured guy,” said Tech. Sgt. Jason Caswell, as he added more 45-pound plates to his barbell.
0 1/05
2017
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Preston Moten, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aerospace ground equipment schedule and training monitor, stands in front of 20th EMS Airmen at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., Dec. 9, 2016. Moten had retained negative habits from his life prior to the Air Force that jeopardized his career and the safety of his fellow Airmen, but used the support and guidance offered by his team members to break those habits and become more resilient. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kathryn R.C. Reaves) Airman finds potential through EPR
Enlisted performance reports have the power to affect an Airman’s career. For one Airman, an EPR had the power to change how he saw his life. Staff Sgt. Preston Moten, a 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aerospace ground equipment schedule and training monitor, said the rating from his first EPR made him realize it was time to straighten up and listen to the positive people around him.
0 1/03
2017
Retired U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Leroi Smith became a Tuskegee Airman at the age of 16 in 1943. Smith said getting to know the Tuskegee aircrew was one of his best memories. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Staff. Sgt. Regina Edwards) Tuskegee Airman reflects on time in service
Retired Master Sgt. Leroy Mazell Smith, a maintainer with the 332nd Fighter Group also known as Tuskegee Airmen, shares his story.
0 12/03
2016
U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. John Marks, poses with an A-10 Thunderbolt II at King Fahd Air Base, Saudi Arabia, during Desert Storm in February, 1991. Destroying and damaging more than 30 Iraqi tanks was one of Marks most memorable combat missions during Desert Storm. (Courtesy photo provided by Lt. Col. Marks) Whiteman pilot reflects on 6,000 hours in the A-10
Nearly three decades of flying and 11 combat deployments later, Lt. Col. John Marks, a pilot with the 303rd Fighter Squadron has achieved a milestone that equates to 250 days in the cockpit, which most fighter pilots will never reach and puts him among the highest time fighter pilots in the Air Force.
0 12/01
2016
Senior Airman Michael Mwelwa, of the 60th Comptroller Squadron, stands by his workstation at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., Oct. 25, 2016. Mwelwa was recently awarded U.S. citizenship after coming to the United States at the age five from Zambia. (U.S. Air Force photo/Louis Briscese) A different path to citizenship
Being an American citizen may seem ordinary for most, but for some Airmen, the path to citizenship is anything but ordinary. Senior Airman Michael Mwelwa, a 60th Comptroller Squadron military pay technician, was awarded U.S. citizenship in May at the age of 23. Mwelwa was born in Zambia, a country in southern Africa. He lived there until was 5, when his parents decided to leave in hopes of a better life.
0 11/23
2016
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