An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

'Sex Signals' asks Airmen to re-examine sexual cues

  • Published
  • By Airman 1st Class Alessandra N. Hurley
  • 28th Bomb Wing Public Affairs
Although sexual assault is no laughing matter, Airmen here found a lighthearted way to learn about it during a free show here at the base theater Sept. 2.

"Sex Signals", a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator program production, is a series of various dating scenes performed by professional actors who bring realistic scenes to life and allow Airmen to learn about sexual assault in a lively and realistic way.

"The scenes are set up in an improvisational format," said Shannon Holstein, the 28th Bomb Wing SARC. "The show is basically a comedy sketch based on audience interaction."

Audience participation ranges from shouting out suggestions of pick-up lines for actors to use in the skits, to holding up cards with the word "stop" written on them -- whenever an actor has ignored or misinterpreted either spoken or nonverbal cues from the other actor to leave them alone.

"This is not a briefing," Mrs. Holstein said. "The actors use crass language when they speak, to mirror the way people talk about sex."

Some Airmen said they were concerned the show would be boring. They ended up enjoying the performance by the time it was through.

"I liked it a lot more than I expected when I initially heard of the event," said Airman 1st Class L Johnston, a 28th Security Forces Squadron patrolman. "I personally believe this was quite a productive way to prevent sexual assault among Airmen."

Airman Johnston said the show raised his awareness to the reality of sexual assault.

"It was mind-opening," he said. "To be able to see something live, rather than in a PowerPoint presentation is a more effective way of getting the point across. After watching different possible situations acted out in front of you, if you ever find yourself in a situation which seems eerily similar to the one you witnessed on stage, you can recognize it and stop yourself before doing something terribly wrong."