HomeNewsArticle Display

Warrior Profile: Lt. Col. Audra Lyons

LtCol Audra Lyons at the 2018 Wounded Warrior Games.

Lt. Col. Audra Lyons, Wounded Warrior Games Air Force team member, competes in the Department of Defense cycling competition at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 6, 2018. Each of the Air Force’s 39 participating athletes will compete in one or more of 11 sports including archery, cycling, shooting, sitting volleyball, swimming, track and field, wheelchair basketball, indoor rowing, powerlifting and time-trial cycling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

LtCol Audra Lyons at the 2018 Wounded Warrior Games.

Lt. Col. Audra Lyons, Wounded Warrior Games Air Force team member, receives a medal from Brig. Gen. Kathleen Cook, Director of Air Force Services, during a Department of Defense Warrior Games medal ceremony at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 6, 2018. Service members and veterans competing in the Games have upper-body, lower-body, and spinal cord injuries; traumatic brain injuries; visual impairment; serious illnesses; and post-traumatic stress. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

LtCol Audra Lyons at the 2018 Wounded Warrior Games.

Lt. Col. Audra Lyons, Wounded Warrior Games Air Force team member, celebrates winning the gold medal during a Department of Defense Warrior Games medal ceremony at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 6, 2018. Each of the Air Force’s 39 participating athletes will compete in one or more of 11 sports including archery, cycling, shooting, sitting volleyball, swimming, track and field, wheelchair basketball, indoor rowing, powerlifting and time-trial cycling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

LtCol Audra Lyons at the 2018 Wounded Warrior Games.

Lt. Col. Audra Lyons, Wounded Warrior Games Air Force team member, competes in the Department of Defense Warrior Games shooting preliminary competition at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 4, 2018. There are 39 athletes representing Team Air Force at the games, competing against wounded, ill and injured service members and veterans representing the U.S. Army, Marine Corps, Navy, and Special Operations Command, as well as athletes from the U.K. Armed Forces, Australian Defence Force and Canadian Armed Forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

LtCol Audra Lyons at the 2018 Wounded Warrior Games.

Lt. Col. Audra Lyons, Wounded Warrior Games Air Force team member, hugs her husband, Frank Lyons, after a Department of Defense Warrior Games medal ceremony at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 4, 2018. Service members and veterans competing in the games have upper-body, lower-body and spinal cord injuries; traumatic brain injuries; visual impairment; serious illnesses and post-traumatic stress. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

LtCol Audra Lyons at the 2018 Wounded Warrior Games.

Lt. Col. Audra Lyons, Wounded Warrior Games Air Force team member, talks to a coach during the Department of Defense Warrior Games shooting preliminary competition at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 4, 2018. Service members and veterans competing in the games have upper-body, lower-body and spinal cord injuries; traumatic brain injuries; visual impairment; serious illnesses and post-traumatic stress. Each of the Air Force’s 39 participating athletes will compete in one or more of 11 sports including archery, cycling, shooting, sitting volleyball, swimming, track and field, wheelchair basketball, indoor rowing, powerlifting and time-trial cycling. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo., (AFNS) -- Lt. Col. Audra Lyons, Headquarters Air Force branch chief of policy integration, joined the Air Force June 26, 1997. She attended the Air Force Academy, graduated in 2001, and got married the next day.
 
“I joined the Air Force because of the educational opportunities that it could provide me,” said Lyons. “I did not think that I would stay in the Air Force longer than my five-year commitment, but after just a couple months, I loved the travel, teamwork, sense of purpose and camaraderie so much that I could not imagine leaving.”
 
Lyons joined the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program in the fall of 2017, after being diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, fibromyalgia, Morton’s neuroma and complex regional pain syndrome. Lyons said she has the same sense of family with her teammates as she has experienced as a member of the Air Force. Through her injuries she has found a way to relate with her Airmen, Lyons added.
 
“My injuries have made me better able to empathize with others going through medical challenges themselves,” said Lyons. “I’ve had troops struggle, especially with PTSD, and when I talk to them I preface the conversation with my experience, and [they seem] much more open to sharing.”
 
Airmen enrolled in the Air Force Wounded Warrior program begin their path to the Warrior Games by participating in Warrior CARE events throughout the country, then competing and qualifying at the Air Force Trials. They work with expert coaches, sports trainers and nutritionists to not only prepare for competition, but enhance their recovery.
 
