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Becoming a boom

U.S. Air Force Airmen 1st Class Shelby Bowling, 340th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, refuels a U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier II over Iraq in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Dec. 31, 2015.  The 340th EARS reached a significant milestone for 2015 by flying more than 100,000 combat hours before the new year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

U.S. Air Force Airmen 1st Class Shelby Bowling, 340th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, refuels a U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier II over Iraq in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Dec. 31, 2015. The 340th EARS reached a significant milestone for 2015 by flying more than 100,000 combat hours before the new year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

A U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier II refuels over Iraq in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Dec. 31, 2015. OIR is the coalition intervention against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

A U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harrier II refuels over Iraq in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Dec. 31, 2015. OIR is the coalition intervention against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

U.S. Air Force Airmen 1st Class Shelby Bowling, 340th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, performs pre-flight checklists at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Dec. 31, 2015. The 340th EARS reached a significant milestone for 2015 by flying more than 100,000 combat hours before the new year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

U.S. Air Force Airmen 1st Class Shelby Bowling, 340th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, performs pre-flight checklists at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Dec. 31, 2015. The 340th EARS reached a significant milestone for 2015 by flying more than 100,000 combat hours before the new year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nathan Lipscomb)

MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan. (AFNS) -- (This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series. These stories focus on individual Airmen, highlighting their Air Force story.)

From an early age, Airman 1st Class Shelby Bowling, a 350th Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, had an idea of what she wanted to do when she grew up.

"My dad is former Air Force, and I always wanted to be in the military at some point," Bowling said.

It wasn't until midway through her time in college that life provided her an opportunity to take a chance.

"I was about halfway done with (my degree) and the school I was attending raised its tuition," said the Fairbanks, Alaska native. "I couldn't put myself into debt, so I took a couple months off."

During her time off, Bowling revisited her childhood dream of joining the military and decided that it was either now or never. Her dad encouraged her to look into flying jobs as either a boom operator or a loadmaster. 

"I knew what I wanted to do immediately," Bowling said. "I told the recruiter that I wanted to be a boom, and I got the job three weeks later."

After basic military training, Bowling stayed at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, where she began her yearlong journey to become a boom operator in a flight fundamentals course. It was during this time she also found out she would be assigned to the KC-135 Stratotanker.

Bowling received KC-135 specific training on the ins and outs of the aircraft down to the hydraulic and electric systems during the next several months after her flight fundamentals course.

While she wasn't studying in the classroom, Bowling said she was busy in the simulator getting the hang of all the controls and learning how to refuel various aircraft in different conditions. 

After spending numerous hours practicing in the simulator, her instructors felt she was ready to try out her new in-flight refueling skills with real aircraft.

"It's mind-blowing, everything was going super fast," she said. "Now it's easy, and it's like second nature, but that first ride you're just blown away at everything that you have to do. I just remember being overwhelmed."

Since then, this boom operator said she has come to love the entire aspect of aerial refueling and the adrenaline rush that comes with it. The excitement and motivation to do her job well has carried her through multiple deployments and TDYs in support of various contingencies around the world.

"It's the mobility," she said. "(Some aircraft) can't make it even half way across the country without us. You get to drag planes all across the world. Expanding our reach, I think is the most important."

Her work ethic both in the office and on the aircraft doesn't go unnoticed.

"Bowling is a highly motivated, good attitude, hard-working boom operator and Airman," said Senior Airman Josh Garrett, a 350th ARS boom operator. "The Air Force needs more Airmen like her."

Although her hard work may not always get her in the spotlight, Bowling said this might actually be the coolest aspect of her job.

"When people ask me what I do and I tell them that I refuel planes in the air, (a lot) of people don't know that exists," Bowling said. "I think that's the coolest part, doing a job that isn't really known or commonly talked about. It's exciting. There's no other job that I would want to do in the military."

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