HomeNewsArticle Display

Flexible service: Individual Reserve offers unique opportunities

Col. Elizabeth Chamberlain, the Individual Mobilization Augmentee to the director of intelligence at 7th Air Force, brings a broad perspective on Air Force life and a specific knowledge of planned targeting to her intelligence community. In addition to her duties as an intelligence officer, this mother of two is a military spouse who actively volunteers with a number of women's leadership organizations, serves as an Air Force Academy Liaison Officer, and is actively involved in her community and kid's school. (U.S. Air Force Photo)

Col. Elizabeth Chamberlain, the Individual Mobilization Augmentee to the director of intelligence at Seventh Air Force, brings a broad perspective on Air Force life and a specific knowledge of planned targeting to her intelligence community. In addition to her duties as an intelligence officer, this mother of two is a military spouse who actively volunteers with a number of women's leadership organizations, serves as an U.S. Air Force Academy liaison officer, and is actively involved in her community and child's school. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Tech. Sgt. Mark Parker, an Individual Mobilization Augmentee with the 673rd Security Forces Squadron, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, is also a police officer with the Prescott, Arizona, police department. Parker credits the flexibility of the Individual Reserve program with enabling him to continue to serve in the Air Force.

Tech. Sgt. Mark Parker, an Individual Mobilization Augmentee with the 673rd Security Forces Squadron at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, is also a police officer with the Prescott Police Department in Arizona. Parker credits the flexibility of the Individual Reserve program with enabling him to continue to serve in the Air Force. ( Courtesy photo illustration)

BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFNS) -- When Tech. Sgt. Mark Parker first enlisted in the Air Force as a security forces Airman in 2001, he already knew his long-term goal was to become a civilian law enforcement officer. After serving four years on active duty, which included a deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, he was ready to pursue his civilian goals but didn’t want to entirely let go of the military.

“The Individual Mobilization Augmentee Program gave me the opportunity to have both,” said Parker, who is assigned to the 673rd Security Forces Squadron at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

The IMA Program provides Air Force reservists some unique opportunities. It is actually part of a larger category called the Individual Reserve, which consists of IMAs and members of the Participating Individual Ready Reserve. The program dates back to the beginning of the Air Force Reserve. In 1947, Lt. Gen. George E. Stratemeyer, the first commander of Continental Air Command, a predecessor of today’s Air Force Reserve Command, called for establishing a category of reservists to support the active duty during times of crisis. Stratemeyer established the mobilization assignee program, and the Individual Reserve was born.

Today, the IR program is managed by the Headquarters Individual Reservist Readiness and Integration Organization (HQ RIO) located at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado. It consists of approximately 7,200 reservists, representing nearly every Air Force specialty code and rank, who augment more than 50 major commands, combatant commands and government agencies.

To oversee this diverse population of individuals, HQ RIO comprises seven geographically separated detachments and eight operating locations. These locations manage assigned IRs on a daily basis to meet Air Force and combatant commander requirements.

Unlike traditional reservists, who serve their minimum requirement of one weekend a month and two weeks a year with their assigned Reserve unit, IMAs are assigned to active-duty units and have flexible schedules. IMAs coordinate with their unit of assignment to create a training schedule that meets the needs of both them and the organization. In some cases, IMAs complete all of their annual participation requirements in consecutive days; or, they can do so in smaller increments dispersed throughout the year, typically during the week versus weekends.

IRs support both the peacetime and wartime missions of their active-duty organization. Their primary role is to provide backfill support for their unit when needed, but they can also volunteer their services to support exercises, contingencies, deployments, and other needs throughout the Air Force and the Defense Department.

IMAs are assigned to funded positions and participate with their active-duty unit for 24 to 36 days each year, depending on their career field. They receive standard pay, benefits and points toward retirement. On the other hand, members of the PIRR are assigned to unfunded billets and participate for retirement points only. These reservists often serve as Air Force Academy liaison officers or with the Civil Air Patrol.

One aspect of the IR program that Parker cited as being important to him is the flexibility afforded when balancing his military schedule with his civilian job. Unlike traditional reservists, IRs work closely with their active-duty supervisors to create a customized duty schedule. Parker said the set monthly unit training assembly schedule TRs must adhere to wouldn’t work with his civilian career as a law enforcement officer.

“If it weren’t for the program, I don’t think I would be able to stay in the military,” he said.

Parker, a civilian police officer in Prescott, Arizona, also specializes in impaired driver enforcement and is a certified traffic crash reconstructionist. He lends these skills to the security forces Airmen at JB Elmendorf-Richardson. During his annual training, he conducts different educational events for his Airmen, instructing them on how to utilize speed-measuring devices and identify impaired drivers. He also teaches a course that certifies JB Elmendorf-Richardson's patrolmen to administer field sobriety tests to possibly impaired drivers.

