Air Force 75th Birthday

 
#AF75
 

For 75 years, American Airmen have excelled as they execute the Air Force mission to fly, fight, and win — delivering airpower anytime, anywhere in defense of our nation.  

Airmen are called to “Innovate, Accelerate and Thrive” as the U.S. Air Force and Department of the Air Force approach their 75th anniversaries on Sept. 18, 2022. Airmen will always be there to provide America with the airpower it needs to defend the nation, deter or defeat our adversaries, reassure our partners and allies, and help diplomacy proceed from a position of strength. 

 

 

 

 
#AF75
 

 

 

AF 75th Birthday INNOVATE

Innovation, fueled by Airmen, is our heritage. Airmen continue to push technological and cultural boundaries which make America the leader in airpower and spacepower. Innovation is an integral part of how we train and employ our squadrons, develop our capabilities, and continue to move toward an even more effective Air Force.

AF 75th Birthday Accelerate

From their inception 75 years ago, the U.S. Air Force and Department of the Air Force have excelled at keeping pace with rapid changes in technology and in the demands placed on the Air Force’s five core missions: air superiority; global strike; rapid global mobility; intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance; and command and control.

AF 75th Birthday Thrive

We are the world’s greatest Air Force because of those who have gone before us – particularly those who weren’t afraid to break barriers. Empowered Airmen are the competitive edge we have over our adversaries and the reason we are the world’s greatest Air Force.

 

75th Anniversary Posters

 

75th Anniversary Videos

Video by Juan Femath
Air Force 75th Anniversary Tattoo Vignette - Innovate
Air Force Television Pentagon (SAF/PAI)
May 1, 2022 | 1:29
Innovation, fueled by Airmen, is our heritage. Airmen continue to push technological and cultural boundaries which make America the leader in airpower and spacepower. Innovation is an integral part of how we train and employ our squadrons, develop our capabilities, and continue to move toward an even more effective Air Force.
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Yesterday, Today and into the future!

This Month in AF History

  • May 21, 1927: Charles A. Lindbergh, a captain in the Missouri National Guard’s 110th Observation Squadron, landed his Ryan Monoplane, the “Spirit of St. Louis,” in Paris May 21, 1927, after the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean. He set a 3,609-mile Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) record for straight-line distance in the 33-hour and 39-minute flight. For this feat, President Calvin Coolidge presented Lindbergh with a special Medal of Honor (not the “Congressional” Medal of Honor).
  •  May 17, 1998: An Air Force Test Center pilot, Lt. Col. Steven M. Rainey, became the first U.S. Air Force pilot to fly the F-22 Raptor. It was the aircraft’s third flight and its first flight at Edwards Air Force Base, California. 
  • May 5, 1996: Col. Betty L. Mullis became the first woman to command a flying wing when she assumed command of the 940th Air Refueling Wing at McClellan AFB, California.
  • May 6, 1970: Neil A. Armstrong and Col. Edwin E. Aldrin and Col. Michael Collins, from Apollo XI, received the Collier Trophy for putting the first man on the moon.
    
  • May 12, 1968: Lt. Col. Joe M. Jackson volunteered to rescue a three-man Air Force combat control team at Kham Duc. Jackson and his crew (Maj. Jesse Campbell, Tech Sgt. Edward M. Trejo, and Staff Sgt. Manson L. Grubbs) landed their C-123 under intense, hostile fire but were forced to take off. Making a second attempt, also under hostile conditions, Jackson landed his C-123 Provider, extracted the combat controllers, and returned to safety. For his valiant effort, Jackson received the Medal of Honor, the only air lifter so honored in the Vietnam Conflict. Campbell received the Air Force Cross, while Trejo and Grubbs earned Silver Stars.
  • May 6, 1967: Strategic Air Command flew its 10,000th B-52 Stratofortress mission in Southeast Asia. By this time, the B-52s had dropped over 190,000 tons of bombs in combat operations.
  • May 16, 1940: President Roosevelt asked for the production of 50,000 planes a year.
    

AF Legends: GENERAL HENRY. H. ARNOLD

GENERAL HENRY. H. ARNOLDGeneral of the Air Force. Pioneer airman who was taught to fly by the Wright Brothers, and commander of Army Air Forces in victory over Germany and Japan in World War II: born Gladwyne, Pa., June 25, 1886, died Sonoma, Calif., Jan. 15, 1950. "Hap" Arnold, as he was fondly known and called, dating from his early days at West Point, was in the class of 1907 at the U.S. Military Academy. From then on his life paralleled the growth of America's air power and he personally contributed to most of the major milestones of development during the long period until he retired in 1946. Three years later, by act of Congress, he received permanent five-star rank as general of the Air Force, the first such commission ever granted.

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The Air Force 75th Anniversary Theme

379th Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs