HomeNewsArticle Display

Air traffic control: Keeping the skies safe

Two men stare out a window.

Airman 1st Class Tanner Bohannan, left, 19th Operations Support Squadron air traffic control apprentice, and Senior Airman Jared Asher, 19th OSS air traffic control journeyman, watch a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft take flight at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., Aug. 6, 2019. Air traffic controllers take care of maneuvering aircraft within the airspace and flight line to ensure all Airmen in the air and on the ground remain safe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristine M. Gruwell)

A plane flies at sunset.

A C-130 Hercules aircraft takes flight as the sun sets at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., Aug. 6, 2019. Air traffic controllers maneuver aircraft on the flightline and in the airspace 24-hours per day, seven days per week. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kristine M. Gruwell)

LITTLE ROCK AIR FORCE BASE, Ark. (AFNS) --

Little Rock Air Force Base sends out aircraft every day, supporting a variety of missions around the local area and across the globe. The 19th Operations Support Squadron air traffic controllers take care of maneuvering aircraft within Little Rock AFB airspace and the flightline to ensure all Airmen in the air and on the ground remain safe.

“Essentially we’re putting a puzzle together,” said Senior Airman Jared Asher, 19th OSS air traffic control journeyman. “With our ground traffic and the planes flying back to base, we have to work a puzzle. If the pilots listen and everything flows the way it’s supposed to, the puzzle comes together. There are times when there is generalized chaos and it causes the puzzle to get jumbled, but it’s our job to put it back together.”

Similar to other careers, on-the-job training for air traffic controllers is a must in order to ensure agile combat airlift is delivered anywhere and anytime. Airmen assigned to this unit learn alongside a fully qualified and experienced trainer, so there is no room for error when it comes to mission success.

“We monitor the newer Airmen closely, but when they’ve received certifications for the numerous positions, we let them work as though they are fully trained,” Asher said. “We sit back and watch unless we need to step in.”

While the trainees are learning, they move throughout three different positions: clearance and delivery, ground control and local. Each position has one goal in mind – ensuring aircraft stay a safe distance apart, whether they’re on the ground or in the air.

“I didn’t understand the importance of the job in technical school,” said Airman 1st Class Tanner Bohannan, 19th OSS air traffic control apprentice. “It was rewarding becoming operational and understanding our role within (Little Rock AFB): to bring aircrew home safely when they return from a mission.”

Luckily, the installation’s routine operational and training missions utilizes the same airframe – the C-130 Hercules. This means air-traffic rules and regulations do not differ much when guiding aircraft on Little Rock AFB.

“The mission aspect makes air traffic a lot easier because we only have one airframe, with similar missions,” Asher said. “Air traffic is an interesting job because every base does the same job and follows the same procedures, but it differs when it comes to the size of the airspace and type of aircraft being used.”

Combat airlift is a 24-hours per day, seven days per week mission. Air traffic controllers must stay ready to lead air traffic at all times. The high risk of guiding aircraft on a base comes with high reward.

“I wouldn’t trade any job for this one,” Asher said. “Receiving a short-notice call about a humanitarian mission and seeing the C-130 come back knowing our mission helped save people’s lives is why it’s all worth it.”

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @AFResearchLab: Our 711th Human Performance Wing is studying Airmen's sleeping habits to improve performance and readiness to further th…
.@NellisAFB Airmen help prep an @AusAirForce C-17 Globemaster III to receive fire suppressant needed to aid in the… https://t.co/fRiXN5lNh0
RT @USSOCOM: SOF Truth III: Special Operations Forces cannot be mass produced. It takes years to train operational units to the level of pr…
Comptrollers from @TeamTyndall received the Gen. Larry O. Spencer Special Acts and Services Award for assisting mor… https://t.co/TIclfKmU2B
RT @F22DemoTeam: Everyone has a history. Some have a legacy. We are excited to introduce Maj. Joshua ‘Cabo’ Gunderson, commander and pilot…
A KC-135 and three F-16s from @EdwardsAFB conduct a flyover above @levisstadium during the #NFCChampionship. Fly… https://t.co/0K7GcYO1Ia
RT @AirNatlGuard: "We can always count on the training, professionalism and drive of every Airmen at the @176thWing and the Alaska Rescue C…
RT @LukeAFB: Starting the week off with a F-16 slow-mo! ✈ #slowmomonday #aviation #jets #f16 #fighterjet #usaf #sunrise https://t.co/toXXl…
RT @AETCommand: Airmen from the 29th AMU check over the first MQ-9 Reaper to be transported through ferry flight, Jan. 8, 2020, on @Holloma
RT @DeptofDefense: The cold won’t slow down the @usairforce! The Air Force is working with the @usarmyccdc to test cold weather gear and e…
RT @USAFCENT: GROUND SUPPORT | USAF Airmen assigned to the 379th AEMS worked alongside the 746th EAS to load cargo onto & launch a C-130 at…
RT @USAFHealth: #DidYouKnow, Air Force Expeditionary Medicine brings leading-edge medicine directly into battle providing injured personnel…
As he served, let us serve. Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day. https://t.co/SuE0D4UAnI
RT @AirNatlGuard: "We talk about lining ourselves up with our sister services and joint efforts to make sure we accomplish our mission; the…
RT @AFResearchLab: The year is 1947. The @usairforce officially broke the sound barrier with the Bell X-1 aircraft. This incredible feat w…
RT @theF35JPO: Congratulations to the @AusAirForce for completing their #F35 training mission at @LukeAFB! 🇦🇺 ⚡ Learn more 🔗 https://t.co/2…
RT @CENTCOM: A French Rafale conducts nighttime air refueling with a U.S. Air Force KC-10 Extender assigned to the 380th Air Expeditionary…
RT @DeptofDefense: Jumping from a plane becomes a big step toward friendship. 301 soldiers and airmen from @USArmyReserve, @usairforce, and…
Explosive Disposal Ordnance (EOD) Airmen are often assigned to some of the most dangerous missions and perform tact… https://t.co/xYc9Ip5psn
Start this year by supporting your #Airmen in their pursuit of #resiliency. Learn about common triggers of invisibl… https://t.co/6gJSfJKvcK