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Air Force, Army work together during EOD training

HOLLOMAN AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. (AFNS) -- Explosive ordnance disposal team members, assigned to the Army’s 734th Explosive Ordnance Company at Fort Bliss, Texas, participated in a joint training exercise with the 49th Civil Engineer Squadron EOD flight at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, Feb. 14.

“Any chance we get to conduct joint training with the Army benefits both sides,” said Master Sgt. John Johnson, a 49th CES EOD team leader.

During the training, the 734th EOD team received a tour of the F-16 Fighting Falcon, a key aircraft supported here.

“We went over how we would approach and deal with the F-16 during a ground emergency situation and safety precautions we would apply at the time,” Johnson said.

Following the aircraft tour, the 734th was given a brief on the aircraft, things to expect while working on the aircraft, and some hazards that may occur.

“They don’t really get a chance to get on the birds and really see what they’re about so we invited them up,” said Senior Airman Levi Phillips, a 49th CES EOD technician. “We went and showed them the pinning procedures how to make it safe, possible munitions it may have on board, and let them get some hands on experience with the aircraft.”

Technicians from the 734th and the 49th come together often to better understand their different missions and further develop their acquired skills.

“Their expertise in different fields varies from what ours do so it’s good to be able to get a mix of ideas, perspectives, and training techniques with the different branches,” Phillips said. “It was good to have them come out and actually get on the aircraft. It gives us a chance to teach others so they can be qualified and know what to expect.”