This year marks Lyon’s first time competing in the Games. 
 
Why do you compete?
I compete because I, like others, had officemates killed in Iraq. I hope the way I live my life honors their sacrifice. When I was first diagnosed with the nerve disorder (CRPS) in my foot and leg, it didn’t look like I would walk ever again. Since then I’ve run in somewhere around 50 half marathons. I do all I can, because I am capable.
 
What is your motivation or drive to compete every day? And why?
I would definitely say my husband. My husband’s support has been everything to me. He has been there with me through the thick and thin. I don’t think I would be here today if it wasn’t for him. I know I would not be able to still be in the Air Force if it wasn’t for him. Because there were so many times where that I would have just called it quits and said, “I just can’t physically handle this anymore,” and then he knew I was always tougher than that mentally and physically. He was the one who was always there to encourage me.
 
What have your experiences with AFW2 been?
My experiences and interactions with AFW2 have been more real to me than any other interactions I’ve had in my entire life. I’ve been on some pretty incredible teams in my life.
 
What do you hope to get out of the Warrior Games aside from competing and winning?
The Warrior Games have given me a renewed sense of who I am, and confidence in all I am capable of; it’s reminded me of the power of sharing challenges with others. So, for me, I already entered the games successful. For me life isn’t about that end point, it’s about the journey. The medals don’t mean much to me, earning a medal is about who shows up that day. There are so many worthy people who are out there with similar injuries, that aren’t able to be here during this event. (The Games are) about respecting them, respecting all of the Airmen who have served, and reflecting on the sacrifices that have been made.

Engage

Facebook Twitter
.@20FighterWing votes for #NapoleonDynamite as they welcomed Jon and Doug Heder to the base. https://t.co/I8wZLFGE5T https://t.co/Un04Fz1tra
RT @DeptofDefense: Preparation is key. Who you prepare with is, too. @USAirForce airmen recently trained with their Filipino 🇵🇭 counterpart…
.@LukeAFB Lightning integrated technicians utilize cross functional teams to unify #maintenance specialties, increa… https://t.co/m4Vni22u4h
A new storage facility @TeamMisawa allows propulsions #Airmen the ability to rapidly provide F-16 Fighting Falcon e… https://t.co/xEnuApKS45
The nation’s most elite, #USAF #HonorGuard team, recently debuted their 2019 routine! (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemb… https://t.co/QxwpQdczUO
20 @AFSpecOpsCmd #Airmen will ruck from TX to FL in honor of Staff Sgt. Dylan J. Elchin, a #SpecialTacticshttps://t.co/bbti0C2Nlm
#Doyouevenlift? We do! @AirMobilityCmd #C17s recently delivered #hope on its way to the man-made humanitarian crisi… https://t.co/b1GicnXJ3l
.@AFWERX & @Techstars announce the 10 companies participating in #techaccelerator. See how they're working to solve… https://t.co/BCdoR4Cmmt
RT @DeptofDefense: These probably aren’t the FRIES you’re used to. @USArmy Special Forces operators practice their skills with the Fast Ro…
RT @AFEnergy: From installations, to propulsion, to maintenance, to research... engineers are critical to every part of the @usairforce mis…
.@HAFB #Airmen and the F-35 are a lethal combo during exercise Red Flag. For more about the exercise:… https://t.co/nc7F82hPI8
A B-2 Spirit bomber, deployed from @Whiteman_AFB, is staged on the flightline @JointBasePHH, Jan. 30, 2019. (… https://t.co/SVPJe2AfGH
#USAF, @USMC & @USArmy air & ground force elements train together, strengthen skills in the field and sky. #Jointhttps://t.co/Arm1IXIaDy
#DYK: @DMAFB is one of seven #AirForce bases w/forward area refueling point capabilities, and there are only 63 qua… https://t.co/UI2SzoYdjA
RT @AirMobilityCmd: Anyone out there watch Super Bowl LIII? Well, @USNorthernCmd and NORAD fighter aircraft kept the airspace safe during t…
#AirForce formalizes policy on retention of non-deployable Airmen. https://t.co/O8yfj5acRt https://t.co/7t5ynNMgo2
It's a 2-way street! Find out how our #ProfessionalDevelopment Teams are a benefit to both mentor and mentee.… https://t.co/nxmtpZWnis
.@30thSpaceWing civilians use #innovation, reutilization, and team dynamics to save #USAF $1 billion.… https://t.co/TpFKYvaxay