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Military working dog hunts down aircrew

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Antonio Padilla, 366th Security Forces Squadron military working dog trainer, and Alf, 366th SFS military working dog, act as opposition forces and hunt down “crashed” pilots during a combat search and rescue exercise April 2, 2019 at Saylor Creek Range near Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. This is one aspect of the Gunfighter Flag exercise that tests the abilities of pilots to stay hidden until rescue arrives while military working dog trainers and their dogs hone their tracking ability in an expansive environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Andrew Kobialka)

Staff Sgt. Antonio Padilla, 366th Security Forces Squadron military working dog trainer, and Alf, 366th SFS military working dog, act as opposition forces and hunt down “crashed” pilots during a combat search and rescue exercise April 2, 2019, at Saylor Creek Range near Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. This is one aspect of the Gunfighter Flag exercise that tests the abilities of pilots to stay hidden until rescue arrives while military working dog trainers and their dogs hone their tracking ability in an expansive environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Andrew Kobialka)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Antonio Padilla, 366th Security Forces Squadron military working dog trainer, gives Alf, 366th SFS military working dog, a water break while acting as opposition forces to hunt down “crashed” pilots during a combat search and rescue exercise April 2, 2019 at Saylor Creek Range near Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. This is one aspect of the Gunfighter Flag exercise that tests the abilities of pilots to stay hidden until rescue arrives while military working dog trainers and their dogs hone their tracking ability in an expansive environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Andrew Kobialka)

Staff Sgt. Antonio Padilla, 366th Security Forces Squadron military working dog trainer, gives Alf, 366th SFS military working dog, a water break while acting as opposition forces to hunt down “crashed” pilots during a combat search and rescue exercise April 2, 2019, at Saylor Creek Range near Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. This is one aspect of the Gunfighter Flag exercise that tests the abilities of pilots to stay hidden until rescue arrives while military working dog trainers and their dogs hone their tracking ability in an expansive environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman First Class Andrew Kobialka)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho (AFNS) --

“Hide!”


Four crashed aircrew members scatter into knee-high desert brush searching for a spot to blend-in with the environment. There’s nothing but a dying, desolate landscape as far as the eye can see. And yet, they need to disappear. These aircrew are being hunted.

Rustling through the brush downwind of the pilots is a man and his dog.

“Find them!”

The duo presses on with the hunt, despite being at a disadvantage. The dog puts his nose to the air and takes in short, quick breaths, but an unrelenting mist keeps the aircrew’s scents from being carried by the wind. They traverse miles of mud and brush, stopping every-so-often to stare out into the seemingly endless tan and brown canvas laid out before them.

No matter how this ordeal ends, both sides will be better for it.

Staff Sgt. Antonio Padilla, 336th Security Forces Squadron military working dog trainer, and Alf, 366th SFS military working dog, acting as opposition forces, hunt down pilots to enhance the combat readiness of both parties during a search and rescue operation as part of a Gunfighter Flag exercise at Saylor Creek Range Complex, Idaho.

Gunfighter Flag concentrates on preparing Airmen to be ready to overcome obstacles that may appear in a deployed environment. Padilla plays a unique role in that preparation.

“When we are at the range, scouting for pilots, we are not only testing the survival skills of our pilots, but also honing the capabilities and teamwork between MWDs and their trainers,” Padilla said.

To effectively enhance readiness this training has to be exactly like the real deal.

“Finding a way to simulate stress is important,” said Staff Sgt. David H. Chorpening, 366th Operation Support Squadron noncommissioned officer in charge of survival, evasion, resistance, escape operations.

“AHHH!”

Screams riddled with anguish and anxiety filled the air as each aircrew member suffered a bite from Alf.

The aircrew was protected by a bite-suit, but the stress they experienced was almost tangible, and not easily forgotten.

Incorporating stress into these scenarios helps ingrain the survival process and procedures into the minds of Airmen to ensure they will be able to act on it in the field, Chorpening said.

Padilla and Alf bring a dose of stressful realism to the exercise through Alf’s vicious bite and undying loyalty that, consequently, often inflicts fear into whoever they pursue.

However, to be frightening is one thing, to be ready for deployment is another. That requires MWDs to be well-trained, obedient and skilled. Developing that in a MWD, like Alf, takes time and dedicated trainers.

Padilla said that there is a process of building rapport with new dogs, solidifying their commands, and exposing them to realistic situations like bite-work and detection that has to take place before they are cleared for deployment.

Ultimately, MWDs are tested in exercises like scouting for aircrew members in a vast environment with endless hiding places. This serves as a great preparation tool for MWDs and their trainers.

As an MWD and its trainer work together, they understand each other better and are able to work cohesively, Padilla said.
“On a scout, the dog leads the way, but we are a team,” Padilla said. “Alf’s senses are a lot better than a human’s. Alf will often see, hear or smell a potential target before I do. Then I am able to decipher whether or not it is what we are looking for or if we should move on.”

It is a rigorous journey to become a MWD but in the end they are able to save lives in real-world situations and through readiness exercises like Gunfighter Flag.

“This training is so beneficial for trainers and their dogs to gain the experience of realistic training,” Padilla said. “What is even better is the dualistic nature of the exercise that enables pilots to improve their survival and evasion tactics simultaneously.”

The search and rescue exercise at Saylor Creek Range Complex may be a single piece of Gunfighter Flag, but is vital nonetheless because of the life saving potential it holds. Padilla and Alf continue to diligently work towards enhancing the readiness of themselves and the aircrew they hunt.

Engage

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