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Jefferson Stewart, engineer with Technology Innovations at Arnold Air Force Base, looks through a microscope at one of the parts recently fabricated using additive manufacturing. Stewart and other members of the Technology Innovations Branch have been looking at additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing of metals, as a way to make hardware needed for AEDC operations. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Deidre Ortiz) Additive manufacturing capability could generate future efficiencies and cost-savings
Additive manufacturing, a process commonly known as three-dimensional printing, describes technologies that build 3-D objects by adding layers. Team members in the Technology Innovation Branch at Arnold Air Force Base are looking at AM as a way to create efficiencies and cost-savings for the Arnold AFB Engineering Development Complex.
0 5/09
2018
We really do have the technology: 3-D printing takes wounded warriors to a new dimension 3-D printing takes wounded warriors to a new dimension
One wounded warrior wanted to amble around the hotel pool during his honeymoon without strapping on prosthetic legs. Another wanted ice skates to fit snugly onto his prosthetic feet so he’d receive the sensory feedback he’d come to expect when engaging in his favorite pastime. And yet another wanted to hold a fishing rod while enjoying full use of the hook where his hand used to be.
0 11/03
2017
hybrid-3-d printing AFRL, Harvard researchers invent new hybrid 3-D printing method for flexible electronics
A collaboration between scientists at the Air Force Research Laboratory and Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has resulted in a new method for digital design and printing of stretchable, flexible electronics. The process, called Hybrid 3-D printing, uses additive manufacturing to integrate soft, conductive inks with a material substrate to create stretchable, wearable electronic devices.
0 10/17
2017
Dr. Mark Benedict, a senior materials engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, discusses the potential for additive manufacturing of aircraft components in metal. The complex geometry of the rocket nozzle benefits from the use of additive manufacturing due to its complex, specialized design. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Marisa Alia-Novobilski) Embracing opportunity: Additive technology used for manufacturing
It’s a materials scientist’s dream, but as some experts say, an engineer’s nightmare. For scientists and engineers at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, additive manufacturing, also known as 3-D printing, can be a powerful tool for rapid innovation.
0 1/09
2017
Default Air Force Logo AF researching advanced manufacturing techniques for replacement parts
The Air Force Research Laboratory has awarded a $10 million research project for refining the efficiency of Air Force aircraft part replacements to the America Makes - National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute in Youngstown, Ohio.
0 8/01
2016
Martin Williams, the 76th Commodities Maintenance Group engineering branch chief, shows parts made using 3-D printing technology in the reverse engineering and critical tooling cell to Dr. Charles Bunting, associate dean of Research and Sponsored Programs at Oklahoma State University, and Dr. Burns Hargis, OSU president, during a tour of OC-ALC engineering and software facilities Oct. 7, 2015. (Air Force photo/Kelly White) Planning a larger role for 3-D printing
The Oklahoma City Air Logistics Complex is finalizing a strategic plan to integrate 3-D printing technology into nearly every aspect of its airpower sustainment mission.
0 10/19
2015
Tracy Rycroft uses a laser scanner to capture part dimensions used to construct a 3-D model. After programming, the printer can run on its own 24 hours a day without manning. Rycroft is a 573rd Commodities Maintenance Squadron mechanical engineering technician. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tommie Horton) 3-D printer creates models that save time, money
As the intricacies of 3-D printing became more widespread, its capabilities have gained traction in the 402nd Commodities Maintenance Group at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia.
0 1/30
2015
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