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PARWAN PROVINCE, Afghanistan -- Staff Sgt. John Golden hands an Afghan child a stuffed animal and coloring book during an adopt-a-village trip here.  Airmen from the 455th Air Expeditionary Wing at nearby Bagram Air Base take part in the program to assist villages in Afghanistan with infrastructure, fresh water, school supplies and toys for children.  Sergeant Golden is an aerospace ground equipment technician with the 455th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron and is deployed from Pope Air Force Base, N.C.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. Mark D. Gibson) Airmen donate supplies to Afghans
About 50 Airmen recently volunteered to organize a container filled with nearly 63,000 pounds of donated supplies for an additional mission here -- the adoption of a village.Airman sorted the supplies into groups for males, females, adults and children. The Airmen then traveled to a village several miles outside Bagram to distribute the supplies.
0 6/30
2005
LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Va. -- Lt. Col. Wade Tolliver delivers the second permanent F/A-22 Raptor here June 8.  Shortly after, Maj. Charles Corcoran delivered the base's third Raptor.  Colonel Tolliver is the 27th Fighter Squadron director of operations, and Major Corcoran is a pilot with the squadron.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Ben Bloker) Langley offers mix of new, old aircraft
When Air Force officials assigned the futuristic F/A-22 Raptor here, its first operational base, the service’s future met its past.Putting the next-generation air superiority fighter at the oldest continuously active air base in the United States provides a striking contrast. It is like seeing a computer on a desk next to an abacus, or like
0 6/27
2005
SOUTHWEST ASIA -- Capt. Matt Bertelli taxis to the runway at a forward-deployed location.  He recently dropped a 2,000-pound joint-direct attack munition on two football-field sized bunkers filled with insurgent ordnance and improvised explosive device paraphenalia.  He is an F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot with the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Mark Moore) Drop ‘em or not, pilots help ground troops
The alarm went of precisely at 1:30 a.m., just as planned. Capt. Matt Bertelli scrambled out of bed and across the hall to knock on the door of his wingman, Maj. Tray Siegfried. Time to go to work in Southwest Asia.The two F-16 Fighting Falcon pilots of the 125th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at a forward-deployed location settle into a routine
0 6/27
2005
CAMP MACKALL, N.C. -- Combat Control School students practice pulling security during a field exercise here.  All students must meet rigorous standards to graduate the course and earn the right to wear the scarlet beret.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Lisa Terry McKeown) Airmen train to wear scarlet beret
Every service in the military has its elite force. The Army has green berets and the Navy has SEALS. In the Air Force, the tip of the spear lies with combat controllers. Out of the 19,000 Air Force Special Operations Command Airmen, only 375 can claim the coveted title of combat controller.They are certified air traffic controllers who connect
0 6/24
2005
SEVERNA PARK, Md. -- Chief Master Sgt. David Hamel runs in his 60th marathon here recently.  He finished the race in 4 hours, 37.50 seconds -- an average 11 minutes, 35 second pace per mile.  Unlike other marathons, this was a trail run that covered rolling hills, rural back roads and bike trails.  Chief Hamel has run 61 marathons in 35 states.  He is working his way toward not only finishing at least one marathon in each state, but to complete 100 marathons.  He is assigned to the 23rd Maintenance Squadron at Pope Air Force Base, N.C.  (U.S. Air Force photo) From 1.5 miles to 61 marathons
Once a year, all active-duty Airmen head outside to the track to tackle the 1.5-mile run as part of the annual physical fitness test. It is an event not everyone looks forward to. For some, running is something to do only when tested or being chased, but for an Airman here, pounding the pavement has become a way of life.Chief Master Sgt. David
0 6/17
2005
HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Mass. -- Connor Tierney celebrates his fourth birthday at the child development center here.  He was recently diagnosed with a rare lung disease called bronchiolitis obliterans caused by treatments for the leukemia he was diagnosed with at 4 months old.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Nicole Picariello) Courage embodied by Hanscom child
When you look in Connor Tierney's big, blue eyes and watch him interact with family and friends, you would not think the 4-year-old has experienced much difficulty in his short life. But when you come to know his story, you realize this little boy is all about courage.Connor, the son of 2nd Lt. William Tierney, of the Electronic Systems Center’s
0 6/16
2005
HICKAM AIR FORCE BASE, Hawaii -- Tech. Sgt. Greg Price attaches an oil line to a pro street chopper he is building to show in the 3rd Annual Choppers-Only Show in Honolulu.  This is the 14th bike he has built in the past four years.  He is a C-40B aircraft crew chief with the 15th Airlift Maintenance Squadron here.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Martin Jackson) Sergeant’s love of steel, paint creates rolling artwork
It has been said that clothing styles repeat themselves, and motorcycles seem to be no different. Tricked-out choppers with stretched frames, custom tanks and tons of chrome are back by popular demand.These custom choppers are so popular that several television series are dedicated to how they are built. However, because of their popularity these
0 6/14
2005
Default Air Force Logo A journey to the edge
Time was passing into the next day, and he was destroyed … just completely gone.His thoughts lingered on the details.“Do I want an open or closed casket? Where should I shoot?”He cocked the gun several times as he laid in bed ready to make his last move.“Who would care?”March 23 was the last time Tech. Sgt. Kevin Hainsel planned to see daylight.
0 6/10
2005
Default Air Force Logo Airmen form tight-knit team that fuels fight
Nobody bats an eye when an Airman in the petroleum, oil and lubrication shop passes gas roughly three or four times daily because it is absolutely essential.Without the 17 Airmen in the shop, the aircraft at this forward-deployed location do not get off the ground.“Pilots are pedestrians without POL,” said Staff Sgt. Kevin Capach, a fuels
0 6/08
2005
SOUTHWEST ASIA -- Senior Airman Michael Ragsdale demonstrates a portable backup method of obtaining weather readings.  Since weather is vital in flying operations, the weather observers let people know that it is more than just hot, humid and dusty.  Airman Ragsdale is a weather observer with the 380th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron at a forward-deployed location and is from MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Elijah Roberts) Deployed weather observers report more than the obvious
When people think of the job a weather observer has in Southwest Asia, they may believe it would be relatively simple. After all, day after day, it is hot, humid and dusty. What else would there be to report?More than meets the eye, especially when taking into consideration the mission of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing at a forward-deployed
0 6/08
2005
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