HomeNewsArticle Display

Special Warfare Training Wing activates to better train global combat Airmen

Members of the  Special Warfare Training Wing honor the fallen with memorial push-ups after the SWTW activation ceremony at Joint Base San Antonio-Medina Base, Texas Oct. 10, 2018. The mission of the new wing is to select, train, equip, and mentor Airmen to conduct global combat operations in contested, denied, operationally limited, and permissive environments under any environmental conditions.(U.S. Air Force photo by Andrew C. Patterson)

Members of the Special Warfare Training Wing honor the fallen with memorial push-ups after the SWTW activation ceremony at Joint Base San Antonio-Medina Base, Texas Oct. 10, 2018. The mission of the new wing is to select, train, equip, and mentor Airmen to conduct global combat operations in contested, denied, operationally limited, and permissive environments under any environmental conditions.(U.S. Air Force photo by Andrew C. Patterson)

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-LACKLAND, Texas (AFNS) -- To meet the demand for special operations warfighters and improve retention rates for these critical career fields, Air Force officials activated the Special Warfare Training Wing Oct. 10.

The mission of the new wing is to select, train, equip, and mentor Airmen to conduct global combat operations in contested, denied, operationally limited, and permissive environments under any environmental condition.

“This new wing will help us provide additional oversight and advocacy for the complex, high-risk and demanding training that's necessary to produce Airmen to meet the requirements of the joint force,” said Col. James Hughes, SWTW commander.

The new wing headquarters and subordinate organizational structure will consist of approximately 135 personnel. The existing Battlefield Airman Training Group, which was activated in June 2016, has been renamed to the Special Warfare Training Group and will report to the new wing.

Building upon what the Battlefield Airmen Training Group has started, the previously established five pillars of marketing and recruiting, manpower and leadership, curriculum, equipment and infrastructure will serve as a starting point for the wing.

“Keeping these pillars in mind will allow us to continue focusing on building the best Airman we can from the time they step into a recruiter’s office up until the end of their careers,” Hughes said.

“Wings move the ball forward at an operational and strategic level,” Hughes said. “They can provide structure, oversight, strategic vision and unity of command. But to become a leader in the special warfare community, we have to continue pushing the envelope of science and technology. It all comes down to doing everything we can to create Airmen capable of problem solving across a wide-range of national security challenges to meet the joint force’s needs.”

Additionally, the wing will focus on improving human performance by staying at the forefront of science and technology with the addition of the Human Performance Support Group. The Human Performance Support Group is a one of kind unit that will integrate specialists from a variety of sports and medical fields into special warfare training to optimize physical and mental performance, reduce injury and speed rehabilitation to create more capable and resilient ground operators.

“By pushing the limits of science and technology, we’re going to find the most efficient and effective methods for improving human performance,” Hughes said. “We’re going to take what we already have learned and enhance how we produce the most physically and psychologically fit Airmen possible for the joint force.”

Special Warfare Airmen, previously known as Battlefield Airmen, are the critical ground link between air assets and ground forces. They are trained to operate as a ground component to solve on-ground problems with air power; often embedding with conventional and special operations forces. Their requirements have grown substantially since 2001 due to the effectiveness of and increasing demand for the precision application of air power in the joint combat environment.

Seven Air Force specialty codes currently fall into the Special Warfare category: pararescue, combat rescue officer, combat control, special tactics officer, special operations weather team, tactical air control party personnel and non-rated air liaison officer. These airmen share ground combat skill sets and a sharp focus on joint, cross-domain operations.

The first step toward more efficient and effective training is to combine the courses of initial entry for all special warfare candidates into one cohesive course.

“The various Special Warfare Air Force specialty codes are a lot more similar than they are different,” said Chief Master Sgt. James Clark, SWTW command chief. “These courses of initial entry are the bedrock of lethality and readiness. By combining them, we’re making the pipeline much more efficient, while also building a team mentality that focuses on our similarities, rather than our differences.”

“This change is also the first step toward answering the most important question facing the SWTW: How do we create and develop the most adaptive and agile leaders possible?” Clark said. “It starts by continuing to be critical of ourselves, while searching for any way to become more efficient in everything that we do.”


For more information on the Special Warfare Training Wing, click here.

Engage

Facebook Twitter
Here is the latest edition of #AirForce Week in Photos! Which one is your favorite? https://t.co/5IsahN5vuK https://t.co/dqhZAC0jxN
An #Airman looks on as an F-15E Strike Eagle prepares to launch Dec. 4, 2018 @NellisAFB, Nevada. The 757th AMXS par… https://t.co/E8nmg19ou4
RT @LockheedMartin: If you like GPS, thank your @USAirForce. We're excited to have built their faster, more secure GPS III satellite - laun…
Happy #WrightBrothersDay! 115 years later and we are still continuing their legacy of #innovation. #Aviation https://t.co/DG5xmqd4rV
More than the uniform. This #Airman creates unique cosplay costumes to relax & stay ready to fight.… https://t.co/5TWDvOsIlO
#F35 Lighting IIs may move to @TeamTyndall while #Airmen deliver supplies during #OperationChristmasDrop. For more,… https://t.co/eaMq9bF5d4
For #MWD teams, trust is everything, and their bond can become unbreakable. https://t.co/qQM5U14Qec https://t.co/WtwAsOtKHz
The committed snow barn team at #JointBaseElmendorfRichardson works 24/7 snow removal ops for the installation’s st… https://t.co/AncArSlhIx
The #WorldsToughestMudder is arguably one of the most extreme, insane and imposing 24-hour obstacle course challeng… https://t.co/1AqTQL1YGD
Ever wonder how maintenance #Airmen make it possible to support hundreds of personnel and multiple aircraft? It sta… https://t.co/ivQ2E4HvZi
#Aviano's 56th Rescue Squadron partners with Italian forces for Exercise Sater -- Mountain Search and Rescue traini… https://t.co/4TUt6JvN4C
A @28thBombWing B-1B & a @914ARW KC-135 conduct aerial refueling over the U.S. on Dec. 10. The #Lancer serves as p… https://t.co/GsYRx6TheX
When you've got a dirty job, clean up can take up a lot of time. Thankfully @48FighterWing #maintenance repair & re… https://t.co/4AB3HywxZh
#DYK, @USAFCENT's weather #Airmen are not only concerned with terrestrial weather, but also space weather.… https://t.co/oqmuv3INXi
.@ArmedSvcsHockey hosted an annual Las Vegas International Championship & this year's #MVP award went to a… https://t.co/RxXoivPgco
RT @AFSpace: Recalculate no more 🙌 GPS III is launching soon! This one goes out to our 4 BILLION GPS users worldwide. #Kindofabigdeal #GPS
.@HAFB's 421st Fighter Squadron & #aircraft maintenance unit received its first pair of #F35s Dec. 12. They are the… https://t.co/MWXxz3Rr7q
#SantaClaus paid a special visit to McGhee Tyson #Airmen and their families. Santa, Mrs. Claus & their elves arrive… https://t.co/rWF4adfxts
RT @EielsonAirForce: The work of keeping one of the most remote, austere runways in the world open during six months of sub-zero temperatur…
RT @INDOPACOM: Since 1952, @PACAF personnel have volunteered as Santa’s helpers, getting presents to remote Pacific Islands. Instead of com…