HomeNewsArticle Display

KMC medics implant AF’s 1st Micra TPS

Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, on Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a new type of heart device that provides patients with the most advanced pacing technology at one-tenth the size of a traditional pacemaker. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, an 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a new type of heart device that provides patients with the most advanced pacing technology at one-tenth the size of a traditional pacemaker. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kemberly Groue)

Medics prepare a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System for patient insertion at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, on Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. The pacing system is about the size of a vitamin and the same weight as a penny. (U.S. Air Force photo by Katie Hursey)

Medics prepare a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System for patient insertion at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. Keesler AFB is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. The pacing system is about the size of a vitamin and the same weight as a penny. (U.S. Air Force photo/Katie Hursey)

Medical professionals insert a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System into a patient at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, on Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a new type of heart device that provides patients with the most advanced pacing technology at one-tenth the size of a traditional pacemaker. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia.. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Medical professionals insert a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System into a patient at the Keesler Medical Center April 13, 2017, at Keesler Air Force Base, Miss. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a new type of heart device that provides patients with the most advanced pacing technology at one-tenth the size of a traditional pacemaker. Keesler AFB is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kemberly Groue)

KEESLER AIR FORCE BASE, Miss. (AFNS) -- The Keesler Medical Center became the first Air Force hospital to implant the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia April 13, 2017.

Bradycardia is a condition characterized by a slow or irregular heart rhythm, usually fewer than 60 beats per minute. At this rate, the heart is unable to pump enough oxygen-rich blood to the body during normal activity or exercise, causing dizziness, fatigue, shortness of breath or fainting spells.

“It’s similar to driving a car without an accelerator,” said Lt. Col. Matthew Hann, an 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist. “You can coast along very slowly, but when it comes time to climb a hill, you don’t have an accelerator to get the RPM’s up to climb the hill and a heart rate is the same way. If (your) heart rate is too low you don't have the energy to do activities you once enjoyed.”

Pacemakers are the most common way to treat bradycardia and restore the heart's normal rhythm by sending electrical impulses to increase heart rate. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a new type of heart device that provides patients with the most advanced pacing technology at one-tenth the size of a traditional pacemaker.

“This revolutionary technology will greatly improve patient outcomes and satisfaction,” said Col. Louis Gallo, the 81st MDOS commander.

Physicians at Keesler Air Force Base elected to use Medtronic’s Micra TPS because, unlike traditional pacemakers, the device does not require cardiac wires (leads) or a surgical “pocket” under the skin to deliver pacing therapy. Instead, the device is small enough to be delivered through a catheter and implanted directly into the heart with small tines, providing a safe alternative to conventional pacemakers without the complications associated with leads – all while being cosmetically invisible.

The Micra implant, which sits entirely in the heart, is about the size of a vitamin and the same weight as a penny, Hann said.

In addition to being undetectable and boasting a 12-year battery life, the breakthrough Micra TPS technology automatically adjusts pacing therapy based on a patient’s activity levels.

“Keesler (AFB) cardiology has always been very advanced in our practices,” Hann said. “We are very fortunate to be one of the first hospitals in the country to offer the smallest pacemaker in the world to our patients here at Keesler (AFB) and also our Veterans Affairs patients who extend all the way from the Florida panhandle through to Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.”

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @US_SOCEUR: U.S. #airmen assigned to the 352d Special Operations Wing fly a CV-22B #Osprey aircraft over #Hungary. https://t.co/sSmjq90S…
RT @HQ_AFMC: It's another #NightAtTheMuseum event at the @AFmuseum this Friday when a special evening to celebrate the final days of the Ca…
RT @HQUSAFEPA: The U.S. & #Romania have a standing partnership to address issues of regional & global security. To advance those interests,…
Our Airmen train to perform even when conditions get harsh. @435AEW defenders used self-aid & buddy care, vehicle… https://t.co/ZXVzSUBzsK
Ohio @AirNatlGuard, @178thWing and @179AW sent Disaster Relief Beddown Sets to Puerto Rico to aid earthquake relief… https://t.co/qTGlDasRdY
RT @AFResearchLab: Our 711th Human Performance Wing is studying Airmen's sleeping habits to improve performance and readiness to further th…
.@NellisAFB Airmen help prep an @AusAirForce C-17 Globemaster III to receive fire suppressant needed to aid in the… https://t.co/fRiXN5lNh0
RT @USSOCOM: SOF Truth III: Special Operations Forces cannot be mass produced. It takes years to train operational units to the level of pr…
Comptrollers from @TeamTyndall received the Gen. Larry O. Spencer Special Acts and Services Award for assisting mor… https://t.co/TIclfKmU2B
RT @F22DemoTeam: Everyone has a history. Some have a legacy. We are excited to introduce Maj. Joshua ‘Cabo’ Gunderson, commander and pilot…
A KC-135 and three F-16s from @EdwardsAFB conduct a flyover above @levisstadium during the #NFCChampionship. Fly… https://t.co/0K7GcYO1Ia
RT @AirNatlGuard: "We can always count on the training, professionalism and drive of every Airmen at the @176thWing and the Alaska Rescue C…
RT @LukeAFB: Starting the week off with a F-16 slow-mo! ✈ #slowmomonday #aviation #jets #f16 #fighterjet #usaf #sunrise https://t.co/toXXl…
RT @AETCommand: Airmen from the 29th AMU check over the first MQ-9 Reaper to be transported through ferry flight, Jan. 8, 2020, on @Holloma
RT @DeptofDefense: The cold won’t slow down the @usairforce! The Air Force is working with the @usarmyccdc to test cold weather gear and e…
RT @USAFCENT: GROUND SUPPORT | USAF Airmen assigned to the 379th AEMS worked alongside the 746th EAS to load cargo onto & launch a C-130 at…
RT @USAFHealth: #DidYouKnow, Air Force Expeditionary Medicine brings leading-edge medicine directly into battle providing injured personnel…
As he served, let us serve. Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day. https://t.co/SuE0D4UAnI
RT @AirNatlGuard: "We talk about lining ourselves up with our sister services and joint efforts to make sure we accomplish our mission; the…
RT @AFResearchLab: The year is 1947. The @usairforce officially broke the sound barrier with the Bell X-1 aircraft. This incredible feat w…