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taking care of Airmen
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Many Airman are unaware what the initial meeting with a mental health provider looks like when they seek PTSD treatment. The goal of the first meeting is to make the patient feel comfortable and to be as transparent as possible about what is going on and what treatment options the patient has. As a result, the patient and mental health provider will more likely have a collaborative and trusting interaction, making PTSD treatment more successful. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care
Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect.
0 6/28
2018
The gift of a kidney bolsters bond between classmates Organ donation bolsters bond between classmates
Col. Dave Ashley’s schedule since May 2017 included climbing a mountain, completing a 40-mile trail run, competing in a multiday athletic event that included bicycling and kayaking and achieving a perfect score on his military physical fitness test, his seventh in a row. Ashley accomplished all of these feats after donating a kidney. What began as an impulse to help a desperately ill former classmate has turned into a campaign to make sure other service members know the Military Health System supports those who want to become living organ donors.
0 11/07
2017
Taking Care of Airmen from the Ground Up CMSAF discusses leadership, dedication, innovation at AFA
Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright laid out his philosophy of developing Airmen as leaders during the Air Force Association’s Air, Space and Cyber Conference Sept. 20, 2017.
0 9/20
2017
Default Air Force Logo Parent groups reach out to cadets from hurricane-struck Gulf Coast
When Hurricane Harvey struck Texas, the North Texas Parent Club “got mobilized” and organized a dinner Sept. 1, 2017, at a Colorado Springs, Colorado restaurant for cadets from the Gulf Coast.
0 8/31
2017
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson shares a laugh with members of the 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, July 19, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. During her visit, Wilson toured the base and gained insight into the dominant persistent attack and reconnaissance mission the Airmen of the 432nd WG complete 24/7/365 for our nation and coalition partners. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) SecAF gets firsthand look at MQ-1, MQ-9 mission
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson visited Creech Air Force Base July 19, 2017 to get a closer look at the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper mission. During her visit Wilson toured the base and gained insight into the dominant persistent attack and reconnaissance mission the Airmen of the 432nd Wing complete 24-7-365 for our nation and coalition partners.
0 7/21
2017
Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt, 23d Wing photojournalist, simulates a field sobriety test, July 7, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. When an Airman receives a driving under the influence charge, they are eligible to receive both a civilian conviction if caught off base, as well as a punishment given at their commander’s discretion. The final sentence could cost thousands of dollars in fines, suspension of their license, negative paperwork, administrative demotion, and possible loss of career or reclassification. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Lauren M. Sprunk) DUI: What it really costs
When an Airman receives a DUI charge, they are eligible to receive both a civilian conviction if caught off base, as well as a punishment given at their commander’s discretion. The final sentence could cost thousands of dollars in fines, suspension of their license, negative paperwork, administrative demotion, and possible loss of career or reclassification.
0 7/12
2017
Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody speaks during a session at the Air Force Association's Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Md., Sept. 21, 2016.  Cody's presentation focused on taking care of Airmen at all levels. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Bryan Franks) Cody: Committed to moving forward
Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James A. Cody conveyed his commitment to taking care of Airmen during the Air Force Association Air, Space and Cyber Conference in National Harbor, Maryland, Sept. 21.
0 9/21
2016
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