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MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. (AFPN) -- Merry Debbrecht, the "Rose Hill Cookie Lady," pulls another batch of fresh cookies out of her oven. To show her support to the American military, she bakes a minimum of 20 dozen cookies every day and sends them to deployed troops. Since February 2005, she has baked more than 30,000 cookies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kristine Dreyer)          Rose Hill Cookie Lady sends more than 30,000 cookies overseas
Three Airmen received some “sweet” support from the “Rose Hill Cookie Lady” while they were deployed.Since Feb. 5, Merry Debbrecht, nicknamed the Rose Hill Cookie Lady, has baked more than 30,000 cookies for deployed troops all over the world.Mrs. Debbrecht’s baking project began after her grandson, Army Private 1st Class Andrew Webb, deployed
0 9/28
2005
OVER NEW ORLEANS -- Tech. Sgt. Keith Berry looks down into flooded streets searching for survivors.  He is part of an Air Force Reserve team credited with saving more than 1,040 people in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.  He is a pararescueman with the 304th Rescue Squadron from Portland, Ore.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Bill Huntington) A PJ’s night in New Orleans
At the heart of the helicopter rescue portion of the Air Force Reserve Command’s contribution to the Hurricane Katrina relief effort are the crews flying 10 to 12 hour missions picking up as many as 184 survivors on a single mission.At the very center of that heart pararescuemen can be found who have risked life and limb so that others may
0 9/12
2005
ALI BASE, Iraq -- Staff Sgt. John Gladney tests a light gun used to control aircraft if radio communication fails. Sergeant Gladney is an air traffic tower watch supervisor with the 407th Expeditionary Operations Support Squadron and is deployed from Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Maurice Hessel) Air traffic controllers perform dual mission, put fighters on target
Air traffic controllers here are breaking new ground –- or space, as one might say in the air traffic control world.Not only do controllers balance their normal workload of ensuring the safety of civilian airplane traffic in the area, but they also direct fighter aircraft to engage the enemy in the southern third of Iraq.It is a first for the
0 9/12
2005
Default Air Force Logo Lakenheath Airman weathers Hurricane Katrina
The world watched helplessly as Hurricane Katrina decimated the Gulf Coast and left many people homeless or dead. Many people have watched the television news and seen video footage and photographs of the damage to Keesler Air Force Base, Miss., but one Airman here knows what it actually felt like to ride out Hurricane Katrina.Staff Sgt.
0 9/12
2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Staff Sgt. Charles Berry keeps blood and fluids flowing in the operating room as doctors treat a patient injured in an insurgent attack.  The doctors, nurses and other medics with the 447th Expeditionary Medical Squadron here have treated more than 3,000 patients during the past five months.  Sergeant Berry is deployed from Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Brian Davidson) Saving lives, losing lives through eyes of medics
The faces of Air Force medics serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom are often the first, and sometimes the last, seen by those who are left hurt and bleeding by an enemy fighting against peace and freedom. It is these same medics who see the pain and suffering of the injured, and the skill, dedication and compassion of the doctors, nurses and other
0 9/08
2005
OVER IRAQ -- An F-16 Fighting Falcon moves into place behind a KC-135 Stratotanker.  The KC-135 is from the 92nd Air Refueling Wing at Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., and the crew flying it is from McConnell AFB, Kan.  Thirty-five aircraft are refueled on an average day by coalition aircraft.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Justin Jacobs) Air refueling missions essential to ground troops
Airman 1st Class Philip Inmon scoots forward and quickly turns his head back and forth. He is on his stomach, straining to scan left and right at 28,000 feet, looking for the incoming fighter. “I don’t see him,” he said into the headset to the pilot. Through the two panes of glass at the rear of the aircraft, all he can see is brown terrain over
0 9/08
2005
SPANGDAHLEM AIR BASE, Germany -- Staff Sgt. Jamie Bosarge views images of her hometown through the Internet.  Sergeant Bosarge said most of the main areas of her hometown in Pascagoula, Miss., were destroyed by the hurricane and subsequent floods.  She is a network training instructor with the 52nd Communications Squadron here.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Amaani Lyle) Hurricane aftermath extends to Germany
Nineteen years of growing up around the capricious hurricanes of Pascagoula, Miss., kept a staff sergeant here relatively calm upon hearing the news that a surge in the Gulf of Mexico was on the way. But the reality of Hurricane Katrina’s wrath soon set in. Following the devastation and displacement of thousands of hapless victims since the Aug.
0 9/07
2005
POPE AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. -- Senior Airman Elizabeth Larson packs her bags with her desert camouflage uniform and other necessities prior to deploying to support the war on terrorism.  She is a 43rd Comptroller Squadron financial technician here. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Stacia Zachary) Fresh eyes focused on deployment
It has been said by old hats in the Air Force that the service is getting younger by the day. While this may not actually be the case, there is a group of Airmen who are new to both the Air Force and deployments. But they are ready to gain experience in their career fields and in the mission abroad aiding in the war on terrorism.For Senior Airman
0 9/06
2005
F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. -- Tech. Sgt. Shawn Davis (left) puts the finishing touches on the vintage uniform of Chief Master Sgt. Mark Brejcha.  Sergeant Davis is wearing fatigues from the 1970s, and Chief Brejcha is wearing a Korean War-era 505 khaki shirt, worn by his father in 1954.  The sergeants are members of Living Legends, an organization dedicated to preserving and increasing awareness of the Air Force's heritage.  Airmen wear vintage uniforms at Air Force special events and share the history of the person who donated the uniform.  Sergeant Davis is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the 90th Mission Support Squadron's personnel relocation, and Chief Brejcha is the 90th Mission Support Group superintendent.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tessa Cubbon) Living legends celebrate Air Force heritage
Wearing an Air Force uniform from the 1960s is a completely different experience from seeing a black and white picture of one in a text book.Living Legends will soon offer Airmen here the opportunity to experience what it was like to wear heavy cotton khaki uniforms instead of a camouflage battle dress uniform or a service cap instead of a flight
0 9/02
2005
LANGLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Va. -- Senior Airman Mark Leahy (left) and Staff Sgt. Jon Gengnagel are members of the Red Cross disaster assessment team. Airman Leahy is a graphic designer with the 1st Communications Squadron, and Sergeant Gengnagel is a maintenance operation controller with the 1st Maintenance Operations Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Elizabeth Weinberg)                                                         Airmen use emergency vehicles for rescue ops
With 35-inch tires and an 8.5-inch rock crawling lift kit, he could easily run over a Honda Civic.But Staff Sgt. Jonathan Gengnagel’s vehicle is a means to save and protect, not destroy.Although Hurricane Katrina has incited many people to volunteer and donate their time to help those suffering in its wake, it was an earlier storm that first
0 9/01
2005
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