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U.S. Air Force News

  • 25 Years Later: Remembering Khobar Towers

    “I still don’t know if the bloody footprints on the ground are those of a survivor or one of the 19 who lost their lives that day.”Those are the words of Master Sgt. Norma Gillette, U.S. Air Forces Europe - Air Forces Africa Innovation and Transformation Office superintendent and survivor of the

  • Living with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; a veteran's story (Part 1)

    Post-traumatic stress disorder carries him into the depths of fear and pain; reliving images of death and destruction. Closing his eyes to night terrors at sundown and fighting through daily anxiety attacks eventually pushed him to the brink of suicide so he could put an end to the never-ending

  • Around the Air Force: June 27

    In this look around the Air Force, the Osan Air Base, Japan, community remembers a hero; the Air Force secretary talks about space as a potential battlefield; and survivors of the Khobar Towers bombing recall the 1996 terrorist attack.

  • Documenting a tragedy: Global Strike historian recalls Khobar Towers

    Yancy Mailes, the Air Force Global Strike Command historian, was a 27-year-old staff sergeant at the time. It was June 25, 1996, and he had been the wing’s historian for three months. With little training and less experience, he found himself as one of the key contributors to documenting the tragedy

  • Around the Air Force: June 24

    In this look around the Air Force, Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. Mark A. Welsh III's career is celebrated at his retirement ceremony; one of two of the surviving members of the Doolittle Raiders dies; the 2016 Department of Defense Warrior Games came to a close; and a new episode of BLUE

  • BLUE: Khobar Towers

    Air Force TV has released the latest episode of the Air Force's flagship television program, BLUE. On June 25, 1996, the U.S. Air Force experienced one of the most horrific attacks in its history. Three Airmen look back on the incident and how it changed them and the Air Force -- forever.