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U.S. Air Force News

  • 25th SecAF portrait unveiled during ceremony at Pentagon

    The official portrait of former Secretary of the Air Force Barbara M. Barrett, who also previously served as the U.S. ambassador to Finland, was unveiled in the Pentagon Auditorium, May 13, during a tribute to the stateswomen who led the Department of the Air Force from 2019 to 2021.

  • AMC’s longest flight: 24.2 hours in a KC-46A

    The KC-46 is Air Mobility Command’s newest aerial refueling platform, and now after completing the 24-hour flight, holds AMC’s record for the longest duration flight in its history.

  • ‘Candy Bomber’ passes away at 101

    Starting his career in the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1942, Halvorsen served as a pilot until his retirement in 1974, after accumulating more than 8,000 flying hours and 31 years of military service. He was also known as the "Candy Bomber."

  • AETC 80th Anniversary Gala scheduled for Jan. 22

    The Air Education and Training Command’s 80th Anniversary Gala event will feature a prominent Air Force leader as the keynote speaker, and a live performance by Velocity of the U.S. Air Force Band of the West.

  • Multi-state ceremony to celebrate first human flight

    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base will honor the local foundation of innovation and grit its mission is built upon Dec. 17 at 10 a.m., commemorating the Wright brothers’ accomplishments 118 years ago with the annual First Flight ceremony.

  • Tuskegee Airman celebrates 102nd birthday at 12th FTW

    Tuskegee Airman, retired Brig. Gen. Charles E. McGee, and several members of his family, visited JBSA Dec. 6 and were treated to a heritage tour of the 99th Flying Training Squadron, where they also saw a T-1A Jayhawk on the nearby flightline with his name painted on the side.

  • Civil Air Patrol celebrates 80th anniversary

    Civil Air Patrol members throughout the United States and in overseas squadrons are celebrating the organization’s commitment to community service today — a commitment that began Dec. 1, 1941, and has continued for 80 years.

  • Women Airforce Service Pilots and their fight for veteran status

    As we celebrate Veterans Day, let’s take a moment to remember the remarkable history of the Women’s Airforce Service Pilots as their story reminds us how imperative it is to remember the debts we owe to previous generations who safeguarded our democracy.

  • P-47 pilot honored on POW/MIA recognition day

    Southward from Advanced Landing Ground A-6 near Sainte-Mère-Église, Normandy, France, the P-47 Thunderbolt fighters pilots flew. Two months after D-Day, they were on a summer evening armed reconnaissance mission which took them to the St. Nazaire area, still occupied by Nazi forces. But before they

  • Brown named honorary Tuskegee Airman, receives symbolic red jacket

    Induction into the elite group of Tuskegee Airmen Inc. as an honorary member is a direct reflection of an individual’s dedication to preserving the heritage and legacy of the “Red Tails” as well as introducing youth to aviation and science, technology, engineering and math opportunities.

  • 25 Years Later: Remembering Khobar Towers

    “I still don’t know if the bloody footprints on the ground are those of a survivor or one of the 19 who lost their lives that day.”Those are the words of Master Sgt. Norma Gillette, U.S. Air Forces Europe - Air Forces Africa Innovation and Transformation Office superintendent and survivor of the

  • 3rd AF leadership reflects on 80th birthday, focuses on future

    The Third Air Force’s long history predates World War II. It was activated as the Southeast Air District of the United States Army Air Corps in December 1940. About three months later in early 1941, the Southeast Air District was redesignated Third Air Force with a mission for the defense of the

  • US, Japan conduct historic airborne operation

    The 374th Airlift Wing supported the JGSDF, 1st Airborne Brigade, for the largest static-line personnel jump and cargo drop between the U.S. and Japan, for exercise Airborne 21, March 9 to 11.

  • Renowned test pilot Chuck Yeager dies

    Probably his most notable achievement was piloting the Bell X-1 experimental rocket plane, in which he became the first human to fly faster than the speed of sound in 1947, shortly after the founding of the U.S. Air Force as a separate service.

  • A message for the Air Force JAG Corps

    Like many of you, I have faced a gamut of emotions especially in light of the current discussions and events in our country (and our Air Force) revolving around race and justice. Perhaps unlike many of you, these emotions are familiar to me. I am a Black woman. I have faced my fair share of bias and

  • Van Ovost nominated to be next AMC commander

    Gen. Maryanne Miller, Air Mobility Command commander, and Lt. Gen. Jacqueline Van Ovost, AMC deputy commander, marked the first time in history that an Air Force major command has been led by both a female commander and deputy. If confirmed, Van Ovost will pin on her fourth star, assume command of

  • 78th anniversary of the Doolittle Raid

    April 18 marks the 78th anniversary of the Doolittle Raid, in which Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle, U.S. Army Air Forces, and Vice Adm. William F. Halsey Jr., U.S. Navy, led a joint bombing operation on the Japanese mainland aimed to inflict both material and psychological damage upon the enemy

  • “I Have a Dream” still inspiring

    Dr. King Jr. was a Baptist minister, turned social activist and civil rights leader who called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism.

  • Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation honors Berlin Airlift veterans

    The Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation celebrated the 70th anniversary of the end of Berlin Airlift at their annual “Spirit of the Battle of Britain” banquet last month to honor these veterans for their contributions to the alliance between the United States and the United Kingdom.

  • Chance encounter at A/TA reveals impact of Berlin ‘candy bomber’

    As a special guest speaker and attendee at the 51st annual Airlift/Tanker Association Conference in Orlando, Florida, Oct. 23-26, Air Force 1st Lt. Gail Halvorsen shared his personal memories flying many of the Berlin Airlift’s 278,000 flights into the blockaded city between June 1948 and September

  • Honoring a legend

    Retired Lt. Col. Richard “Dick” Cole, the last surviving member of the Doolittle Raid and an original Air Commando, passed away at the age of 103, April 9.

  • Enlisted Heritage and Training Complex uses the past to teach the present

    Located mainly on Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, the Enlisted Heritage and Training Complex uses heritage to train, educate, inspire and recruit Airmen to fly, fight and win the nation’s wars through an extensive array of artifacts and exhibits spanning more than 111 years of aeronautic history.

  • Memphis Belle opens at National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

    Seventy five years ago on May 17, 1943, the crew of the B-17F Memphis Belle completed their 25th combat mission in Nazi-occupied Europe. They overcame insurmountable odds by becoming the first U.S. Army Air Forces heavy bomber to complete 25 missions and return to the U.S. Exactly 75 years after

  • Fairfield to the front lines: Honoring Air Force heritage

    The aircraft was a C-5M Super Galaxy assigned to the 22nd Airlift Squadron, and its 11-person crew was all African-American. This historic mission was created to honor the heritage of the Tuskegee Airmen and to showcase the capability of Travis AFB to deliver cargo from the U.S. to the front lines

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: Operation Santa

    FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, Md. (AFNS) – What started as a simple typo, turned into yearly tradition where every year the North American Aerospace Defense Command helps children all over the world track Santa. Track Santa this year at www.noradsanta.org.Yesterday's Air Force is a history and heritage

  • Search for our fallen continues

    Drenched in sweat from the hot, humid Vietnam weather, our shovels breached the earth’s surface excavating the ground and placing it into buckets to be screened as we searched for one of our own.

  • Tuskegee Airman trail blazes through history

    In the early 20th century the military was a different experience for some.Among those members was U.S. Air Force retired Chief Master Sgt. James Cotten, a Tuskegee Airman, who was drafted at the age of 18 in 1945.

  • F-35 makes historic appearance at Paris Air Show

    The U.S. made history when two F-35A Lightning IIs arrived at the Paris Air Show to fly the aircraft's first public aerial demonstrations June 19 – 25, 2017. Pulling off a historic event such as this takes months of careful planning and preparation. This team had only 36 days to make it happen.

  • MQ-1 squadron celebrates 100 years

    The 15th Attack Squadron patch depicting a pigeon clutching a telescope harkens to the squadron’s long history of reconnaissance missions. On May 9, 2017, the 15th ATKS celebrated their 100-year anniversary and reflected on the unit’s extensive and honorable heritage, which coincidentally includes

  • First combat MQ-1, MQ-9 wing celebrates 10 years at Creech AFB

    The 432nd Wing celebrated their 10th anniversary at Creech Air Force Base as a combat remotely piloted aircraft wing May 1, 2017. In attendance was Gen. Mike Holmes, the Air Combat Command commander, Col. Case Cunningham, the 432nd WG/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing commander, and 400 Airmen of the

  • Wright-Patterson, NMUSAF pay tribute to Doolittle Raid 75th anniversary

    Friends, family and fans from around the country came together to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid April 17-18, 2017, at the National Museum of the United States Air Force located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The April 18, 1942, Doolittle Raid on Tokyo was an

  • Rechristening honors Doolittle Raiders’ 75th anniversary

    The 75th anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders was commemorated April 17, 2017, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base as a B-1 Lancer bomber from Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, was rechristened the “Ruptured Duck”. New nose art was also unveiled on the B-1 in tribute to a B-25 Mitchell bomber flown

  • Deployment provides reservist teacher valuable experience for classroom

    Master Sgt. Jason Paseur, currently deployed in Southwest Asia as the 386th Air Expeditionary Wing historian, is always on the hunt for creative lessons for the classroom where he teaches as a civilian. Paseur is a reservist deployed from the 94th Airlift Wing out of Dobbins Air Reserve Base,

  • Scott AFB celebrates century of service

    Located in the heartland of America, Scott Air Force Base marked the historic milestone with a kickoff celebration Jan. 7 that helped launch a yearlong effort to honor its heritage, thank its mission and community partners and posture the installation for the next 100 years.

  • Archaeologists discover proof of wetlands, ancient life on Utah range

    A team of archaeologists recently working on the Utah Test and Training Range under the direction of the Hill Air Force Base Cultural Resource Program discovered a 12,300-year-old hearth -- an archaeological "feature" -- and artifacts, which tell the story of North America's earliest inhabitants and

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: Apollo 15

    Manned by an all-Air Force crew, the Apollo 15 mission was considered a great success. It was the fourth time man had landed on the moon.

