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Aspiring Air Force pilots: Don’t let height standards get in the way

U.S. Air Force Maj. Nick Harris (left) and Capt. Jessica Wallander, instructor pilots with the 71st Flying Training Wing at Vance Air Force Base, Okla., stand side-by-side to illustrate the varying standing heights of Air Force pilots to dispel the myth that there is one height standard for all Air Force pilots.  Height waivers are available for candidates that do not meet AFI 48-123 standards.  If you are interested in learning more about height waivers, work with your commission source or contact the Air Force Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF. (U.S. Air Force Courtesy Photo)

U.S. Air Force Maj. Nick Harris (left) and Capt. Jessica Wallander, instructor pilots with the 71st Flying Training Wing at Vance Air Force Base, Okla., stand side-by-side to illustrate the varying standing heights of Air Force pilots to dispel the myth that there is one height standard for all Air Force pilots. Height waivers are available for candidates that do not meet Air Force Instruction 48-123 standards. If you are interested in learning more about height waivers, work with your commission source or contact the Air Force Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF. (U.S. Air Force Courtesy Photo)

Maj. Gen. Craig Wills, 19th Air Force commander, stands side-by-side with a 19th Air Force pilot to illustrate the varying standing heights of Air Force pilots to dispel the myth that there is one height standard for all Air Force pilots.  Height waivers are available for candidates that do not meet AFI 48-123 standards. If you are interested in learning more about height waivers, work with your commission source or contact the Air Force Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

Maj. Gen. Craig Wills, Nineteenth Air Force commander, stands side-by-side with a Nineteenth Air Force pilot to illustrate the varying standing heights of Air Force pilots to dispel the myth that there is one height standard for all Air Force pilots. Height waivers are available for candidates that do not meet Air Force Instruction 48-123 standards. If you are interested in learning more about height waivers, work with your commission source or contact the Air Force Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

Two instructor pilots from the 14th Flying Training Wing at Columbus Air Force Base, Miss., stand side-by-side to illustrate the varying standing heights of Air Force pilots to dispel the myth that there is one height standard for all Air Force pilots.  Height waivers are available for candidates that do not meet AFI 48-123 standards. If you are interested in learning more about height waivers, work with your commission source or contact the Air Force Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

Two instructor pilots from the 14th Flying Training Wing at Columbus Air Force Base, Miss., stand side-by-side to illustrate the varying standing heights of Air Force pilots to dispel the myth that there is one height standard for all Air Force pilots. Height waivers are available for candidates that do not meet Air Force Instruction 48-123 standards. If you are interested in learning more about height waivers, work with your commission source or contact the Air Force Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas (AFNS) --

Those who aspire to one day become a U.S. Air Force aviator must first meet several requirements, including height, before they are considered for pilot training. For those who fall outside of the Air Force’s height requirements, height waivers are available.

“Don’t automatically assume you don’t qualify because of your height,” said Maj. Gen. Craig Wills, 19th Air Force commander. “We have an incredibly thorough process for determining whether you can safely operate our assigned aircraft. Don’t let a number on a website stop you from pursuing a career with the best Air Force in the world.”

The current height requirement to become an Air Force pilot is a standing height of 5 feet, 4 inches to 6 feet, 5 inches and a sitting height of 34-40 inches. These standard height requirements have been used for years to ensure candidates will safely fit into an operational aircraft and each of the prerequisite training aircraft. “We’re rewriting these rules to better capture the fact that no two people are the exact same, even if they are the same overall height,” Wills said.

“Height restrictions are an operational limitation, not a medical one, but the majority of our aircraft can accommodate pilots from across the height spectrum,” Wills said. “The bottom line is that the vast majority of the folks who are below 5 feet, 4 inches and have applied for a waiver in the past five years have been approved.”

The waiver process begins at each of the commissioning sources for pilot candidates, whether the U.S. Air Force Academy, Officer Training School or Reserve Officer Training Corps. For those who do not meet the standard height requirements, anthropometric measurements are completed at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, or at the U.S. Air Force Academy.

“We have a great process in place to evaluate and accommodate those who fall outside our published standards,” Wills said. “If an applicant is over 5 feet, 2 inches tall, historically they have a greater than 95% chance of qualifying for service as a pilot. Applicants as short as 4 feet, 11 inches have received waivers in the past five years.”

Anthropometric measurements include sitting eye height, buttocks to knee length and arm span. The anthropometric device at Wright Patterson AFB is the only device accepted by the Air Force when determining waiver eligibility. A specialty team conducts the measurements at U.S. Air Force Academy.

Waiver packages are then coordinated through a partnership between the Air Education Training Command surgeon general and Nineteenth Air Force officials, who are responsible for all of the Air Force’s initial flying training.

“As part of the waiver process, we have a team of experts who objectively determine if a candidate’s measurements are acceptable,” said Col. Gianna Zeh, AETC surgeon general. “Let us make the determination if your measures are truly an eliminating issue.”

The pilot waiver system is in place to determine whether pilot applicants of all sizes can safely operate assigned aircraft and applicants who are significantly taller or shorter than average may require special screening.

“Some people may still not qualify,” Wills said. “But, the Air Force is doing everything that we can to make a career in aviation an option for as many people as possible. The waiver process is another example of how we can expand the pool of eligible pilot candidates.”

If you are interested in learning more about height waivers, work with your commission source or contact the Air Force Call Center at 1-800-423-USAF.

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