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From Basic Training to Al Udeid, Two Air Force careers reunited after 21 years Basic Training to Al Udeid: Two Air Force careers reunited after 21 years
It all started in 1996. One kid from Prattville, Alabama, and another from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, took a bus to Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. They were both a little scared and excited to become the U.S. Air Force’s newest Airmen. Though they grew up about 400 miles apart and spent six weeks together in the same flight at Basic Military Training, their Air Force journeys separated them after graduation by thousands of miles and trips around the world.
0 1/05
2018
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Juan Ortiz, an explosive ordnance disposal technician with the 379th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron EOD flight, controls a PACBOT bomb disposal robot from inside a mine resistant ambush protected all-terrain vehicle at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, March 21, 2017. Ortiz was working a nighttime operations scenario during exercise “Vigilant Walrus” in order to train for bomb threats while using night vision capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Miles Wilson) Playing with fire; EOD technicians hone response skills
Most of the crew is asleep, but for a few members. Outside, the sun is peaking over the horizon, sending long shadows across the terrain and buildings. Suddenly a loud banging from the door echoes through the hallway, breaking the silence and waking up the crew. The banging continues, and an Airman opens the door to discover a panic-stricken Airman holding onto her uniform blouse, wires protruding from various pockets and a loud ticking noise coming from her back. Immediately the Airman who opened the door recognizes the threat: a hostage outfitted with a bomb vest.
0 3/28
2017
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Chris Hayes, a Bounty Hunter crew chief, and U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Lucas Woods, a defensive space control maintainer, both with the 379th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron, manually redirect an antenna at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, Jan. 30, 2017. These antennas are an Operation Silent Sentry asset and help find and locate electromagnetic interference in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Miles Wilson) Silent Sentry: Defending the final frontier
Air, space and cyberspace - these are the three domains that the United States Air Force strives to defend. Of these domains, space has become one of the most crowded and competitive. At any given time, there are innumerable signals being transmitted to and from satellites, with each signal taking up space in the electromagnetic spectrum.
0 3/03
2017
A U.S. Air Force Airman with the 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron guides an Airman driving a Tunner 60K cargo loader at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, Dec. 12, 2016. The 8th EAMS expertise in transportation and logistics enable them to inspect, temporarily store and load cargo such as munitions, blood, special operations cargo, hazardous materials, vehicles and medical supplies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cynthia A. Innocenti) Air mobility squadron expedites the fight
“You need it, we move it.” That is the saying of Airmen with the 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron who enable rapid global mobility every day here at one of U.S. Central Command’s busiest en route stations.
0 12/27
2016
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