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Every journey begins with a single step – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 1)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Stephanie Proellochs relies on her wheelchair as she heads in to her daily physical therapy session at Walter Reed Medical Center, Nov. 8, 2017. Proellochs received a below-the-knee amputation in September 2017 to treat a malignant tumor that had metastasized and spread. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis)

Maj. Stephanie Proellochs relies on her wheelchair as she heads in to her daily physical therapy session at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Nov. 8, 2017. Proellochs received a below-the-knee amputation in September 2017 to treat a malignant tumor that had metastasized and spread. (DoD photo by Karina Luis)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Stephanie Proellochs and her husband, John, before heading for her last physical therapy session before she is fitted for her prosthesis at Walter Reed Medical Center, Nov. 8, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis)

Maj. Stephanie Proellochs and her husband, John, are all smiles before heading for her last physical therapy session before she is fitted for her prosthesis at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Nov. 8, 2017. (DoD photo by Karina Luis)

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AFNS) -- (This is part one of a series following an Airman through her cancer treatment and amputation)

Maj. Stephanie Proellochs, a Medical Service Corps officer, was fighting cancer, overcoming the odds and set on returning to active duty. Unfortunately, just when the finish line was in sight, new challenges presented themselves.

After a year of treatment and the amputation of her left foot, Proellochs thought she was cancer-free in November 2017. She was not. Her cancer had spread, and will require additional treatment. Her drive to overcome cancer, her commitment to rejoin her fellow Airmen and her relentlessly sunny and positive attitude are all still present and stronger than ever.

The first part of her story showcases an Airman exhibiting strength and gratitude through the highs and lows of her treatment journey.

“Every journey begins with a single step,” read the Facebook caption under a picture of Proellochs walking on a treadmill with a smile from ear-to-ear.

Most Airmen are not excited about exercising on a treadmill, but Proellochs is not your average Airman. As a recent amputee, this single step marked an important milestone on her road to recovery. Her journey has highlighted how patient-centered principles of trusted care help wounded, ill and injured Airmen at all levels of care.

For Proellochs, who has served for 10 years, it all started in late 2015 with unbearable pain in her left foot. That began a year long quest to find the root of her pain, a journey that drastically changed her life.

“I started seeing doctors, being referred to specialists and tests,” said Proellochs. “My healthcare team was determined to find answers to the cause of my pain and get me back to work.”

Her quest for answers led her to an orthopedic oncologist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in November 2016.

“The first thing he said to me was, ‘You have a tumor in your foot and the next time I talk to you, I will be taking it out,’” said Proellochs. “They removed the tumor in December 2016.”

While most would be shocked at the thought of a tumor, Proellochs had some prior experience with a benign tumor in the same foot. She assumed once doctors removed the tumor, her ordeal would be over.

However, in January 2017 she learned that her tumor was malignant and her foot needed to be amputated. Insisting on holding off on such a life-changing operation, Proellochs opted to undergo months of radiation therapy instead. By June, Proellochs thought she was healed and ready to go back to work.

Unfortunately, not long after she was back in combat boots, she noticed lumps in her upper thigh. In June, she discovered her tumor was metastatic and had spread from her foot.

“It was at that point I said, ‘Take the foot’,” said Proellochs. “When I found out it was on the move, it was time for the foot to go.”

For anyone, an amputation of a limb is a life-altering experience that nobody is prepared for. Fortunately, Proellochs’ husband and his experience working with amputees made the upcoming transition a bit easier.

“My husband, John, volunteers for a non-profit organization that is focused on working with wounded veterans who have disabilities like amputations,” says Proellochs. “He was familiar with life after amputations and conversations about what life would be like was common in our household. With the help of my husband and his experience, I felt prepared for it. And now he got his own amputee.”

Knowing life as an amputee would be different, Proellochs wanted to have one last “tour” with all 10 of her toes. This motivated her to plan a “Farewell to Foot Tour” with her family.

“I wanted to put both of my feet in the sand one more time. My family, friends and I planned a vacation to commemorate the last time I would be able to do this with my left foot. We all met up and took pictures of my 10 toes in the sand and two feet in the water for the last time.”

In September 2017, Proellochs underwent surgery to amputate her foot at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Maryland. The procedure was a below-the-knee, trans-tibia amputation on her left leg. This type of procedure will give her a strong chance at regaining a functional limb, and enable her to return to an active lifestyle.

“After speaking with my healthcare team at Walter Reed, I felt comfortable moving forward with the amputation,” said Proellochs. “The team here has such an amazing reputation, so I knew I was in good hands.”

Proellochs’ strength, positive outlook and, most of all, gratitude after amputation are impossible to ignore and help drive her recovery.

“I have the ‘paper cut’ of amputations. I only lost my left leg, so I can still drive,” explains Proellochs. “When you talk to other amputees with more severe injuries, it puts it all in perspective. I have spoken with patients who are quadruple amputees, making incredible recoveries. I look at my situation and think, ‘This is nothing. I just have a paper cut.’”

Proellochs might describe her amputation as “just a paper cut,” but facing such a life-changing event like this is a sign of her strength and her ability to stay focused on her recovery.

The next part of her story brings to light her amazing support system, the impact this has had on her Air Force career, and her ability to use humor to face the more challenging moments of her treatment.

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