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An MQ-9 Reaper flies a training mission Oct. 18, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. MQ-9 and MQ-1 Predator aircrews helped liberate Raqqah, Syria, from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s control in early October. ISIS used the city as its capital for terrorist operations since January 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Combat RPAs integral in defeating ISIS
U.S. forces, coalition partners and Syrian Democratic Forces liberated Raqqah, Syria from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s control in early October 2017. ISIS used the city as its capital for terrorist operations since January 2014.
0 12/05
2017
Capt. Victor, 17th Attack Squadron MQ-9 Reaper pilot, teaches robotics students as a volunteer mentor Sept. 7, 2017, in Las Vegas. Engineering the future: MQ-9 pilot gives back
Service is defined as unrelenting devotion to one’s duty to his or her country. It’s one of the core values instilled into every Airman . However, for one Airman, it also means giving back to his community.
0 9/26
2017
Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson arrives at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., July 17, 2017. During her visit, Wilson saw firsthand how Nellis is at the forefront of modernization. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kevin Tanenbaum) SecAF visits Nellis AFB Airmen, experiences Red Flag exercise
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson visited Nellis and Creech Air Force Bases, Nevada July 17-21, 2017 to meet with Airmen and witness Red Flag ,the U. S. Air Force‘s premiere multi-domain integration training exercise.
0 7/26
2017
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson shares a laugh with members of the 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, July 19, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. During her visit, Wilson toured the base and gained insight into the dominant persistent attack and reconnaissance mission the Airmen of the 432nd WG complete 24/7/365 for our nation and coalition partners. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) SecAF gets firsthand look at MQ-1, MQ-9 mission
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson visited Creech Air Force Base July 19, 2017 to get a closer look at the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper mission. During her visit Wilson toured the base and gained insight into the dominant persistent attack and reconnaissance mission the Airmen of the 432nd Wing complete 24-7-365 for our nation and coalition partners.
0 7/21
2017
Master Sgt. Eric, 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Reaper Aircraft Maintenance Unit production superintendent, stands with the engine trainer he created June 19, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. He saw a need to have a power capable training engine to practice engine rigging, which involves tuning the actuators that translate electrical signals to mechanical commands. If done improperly the engine can shutoff when not intended. The trainer allowed maintainers to train on this vital task without taking an operational aircraft out of the rotation. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) MQ-9 maintainer’s innovation expedites engine training
In order to enable airpower, the Air Force calls upon skilled and competent maintainers to perform all required functions to keep aircraft ready.
0 7/06
2017
The new Block 5 MQ-9 Reaper is loaded with AGM-114 Hellfire missiles, a GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bomb and a GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition April 13, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. On 23 June, 2017, the latest version of the MQ-9 Reaper, the Block 5 variant, was successfully flown in combat in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. The aircrew flew a sortie of over 16 hours with a full payload of weapons including GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munitions and AGM-114 Hellfire missiles. During the mission, the crew employed one GBU-38 and two Hellfires while providing hours of armed reconnaissance for supported ground forces. The Block 5 is equipped with improved electrical and communications systems which provides better software and hardware upgrades for future operations. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen)
Block 5 MQ-9 debuts in combat
The latest version of the MQ-9 Reaper, the Block 5 variant, flew its first successful combat mission June 23, 2017, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.
0 6/29
2017
U.S. Air Force Capt. Nicole Tripputi, a contract negotiator with the 645th Aeronautical Systems Group, Big Safari, gives the oath of enlistment to her sister, Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Stem, 88th Aerospace medicine squadron ophthalmic technician, during a re-enlistment ceremony June 19 inside the auditorium of the Wright-Patterson Medical Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The two have been stationed together at WPAFB for the first time since August 2016.(U.S. Air Force photos/Michelle Gigante) Airman looks to sister for re-enlistment ceremony
An ophthalmic technician in the 88th Medical Group didn’t choose to be sworn in by her unit commander when she was ready to re-enlist. Instead, she turned to a family member – her younger sister. The re-enlistment ceremony for Tech. Sgt. Jennifer Stem was held June 19, 2017, in the auditorium of the Wright-Patterson Medical Center, with Capt. Nicole Tripputi, a contract negotiator with the 645th Aeronautical Systems Group, Big Safari, doing the honors.
