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The “High Bay” at the USAFSAM lab at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, April 25, 2018. The 711th Human Performance Wing trains new Critical Care Air Transport Team crew members using two C-130 and one C-17 training airframes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Richard Eldridge) Air Force ramps up flying ICU teams
When the U.S. military needs to transport critically injured patients by air, it calls on Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Teams. The Air Force is increasing CCATT capabilities to meet the needs of the warfighter.
0 5/01
2018
Lt. Col. Elizabeth Erickson (first row, second from right), a U.S. Air Force physician, poses for a photo with Afghan women healthcare providers and Staff Sgt. Sarah Saelens when she worked on the Zabul Provincial Reconstruction Team. The PRT worked closely with local healthcare providers to improve the health and wellbeing of Afghan women. (Courtesy photo) Female physician builds partnerships through Global Health Engagements
A career in the Air Force is often a truly global experience. For Lt. Col. Elizabeth Erickson, her experiences in military health outreach around the world allows her to build strong partnerships.
0 3/28
2018
Default Air Force Logo First-ever blood test for detecting brain injury cleared by FDA
Brain injuries can happen from a fall, while in combat or during training exercises. Thanks in part to research funded by the Defense Department and the Army, Banyan Biomarkers has created the first-ever brain trauma blood test. On Feb. 14, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration cleared marketing of the Banyan Biomarkers’ Brain Trauma Indicator.
0 3/16
2018
Default Air Force Logo Clinic answers call for invisible wound care
In the midst of brain injury awareness month, construction of a facility to treat traumatic brain injury is well underway at the 96th Medical Group.
0 3/14
2018
Col. Debra Lovette, 81st Training Wing commander, receives a briefing from 2nd Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations squadron room nurse, on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at Keesler Medical Center, Miss., June 16, 2017. The training program was stood up in March, 2017 and has trained surgical teams within the Air Force and across the Department of the Defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue). Robotic surgery training program aims at improving patient outcomes
As the use of surgical robotics increases, the Air Force Medical Service is training its surgical teams in the latest technology, ensuring patients have access to the most advanced surgical procedures and best possible outcomes.
0 2/06
2018
Maj. Linda Jones, U.S. Air Force Pediatric Medical Director with the 628th Medical Operations Squadron works with a patient in Nepal in July 2017. Jones is just one of the International Health Specialists (IHSs) supporting U.S. Pacific Command’s (PACAF) capacity-building efforts by providing medical, dental, optometry, and engineering assistance to their citizens. (U.S. Air Force photo) International health specialists employ unique skills to build medical capabilities with partner nations
Healthcare is a critical avenue to strengthen partnerships with U.S. allies around the globe. The Air Force International Health Specialist program takes highly trained Air Force health personnel with unique skill sets, and puts them in Global Health Engagements around the world. There, they share their experiences and work to improve the health infrastructure in their partner nation.
0 1/24
2018
U.S. Air Force Medical Service Corps Officer, Maj. Stephanie Proellochs (center), works with two of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center’s physical therapists in Bethesda, MD, Nov. 8, 2017. Kyla Dunlavey (right) and Alyssa Olsen (left) work with the rest of Proellochs’ medical team throughout her amputation recovery.  Proellochs was diagnosed with a metastatic tumor in her left foot in January 2017, which resulted in having her foot amputated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis) Living with an attitude of gratitude – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 3)
After only taking her first steps in November, Proellochs, a Medical Service Corps officer and recent amputee, was already thinking of how she would be able to run and eventually snowboard with her family.
0 1/11
2018
Maj. Stephanie Proellochs carefully inspects her leg and prosthesis after a round of physical therapy exercises at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Nov. 15, 2017. Proellochs underwent an amputation as a result of a malignant tumor that spread. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis) Embracing the uncharted life as an amputee – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 2)
Maj. Stephanie Proellochs , a recent amputee, gazes up at the rock climbing wall at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center’s physical therapy center in Bethesda, Maryland. She recalled the time she witnessed a service member who had lost his arm effortlessly climb his way to the top.
0 1/02
2018
U.S. Air Force Maj. Stephanie Proellochs relies on her wheelchair as she heads in to her daily physical therapy session at Walter Reed Medical Center, Nov. 8, 2017. Proellochs received a below-the-knee amputation in September 2017 to treat a malignant tumor that had metastasized and spread. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis) Every journey begins with a single step – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 1)
Maj. Stephanie Proellochs, a Medical Service Corps officer, was fighting cancer, overcoming the odds and set on returning to active duty. Unfortunately, just when the finish line was in sight, new challenges presented themselves.
