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The Soyuz MS-04 rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan April 20, 2017, carrying Fyodor Yurchikhin, the Expedition 51 Soyuz commander of Roscosmos, and Col. Jack Fischer, the Expedition 51 NASA flight engineer, into orbit to begin their four and a half month mission on the International Space Station. (NASA photo/Aubrey Gemignani) Astronaut Airman launched to International Space Station
On April 20, 2017, Col. Jack D. Fischer became the most recent American Airman to travel to space in support of the International Space Station mission. He was joined in flight by Fyodor Yurchikin, a Russian cosmonaut.
0 4/20
2017
Dr. Dan Mackney, a senior chemist with the Air Force Technical Applications Center, Patrick AFB, Fla., gives directions to his co-workers as they transfer mass spectrometry equipment from a truck onto a mobile trolley to position it in a science lab at Eastern Florida State College March 17, 2017. The school requested Mackney’s expertise and help with setting up the donated equipment. Pictured from left to right: Mackney, Bart Scarbro, Dr. Richard Reich and Pete Oliveri. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Susan A. Romano) One scientist’s trash is another school’s treasure
As the old proverb goes, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. More simply put, what one person may consider worthless, another may consider quite valuable.
0 4/06
2017
Dr. Benji Maruyama, a senior materials research engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Functional Materials Division, stands by the AFRL’s Autonomous Research System, which uses artificial intelligence to design, execute and analyze experiments at a pace much faster than traditional scientific research methods. The robotic research machine is revolutionizing materials science research and demonstrates the benefits of human-machine interaction for rapid advancement and development of knowledge today. (U.S. Air Force photo/Marisa Novobilski) AFRL system revolutionizes research process
The Autonomous Research System (ARES) may not look like “Johnny Five,” the famous robot from the 1986 movie “Short Circuit,” but this robot’s ability to integrate robotics, artificial intelligence (AI) and data science is altering materials research in a big way at Air Force Research Laboratory. The AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Directorate’s
0 10/22
2016
A new type of flexible body armor developed through a collaborative effort between the Air Force and the Naval Research Laboratory is 50 percent lighter than current body armor. The design makes the use of a ceramic ball matrix encapsulated in foam material, which is then backed with multiple layers of polyethylene sheets. (U.S. Air Force photo/Marisa Novobilski) Flexing in the line of fire: Lightweight, flexible body armor for the future force
In the line of fire, protective body armor plays a critical role in survival. Hard-plated, rigid and heavy, today’s National Institute of Justice Type IV body armor -- the kind that protects warfighters against armor piercing bullets -- defends the wearer, but adds weight and bulk that a fast-moving operator could do without.
0 10/14
2016
Maj. Gen. Roger Teague, director of space programs, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for acquisition, presents an award to Sirius Potatoes from Palos Verdes Peninsula High School in Rolling Hills Estates, Calif., April 14, 2016, in Colorado Springs, Colo. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kevin Gooder) Sirius Potatoes wins StellarXplorers STEM competition
Sirius Potatoes, a team from Palos Verdes Peninsula High School in Rolling Hills Estates, California, recently won the StellarXplorers space system design competition at the Space Foundation’s 32nd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs.
0 5/18
2016
Dolli Lane, a 96th Medical Group laboratory technician, reviews a sample through the microscope Nov.19, 2015, at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. Lane spotted a rare spirally twisted bacteria when reviewing a sick patient’s malaria smear. The sample provided by the 96th MDG lab was the first human blood sample of a spirochete bacteria, known to cause tick-borne relapsing fever, to be cultured at the Centers for Disease Control. (U.S. Air Force photo/Ilka Cole) Eglin medical group first to find bacteria unseen in humans
The 96th Medical Group's laboratory provided the first human blood sample of a spirochete bacteria, known to cause tick-borne relapsing fever, to be cultured at the Centers for Disease Control.
1 1/13
2016
Staff Sgt. Dana Walker uses a kestrel meter to gauge wind and temperature readings from the official observing location, the most unobstructed view of the airfield, painted on the runway at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Dec. 28, 2014. Walker is a weather forecaster assigned to the 3rd Operations Support Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Robert Barnett) Airman continues the family business
Staff Sgt. Dana Walker is from a family focused on science. Her father and her siblings have careers in different science fields and Walker herself chose to become a meteorologist in the Air Force.
0 1/09
2015
Academy cadets pose near the Royal Palace in Phom Penh, Cambodia, this summer. The team, led by Col. Marty France, Astronautics Department head, traveled to Cambodia through the Academy's cultural immersion program. (Courtesy photo) Academy's international programs bring education, diversity to life
International education programs not only allow Academy cadets here to study different languages and cultures in different pockets of the world, but also to cultivate foreign relationships that track back 45 years.
0 11/16
2014
Academy Cadets 1st Class Max Johnson and Kyle Morse repack an airdrop practice model Nov. 6, 2014, at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colo. The model was created by a 2014 capstone project team working to mathematically model wind shear and speed to decrease the cost and increase the accuracy of combat zone airdrops. (U.S. Air Force photo) Academy cadets work to improve airdrop accuracy, aircrew communication
When Academy cadets become pilots, engineers or logisticians, they will know their research here helped make several positive changes for aircrews, their planes and ground troops.
0 11/11
2014
Default Air Force Logo Air Force uses lasers to preserve space history
Cape Canaveral's Launch Complex 14 is best known as the launch site for NASA's "Friendship 7," the flight that brought John Glenn fame as the first American to orbit the Earth in 1962. Now, more than 50 years later, the complex and other National Historic Landmarks are rapidly falling into decay. Challenged by limited funding for major preservation projects, the Air Force has turned to cutting-edge technology to document and preserve Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's historic launch structures, before it's too late.
0 9/03
2014
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