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GENERAL DONALD J. KUTYNA

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General Donald J. Kutyna is commander in chief of the North American Aerospace Defense Command and the U.S. Space Command, both headquartered at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo.

General Kutyna was born in 1933, in Chicago, where he graduated from Lane Technical High School in 1951. He attended the University of Iowa for two years and subsequently was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy, graduating with a bachelor of science degree in 1957. The general received a master of science degree in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1965. He completed the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in 1976.

Upon completing pilot training at Vance Air Force Base, Okla., in September 1958, General Kutyna was assigned to the 33rd Bombardment Squadron at March Air Force Base, Calif., serving as a B-47 combat crew commander until June 1963. After graduating from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in June 1965, he was assigned to the Aerospace Research Pilot School, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., first as a student and then as a staff director, training test pilots and astronauts for U.S. aircraft and space programs.

From December 1969 to January 1971 he served a combat tour of duty with the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Takhli Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, completing 120 combat missions in the F-105 tactical fighter. Upon his return from Southeast Asia, the general was assigned to Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C., as a development planner in the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Research and Development. In June 1973, after a tour of duty with the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, he was assigned as executive officer to the undersecretary of the Air Force.

In August 1975 General Kutyna entered the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. After graduation in July 1976, he transferred to Electronic Systems Division, Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., with duty as assistant deputy for international programs. He then served as program manager for foreign military sales of the E-3A Airborne Warning and Control System aircraft and, later, became assistant program director for the overall E-3A program. In June 1980 he was appointed deputy for surveillance and control systems, responsible for the development and acquisition of the sensors and command centers used today by NORAD and the U.S. Space Command in the satisfaction of their worldwide missions.

General Kutyna became deputy commander for space launch and control systems at Space Division, Air Force Systems Command, Los Angeles Air Force Station, Calif., in June 1982. In this position he managed the Department of Defense space shuttle program, including the design and construction of the West Coast space shuttle launch site at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.; the acquisition of space shuttle upper stage boosters; and the operational aspects of launching military payloads on the shuttle.

Other responsibilities encompassed the development, acquisition and launch support of all Air Force expendable launch vehicles, including the Titan and Atlas space boosters and the new Titan IV heavy lift launch vehicle, which provides a capability equivalent to the space shuttle. His programs for control of space missions encompassed the operations and upgrade of the Air Force satellite control network, and development of Air Force Space Command's Consolidated Space Operations Center, Falcon Air Force Station, Colo.

In June 1984 the general became director of space systems and command, control and communications, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, Research, Development and Acquisition, at Air Force headquarters. After the loss of the space shuttle Challenger in January 1986, General Kutyna was appointed to serve as a member of the presidential commission investigating that accident and spearheaded the effort to bring expendable launch vehicles back into the nation's space inventory.

General Kutyna returned to Los Angeles Air Force Station as vice commander of Space Division in June 1986, overseeing all space system acquisitions, with particular emphasis on programs associated with the Strategic Defense Initiative.

In November 1987 the general became commander of the Air Force Space Command, the newest major command in the Air Force, with headquarters at Peterson Air Force Base. General Kutyna's forces conducted missile warning, space surveillance and satellite control operations at 46 locations around the world. He assumed his present command in April 1990.

The general is a command pilot with more than 4,500 flying hours in 25 different fighters and bombers. His military awards and decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster, Distinguished Flying Cross with oak leaf cluster, Air Medal with eight oak leaf clusters, and Air Force Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters. He received the National Geographic Society's General Thomas D. White U.S. Air Force Space Trophy in June 1987. The award is given to the individual who has made the most outstanding contribution to the nation's progress in space.

He was promoted to general April 1, 1990, with same date of rank.

(Current as of January 1991)

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