0 12/21
2017
The gift of a kidney bolsters bond between classmates Organ donation bolsters bond between classmates
Col. Dave Ashley’s schedule since May 2017 included climbing a mountain, completing a 40-mile trail run, competing in a multiday athletic event that included bicycling and kayaking and achieving a perfect score on his military physical fitness test, his seventh in a row. Ashley accomplished all of these feats after donating a kidney. What began as an impulse to help a desperately ill former classmate has turned into a campaign to make sure other service members know the Military Health System supports those who want to become living organ donors.
0 11/07
2017
Default Air Force Logo Annual consent for automatic prescription refills begins Sept. 1
Beginning Sept. 1, 2017, Express Scripts will need annual consent from patients who want to receive automatic refills of their maintenance medications enrolled in TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. This means that just before one of your prescriptions runs out of refills, Express Scripts will reach out to you to know if you would like your doctor to be contacted to renew the prescription and if you’d like to continue in the Automatic Refill program. If not, Express Scripts will not refill your prescription.
0 8/17
2017
AFMS MTFs Pilot Medical Readiness Air Force Military Treatment Facilities pilot medical readiness
Air Force Medicine has a non-stop global readiness mission. Medical Airmen must be prepared to deploy on short notice to provide life-saving and performance-enhancing healthcare in diverse, austere and isolated locations, and all Airmen must be medically ready to deploy. To achieve this readiness mission, the Air Force Medical Service operates 76 military treatment facilities around the world, which serve as the primary readiness and training vehicles.
0 8/12
2017
The Air Force Medical Service is launching a mobile app that will let users access the news and information available on the AFMS website right from their smartphones. New Air Force health mobile app available for patients
The Air Force Medical Service has launched a new mobile app to connect Airmen and patients to news and information about the AFMS. The new app is a mobile version of the AFMS website, and lets users customize their experience based on the Air Force military treatment facility they use. This way, patients can get information about clinic hours, find phone numbers and get other valuable information about the MTF where they work or get care.
0 7/07
2017
Default Air Force Logo PTSD treatment confronts the trauma behind the disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder is considered one of the “signature wounds” of the current conflicts in the Middle East. But many people may not know that there are highly effective treatments for this invisible wound being deployed at Air Force hospitals and clinics today.
0 6/22
2017
Chief Master Sergeant David J. Little, Chief, Medical Operations and Research, Office of the Air Force Surgeon General, speaks during the Feb. 2017 Medical Museum Science Café at the National Museum of Health and Medicine, on Tues., Feb. 28, 2017. Little's program was titled "Air Force Medical Service: Building Competent, Capable Enlisted Airmen." Air Force Medicine: Anytime, anywhere in the world
SILVER SPRING, MD. (AFNS) -- The U.S. Air Force Medical Service assures that the service deploys a medically-fit force and educates airmen to become medical professionals, according to Chief Master Sgt. David J. Little, the Office of the Air Force Surgeon General Chief of medical operations and research.
0 6/22
2017
Default Air Force Logo Connection saves lives: Be there to help prevent suicide
You can make a difference for someone struggling with suicidal thoughts with as little as eye contact and a friendly smile, an arm around the shoulder, or a kind word at the right time.
0 6/21
2017
May is mental health month, and mental health disorders are common in both military and civilian communities. Fortunately, effective treatments exist for most mental health disorders. Often, the biggest impediment to getting better is an unwillingness to seek care. Don’t suffer alone – mental health disorders have effective treatments
Mental health disorders are relatively common within civilian and military communities, but with early treatment, most mental health disorders can be effectively treated, and patients can return to mental wellness.
0 5/14
2017
Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, on Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a new type of heart device that provides patients with the most advanced pacing technology at one-tenth the size of a traditional pacemaker. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue) KMC medics implant AF’s 1st Micra TPS
The Keesler Medical Center became the first Air Force hospital to implant the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia April 13, 2017.
0 4/19
2017
An Air Force-invented cooling sleeve for a water bladder and cooling inserts for a specially-designed undershirt are two ways that Dr. Reginald O'Hara and his research team at the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine hope to help Battlefield Airmen and other special operations forces avoid heat-related illness while in hot, humid conditions. (Courtesy photo) Battlefield Airmen use science to beat the heat
Heat-related illness is a critical factor when personnel are operating in extreme temperatures. Dr. Reginald O'Hara and his exercise physiology research team at the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, are working to reduce that heat stress.
0 7/08
2016
Default Air Force Logo Changing Air Force health care through innovation
Air Force Medical Service Innovations and Personalized Medicine program personnel are conducting innovative research to find new solutions to improve healthcare throughout the Air Force.
0 6/30
2016
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