0 6/27
2017
An MQ-9 Reaper sits on the flight line Nov. 16, 2016, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The MQ-9 provides persistent attack and reconnaissance capabilities for combatant commanders and coalition forces involved in 24/7/365 combat operations abroad. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class James Thompson)  Cleared hot: When predators and reapers engage
Following the mission brief and pre-flight checks, an aircrew consisting of an officer pilot in command and a career enlisted aviator sensor operator observe a target in an area of responsibility overseas from a cockpit in the U.S. and waits for the green light from a joint terminal attack controller on the ground.
0 6/21
2017
Capt. Abrham, 42nd Attack Squadron MQ-9 Reaper pilot, communicates with a joint terminal attack controller June 14, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. Members of the MQ-9 community have used the Frankenphone to improve communications with the ground forces. In 2016, another member of the 42nd ATKS, Capt. Gregory, improved the design of the Frankenphone creating the 2.0 version which offered increased durability and sound clarity. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Frankenphone 2.0: MQ-9 communication innovation
In 2015, a former member of the 42nd Attack Squadron saw a need to improve communications from MQ-9 Reaper aircrew to ground forces, thus, Frankenphone was created.
0 6/15
2017
The 42nd Attack Squadron reach it's centennial anniversary June 13, 2017. It's lineage can be traced back to World War I where it was a training unit before being re-designated in the mid-1930's as a bombardment squadron. During World War II, the 42nd flew bomber aircraft such as the B-18 Bolo, B-17 Flying Fortress and B-24 Liberator in six aerial campaigns during World War II over the Pacific theater including the Battle of Midway. In 1963, the unit inactivated and briefly returned in 1989 as an air refueling squadron, but soon inactivated again in 1990. In 2006, the 42nd became the first MQ-9 Reaper squadron and continues today providing dominant persistent attack and reconnaissance to the combatant commanders 24/7/365. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) First MQ-9 squadron looks good for 100
From training to operational--bombers to remotely piloted aircraft, the Panthers of the 42nd Attack Squadron have been a key part of United States airpower for the past 100 years. On June 13, 2017, the squadron celebrates its centennial anniversary with a lineage as the 42nd Aero Squadron, part of the U.S. Signal Corps. Back then, the unit trained aviators during World War I and continued until the mid-1930’s when it was redesignated as the 42nd Bombardment Squadron and placed under the operational control of Reserve personnel.
0 6/13
2017
An MQ-9 Reaper, loaded with four GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bombs is ready for a training mission March 31, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The MQ-9, matched with a skilled aircrew, provides persistent attack and reconnaissance capabilities 24/7/365. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) All in a night’s work: MQ-9s maximize airpower downrange
As many Americans sleep soundly in their beds, Airmen in attack squadrons across the 432nd Wing flying the MQ-1B Predator and MQ-9 Reaper from cockpits in the continental U.S. are having decisive effects in the fight against violent extremism. In combat operations last week, one MQ-9 squadron stood above the rest when aircrews employed 13 Hellfire missiles and 500-pound bombs during one eight-hour overnight shift.
0 5/25
2017
On May 9, 2017, the 15th ATKS celebrated their 100-year anniversary and reflected on the unit’s extensive and honorable heritage, which coincidentally, includes their use of airpower in nearly every major conflict of the 20th Century. This heritage is carried on in today’s fight with remotely piloted aircraft MQ-1 Predators. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class James Thompson) MQ-1 squadron celebrates 100 years
The 15th Attack Squadron patch depicting a pigeon clutching a telescope harkens to the squadron’s long history of reconnaissance missions. On May 9, 2017, the 15th ATKS celebrated their 100-year anniversary and reflected on the unit’s extensive and honorable heritage, which coincidentally includes their use of airpower in nearly every major conflict of the 20th century. This heritage is continues today with the MQ-1 Predators.
0 5/12
2017
An MQ-9 Reaper is loaded with a GBU-12 laser-guided bomb on the left and a GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition on the right April 13, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The JDAM is a GPS guided munition which brings added capability to the warfighters, specifically by aircrews being able to employ weapons through inclement weather. The first two GBU-38s employed in training successfully hit their targets May 1, 2017, over the Nevada Test and Training Range. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen) MQ-9 Reapers add to arsenal with first GBU-38 drop
Airmen from the 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing, here, and the 26th Weapons Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, made history earlier this week, by employing the first GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition from an MQ-9 Reaper.
