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An A-10 Thunderbolt II shoots a flare off after receiving fuel from a 340th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron KC-135 Stratotanker in support of Operation Inherent Resolve Oct. 6, 2017. The aircraft can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate in low ceiling and visibility conditions. The wide combat radius, and short takeoff and landing capabilities, permit operations in and out of locations near front lines. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Michael Battles) AF Week in Photos
This week's photos feature Airmen from around the globe involved in activities supporting expeditionary operations and defending America. This weekly feature showcases the men and women of the Air Force.
0 10/13
2017
U.S. Air Force Capt. James Dunham, an intensive care ward nurse at Craig Joint Theater Hospital, checks the vitals of a patient at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, May 3, 2017. As a nurse, Dunham is the link between the patient and doctor. They are responsible for ensuring medicine is administered, pain is managed and attending to the patient in any way they can. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Gonsier) Care under fire: Nurses provide medical, emotional support for those in need
A doctor’s office can induce feelings of uncertainty and anguish, but those emotions quickly fade away when a warmhearted nurse greets you. Whether the nurse is checking your pulse or taking blood, their hospitality quickly puts patients at ease. In a deployed environment, where stress levels are through the roof, hospitality can mean everything to a patient who is recovering from a gunshot wound or was caught in a roadside bomb blast.
0 5/09
2017
Retired Maj. Spike Nasmyth, speaks with Airmen during a lunch July 8, 2015, at Royal Air Force Mildenhall, England. Nasmyth spoke about how prisoners of war communicated with one another in the camp by tapping messages on the walls. He was a POW for more than six years. (U.S. Air Force photo/Gina Randall) Optimism helped Vietnam vet survive as POW
When 2nd Lt. John "Spike" Nasmyth climbed into his F-4 Phantom II on Sept. 4, 1966, to fly a combat mission over Vietnam, he never foresaw that he'd be blown out of the sky by a surface-to-air missile. The last words he heard before his jet was transformed into a lump of crumpled, metal wreckage were from his "guy in back," Ray Salzurulo, a pilot systems operator -- "Hey, Spike -- here comes another..."
2 7/20
2015
U.S. Air Force Airmen from the 17 Special Tactics Squadron out of Fort Benning, Georgia, control airspace operations, during Exercise Jaded Thunder Oct. 29, 2014 in Salina, Kansas. Joint special operations forces, including the U.S. Air Force's 17th Special Tactics Squadron, are training together in Exercise Jaded Thunder to ensure high proficiency for deployment requirements. The 17th STS of the 24th Special Operations Wing provides precision air strikes for join ground special operation forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman James Richardson) 5,000 days of war
It’s been 5,000 days of struggle, rugged landscapes, blood and sweat. It’s been 5,000 days of exhaustion, injuries, and long separations from family, friends and home. On June 27, the 17th Special Tactics Squadron marked 5,000 days of unremitting war.
0 7/01
2015
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