"I really enjoy teaching and interacting with the new Airmen," Parker said. "It’s very rewarding knowing that I am able to provide the Air Force with no-cost training, and the patrolmen are always so motivated to go out and apply what they have just learned. It reminds me of myself when I was on active duty."

Chief Master Sgt. Timothy Lehane, another security forces IMA, also shared his sentiments on why he became an IMA.

“I became an IMA because my state police duty schedule did not line up with the weekend drill schedule, and it was difficult getting time off,” said Lehane, a 15-year veteran of the Connecticut State Police. “I continue to stay because of the flexibility, and I can still contribute to the Air Force mission.”

There are a wide variety of opportunities for IRs in today’s Air Force. In addition to augmenting positions around the globe, real-world missions and deployments are frequently available. Majs. Robert C. Rogers and Kyle Johnson both had opportunities to support the fight against the Ebola virus in West Africa.

In 2015, Johnson, who was serving on active-duty orders as a communications squadron detachment commander, deployed to the Barclay Training Center in Monrovia, Liberia. He led his team of more than 30 civilian and military command-and-control specialists to establish a deployed communications system to serve as the nerve center for Operation United Assistance.

He and his team set up some of the most sophisticated tactical communications equipment available, forward-deployed equipment, and provided network support and help desk functions.

Rogers played an entirely different role at the tail end of Operation United Assistance. He was serving as branch chief of the airfield pavement evaluation team at the Air Force Civil Engineering Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, when his small, elite unit of engineers was called to evaluate the tarmac at the Roberts International Airport in Liberia during the drawdown of the Defense department operations there.

“Our mission was to document the end condition of the runway following operations,” Rogers said. “We found out that the Air Force did not cause additional damage to the airfield. Our structural testing showed that the underlying layers are stronger than previously reported and don’t need a full overhaul.”

Rogers was able to present his findings directly to the U.S. ambassador to Liberia. He felt it was the most fulfilling mission of his career.

The IR program has positions available to members coming off active duty, TRs and troops from sister services. Airmen can use the Reserve Vacancy tool in AFPC (Air Force Personnel Center) Secure (available through the Air Force Portal) to find IR positions. Others who are interested in the IR program can contact an Air Force Reserve recruiter for information on current openings. Visit www.afreserve.com to find a recruiter.

Additional information about the IR program is available here.

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @AirForceMag: #AVGEEK ALERT: The @AFThunderbirds will join some of the finest flyers from the US and UK militaries—including the @USNavy
RT @starsandstripes: "Sesame Street" is offering resources to help the youngest members of military families navigate the changes that come…
RT @Space_Station: .@Astro_Luca and @Astro_Christina are assisting spacewalkers @AstroHague and @AstroDrewMorgan before the duo exits the s…
RT @DVIDSHub: Did you know the B-2 bomber recently had the 30th anniversary of its first flight? Read about an event hosted at @northropgr
RT @48FighterWing: Read about how the #MightyBlackPanthers are sharpening their air interoperability tactics in support of @RoyalAirForce e…
RT @AFSpace: Will you be watching as @usairforce @AstroHague and @USArmy @AstroDrewMorgan head out for their spacewalk today? This is Drew…
RT @F22DemoTeam: CHICAGO. What an incredible weekend. Thanks for all the support and for allowing us to send it over your beautiful skyline…
RT @AFResearchLab: A huge congratulations is in order for Capt. Lisa Fernandez and Javier Rodriguez on winning the Hispanic Engineer Nation…
RT @PACAF: When you join the @usairforce and get @TeamMisawa as your first duty station, that's what we call a good deal! Read about A1C…
RT @HQ_AFMC: #TuesdayThoughts "...This is a matter of committing to something and investing in yourself. If you make that choice and you’r…
RT @AF_Falcons: #CollegeColorsDay is approaching! Rep your 🔵&⚪ on 8/30 Enter for a chance to win giveaways and tickets to the College Foot…
RT @HQUSAFEPA: Today, participants in APF Kenya 2019 started the week-long #partnership event focused on personnel recovery. Maj. Gen. Ogol…
RT @AirmanMagazine: The @CivilAirPatrol and the @usairforce fly "Fertile Keynote" training missions to exercise America's air defense capab…
RT @CitizenAirman: Enlisted aircrew members critical to C-130 Hercules flight testing - https://t.co/RAPxP7CR6E #ReserveReady https://t.co/…
RT @ActingSecAF: Join @VP Pence, @JimBridenstine, me, & more at the National Space Council today at 9:30 am ET. We will discuss #space #inn
#DYK, Patriot Warrior is @USAFReserve's premier exercise, providing an opportunity for Reserve Citizen #Airmen to t… https://t.co/g3mWCOKg7C
RT @AFResearchLab: Q. What's that? A. Just @AFResearchLab turning a Cessna into an #UAV #InnovativeAF details: https://t.co/t6aAMLxJSu…
RT @US_SOCEUR: A U.S. Air Force Logistics Readiness Airman connects fuel hoses to a MC-130J Commando II during Operation Rapid Forge in #Es