0 5/08
2017
Default Air Force Logo First combat MQ-1, MQ-9 wing celebrates 10 years at Creech AFB
The 432nd Wing celebrated their 10th anniversary at Creech Air Force Base as a combat remotely piloted aircraft wing May 1, 2017. In attendance was Gen. Mike Holmes, the Air Combat Command commander, Col. Case Cunningham, the 432nd WG/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing commander, and 400 Airmen of the wing.
0 5/05
2017
Staff Sgt. Semaj, 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron supply craftsman, displays her back pose March 27, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. Semaj is a nationally qualified amateur bodybuilder competing in the figure category. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Airman balanced through bodybuilding
As Staff Sgt. Semaj’s alarm screeches throughout her bedroom at 2:30 a.m., she wakes for her morning cardio session, checks on her 6-year-old son, Jamel, and then laces up her running shoes. Semaj, a 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron supply craftsman, does this every morning to keep her body in shape in preparation for her next bodybuilding event where she hopes to earn her professional status.
0 5/02
2017
In 2016, 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing MQ-1B Predator and MQ-9 Reaper aircrews assisted coalition partners in the reclamation of Manbij, Syria, from Islamic State of Iraq and Syria forces. Pilots and sensor operators assigned to squadrons across the 432nd Wing and the 432nd Air Expeditionary Wing provided the close air support and reconnaissance needed for coalition partners to drive ISIS fighters out of the city. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen) MQ-1, MQ-9 aircrews help liberate Manbij
In 2016, U.S. Air Force MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper aircrews assisted coalition partners in the reclamation of Manbij, Syria, from Islamic State of Iraq and Syria forces. Pilots and sensor operators assigned to squadrons across the 432nd Wing and the 432nd Air Expeditionary Wing provided the close air support and reconnaissance needed for coalition partners to drive ISIS fighters out of the city.
0 4/06
2017
Master Sgt. Alejandro Medina, 571st Mobility Support Advisory Squadron air advisor, takes a picture with his daughter Senior Airman Giannina, sensor operator at Creech AFB, Nevada, during a training mission at La Aurora Air Base, Guatemala. Air advising, it’s a family affair
Growing up watching her father put the uniform on day in and day out motivated her to follow in his footsteps and become an Airman, but she never imagined she would get the opportunity to serve alongside her hero.
0 4/06
2017
An MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft awaits maintenance on the flightline Feb. 1, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. RPAs are used in various missions to provide combatant commanders with persistent, dominant attack capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kristan Campbell) 11th ATKS paves way with training
To accomplish flight, two geographically separate aircrews work together: the mission control element and the launch and recovery element. The MCE is responsible for executing the mission, while the LRE conducts takeoffs and landings. While being MCE certified is standard for all aircrews flying the MQ-1 and MQ-9, LR certification requires extra training.
0 3/29
2017
A U.S. Air Force MQ-9 Reaper awaits maintenance Dec. 8, 2016, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The MQ-1 Predator has provided many years of service and the time has come for the Air Force to transition to the more capable MQ-9 exclusively, and retire the MQ-1 in early 2018 to keep up with the continuously evolving battlespace environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen) AF to retire MQ-1, transition to MQ-9
For the past 21 years, the Air Force has flown the MQ-1 Predator remotely piloted aircraft in combat, and for the last 10, the MQ-9 Reaper. Combined with a skilled aircrew, these aircraft provide consistent support in daily engagements making an impact downrange.
0 2/24
2017
An MQ-1 Predator flies overhead during a training mission Dec. 12, 2016, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The MQ-1 and the MQ-9 Reaper, help operators provide unique and unmatched situational awareness on the battlefield due to their exceptionally long loiter times. The aircraft can stay in the air for approximately 23 hours attributing to their glider construction, lightweight composite builds and efficient engines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Eye in the sky: MQ-1, MQ-9s provide increased awareness
Situational awareness is the ability to know what is happening around a person at any given time. This is especially important for military members, more specifically, troops on the ground. For the men and women operating MQ-1B Predator and MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft, their skills of providing unmatched SA is highly demanded from the ground forces to the combatant commanders.
0 1/28
2017
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