HomeNewsArticle Display

Air Force looks to cost-effective technologies to sustain future operations

Dr. David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, prepares his notes prior to testifying on science and technology programs in the changing security environment before the House Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threat and Capabilities, in Washington D.C., March 26, 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Carlin Leslie)

Dr. David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, prepares his notes prior to testifying on science and technology programs in the changing security environment before the House Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threat and Capabilities, in Washington D.C., March 26, 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Carlin Leslie)

Dr. David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering reviews panel members with Dr. Arati Prabhakar Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency director, prior to testifying  on science and technology programs in the changing security environment before the House Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threat and Capabilities , in Washington D.C., March 26, 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Carlin Leslie)

Dr. David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering reviews panel members with Dr. Arati Prabhakar Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency director, prior to testifying on science and technology programs in the changing security environment before the House Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threat and Capabilities , in Washington D.C., March 26, 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Carlin Leslie)

Dr. David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, testifies on science and technology programs in the changing security environment before the House Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threat and Capabilities, in Washington D.C., March 26, 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Carlin Leslie)

Dr. David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, testifies on science and technology programs in the changing security environment before the House Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threat and Capabilities, in Washington D.C., March 26, 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Carlin Leslie)

WASHINGTON (AFNS) --

Focused and balanced investments in science and technology programs across the services were at the center of discussions during a hearing before the House Armed Services Committee’s subcommittee on Intelligence, Emerging Threat and Capabilities on Capitol Hill, March 26.

Dr. David Walker, Air Force deputy assistant secretary of science, technology and engineering, stressed the importance of maintaining technological superiority, while also ensuring the proper management of funding for new and more cost-effective programs.

“Globalization and the proliferation of technology mean we face threats across a wide spectrum and competition across all domains,” he said. “The focused and balanced investments of the Air Force Fiscal Year 2015 [Science and Technology] program are hedges against the unpredictable future and provide pathways to a flexible, precise and lethal force at a relatively low cost in relation to the return on investment.”

Technological advancement and sustainment efforts were highlighted by Alan Shaffer, assistant secretary of defense principle deputy for defense research and engineering. He noted some of the ways the DOD is creating technology surprise through innovative technologies and engineering.

“The department invests in a structured way to create surprise,” Shaffer said. “Creation of surprise requires a robust basic research program coupled with a strong applied research. While it is not really possible to know where technology surprise will come from, there are several areas that highlight the possibility.”

Walker emphasized the need for learning from the past, as well as focusing on the future, while addressing the highest priority needs of the Air Force across the near-, mid- and far-term. By building and growing game-changing and enabling technologies, he is confident the Air Force’s science and technology (S&T) strategy is poised to ensure technological superiority across air, space and cyberspace.

“This flexible strategy provides us the technological agility to adapt our S&T (space and technology) program to dynamic strategic, budgetary and technology environments, and will shape prioritized actionable S&T plans,” he said.

Regardless of budget constraints, the commitment to supporting the warfighter and protecting this nation from any threat are top priorities, Walker said.

“We recognize that fiscal challenges will not disappear tomorrow, and that is why we have continued to improve our processes to make better investment decisions and efficiently deliver capability to our warfighters.”

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @GenDaveGoldfein: Commander @PACAF Gen Brown & I just arrived in #Vietnam. What an honor to be here. We look forward to meeting Amb Krit…
RT @HQ_AFMC: Congrats to @HAFB for winning a @ENERGY award for #energy efficiency! From facility improvements to solar arrays, the teams at…
RT @AF_TFXC: Training camp is underway for Air Force Cross Country. Tonight, the upperclassman received their #CommitmentKits, symbolic of…
RT @USAFHealth: Lt. Col. Glenn Mandeville's commitment to his community goes beyond his Air Force service and into his everyday life as a g…
RT @AFResearchLab: No, you're not looking through The Predator's helmet, this is a simulated residual stress field due to multi-shot laser…
RT @CoachTimHorton: Congrats to my mentor and former ⁦@AF_Football⁩ Coach ⁦@FisherDeBerry⁩ on being named the recipient of the 6th annual T…
RT @DeptofDefense: Friday reflection. @usairforce airmen prepare to wash an A-10 Thunderbolt II at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. The…
RT @OKGuard: Photo of the Day: Four F-16 Vipers from the @138thFW fly in formation behind a @usairforce KC-135 Stratotanker during a sortie…
RT @EielsonAirForce: The last #REDFLAGAlaska of the year ends today! Here’s what the participants accomplished during RF-A 19-3. @RCAF_ARC
RT @DeptofDefense: Picture perfect. A @usairforce airman assigned to a forward area refueling point program, poses in front of a C-17 Glob…
RT @DOD_Outreach: The @AF_Academy Wings of Blue parajumpers jump out of a C-130 Hercules during a performance for more than 70,000 visitors…
RT @PACAF: .@usairforce medical personnel led a mass casualty exercise to give realistic training scenarios in support of Pac Angel 19-3 #M
RT @Travis60AMW: Beats the garage I have at my place ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Check out this C-17's home when it's not out delivering cargo! #NoBounds #Pr
RT @ArmedwScience: Do you know B.A.T.M.A.N.? Battlefield Air Targeting Man-Aided Knowledge is the @AFResearchLab's advanced technology de…
RT @AETCommand: How are you staying active today? Last Saturday, Airmen from @HollomanAFB, @CannonAFB_ & @KIRTLAND377ABW competed in the "B…
RT @AETCommand: In order to support #readiness & build a more #lethal force, leaders must foster & promote resilience among their Airmen. D…
RT @GenDaveGoldfein: Commanding General of the Philippine Air Force, Lt Gen Briguez said it best, our relationship is etched in stone — iro…
RT @HQAirUniversity: What is @usairforce culture? AU's Command Chief Simmons talks about organizational culture and how the actions modele…
RT @thejointstaff: #DYK today marks the 70th anniversary of the Chairmanship? Watch recently discovered footage from the historic swearing…
This week really flew by fast. Be sure to #Follow, #Like & #RT our @AFThunderbirds for more info on the premiere a… https://t.co/5BM8N7sZTR