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: AF museum opens new building

    The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, is showing off its brand new hangar full of historical aircraft and tons of Air Force history. It features four sections: presidential, research and development, space, and global reach.

  • Documenting a tragedy: Global Strike historian recalls Khobar Towers

    Yancy Mailes, the Air Force Global Strike Command historian, was a 27-year-old staff sergeant at the time. It was June 25, 1996, and he had been the wing’s historian for three months. With little training and less experience, he found himself as one of the key contributors to documenting the tragedy

  • Hanscom historian captures share of Air Force-level award

    Hanscom Air Force Base historian Randy Bergeron has earned a share of the Dennis F. Casey Award for Excellence in Periodic History in the Albert S. Simpson Category for co-authoring the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center's periodic history last year.

  • Yesterday's Air Force: Daniel "Chappie" James Jr.

    Daniel “Chappie” James Jr. was the Air Force’s first African-American four-star general. He trained Tuskegee Airmen and even faced former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi at Wheelus Air Force Base, Libya.

  • Desert Storm: 2nd Bomb Wing leads the air war

    In the early morning of Jan. 16, 1991, the 2nd Bomb Wing deployed seven B-52G Stratofortresses and crews to Iraq in a single, secret mission that would mark the beginning of Operation Desert Storm.

  • AFSOC historian retires after 50-plus years of service

    The longest-serving historian in the Air Force retired at Hurlburt Field Jan. 7. Herb Mason, the Air Force Special Operations Command historian, spent more than 50 years preserving the Air Force story for generations to come.

  • Veterans in Blue: honoring those who served

    The Air Force maintains a special portrait display in the Pentagon as part of its commitment to honoring the devotion and service of veterans. Volume VI will replace volume V of the Veterans in Blue project this November.

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: The B-36

    After World War II the threat of nuclear weapons was felt by every man, woman and child in the country. America knew it needed a platform to help deter a nuclear strike, and the solution was the B-36 Peacemaker.

  • Tuskegee Airman takes final flight at Academy

    Franklin Macon joined the Army Air Corps in 1943 after the creation of the Tuskegee program allowed African-Americans to fill military pilot positions, which were previously occupied exclusively by whites. On Aug. 26 at the age of 92, Macon sat on the airfield at the U.S. Air Force Academy, waiting

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: The Enola Gay

    The thought of using a nuclear weapon is a heavy one, and when the first nuclear bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, it sparked conversations all over the world. What does it mean to have nuclear power? How should it be used? All this started with one aircraft: the Enola Gay.

  • Doolittle Raiders share Congressional Gold Medal with the world

    On April 18, 1942, 80 men inspired a nation by flying 16 B-25 bombers off the deck of the USS Hornet and dropping ordnance on Tokyo. Now, 73 years later, Congress honored these men with the Congressional Gold Medal, presented to the Raiders in Washington D.C., April 15.

  • Challenge coins: A tradition of excellence

    Throughout the time we spend in the military, we collect many things. Whether they are mementos, awards or habits, such items are kept to remember those special moments we never wish to forget. Challenge coins are an example of these memories, as they are a form of recognition of the hard work and

  • Blake paved way for thousands of Air Force women

    At the first available opportunity to return to her roots, Staff Sgt. Esther Blake transferred from the Army to the Air Force on July 8, 1948, minutes after the start of the first duty day for the WAF, along with 11 other women at Fort McPherson, near Atlanta. She remained on active duty with the

  • Native American legacy of honor, dedication

    During November, the nation pays homage to the contributions of Native Americans throughout history. On Aug. 3, 1990, President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution designating November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage

  • Look past 1947 for Air Force roots

    Maybe it's a genetic thing I share with them, but I agree that Air Force history predates Sept. 18, 1947, and think we should do a better job of recognizing that. The problem is, of course, what to use as a starting date for such remembrances?

  • Air Force uses lasers to preserve space history

    Cape Canaveral's Launch Complex 14 is best known as the launch site for NASA's "Friendship 7," the flight that brought John Glenn fame as the first American to orbit the Earth in 1962. Now, more than 50 years later, the complex and other National Historic Landmarks are rapidly falling into decay.

  • C-130 celebrates 60 years, still going strong

    In 1954, the song "Rock Around the Clock" was playing on the radio, Oprah Winfrey was born and the first issue of Sports Illustrated appeared on newsstands. The same year, on August 23, the YC-130 Hercules made its maiden flight...

  • Veterans in Blue Volume IV out now

    For decades, Airmen have answered the call to serve and protect the nation’s interests, people and cherished freedoms that underpin it all, risking their lives for others, and thus, becoming heroes in the eyes of those they protected.

  • Technology helps remember fallen, ensures memories live on

    It was a damp, foggy morning in October, amidst a sea of marble headstones; the sound of bells chiming out seemed to echo the air of somberness all around at Madingley American Cemetery, near Cambridge. The whole scene was humbling.