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Mildenhall pilot 'hits' wall, keeps on running

Capt. Danny Franz, 67th Special Operations Squadron, poses for a self-portrait at the end of Hadrian's Wall Path, after he ran it May 14. Hadrian's Wall itself is 73 miles long, but the path stretches for 84 miles. Captain Franz ran Hadrian's Wall Path in 19 hours and 24 minutes, beating the unofficial record of just over 23 hours. It runs along a riverside route in Tyneside, through farmland in Tynedale, Northumberland, and gradually descends to the pastures of Cumbria, before finally ending at the salt marshes of the Solway Estuary. (Courtesy photo)

Capt. Danny Franz poses for a self-portrait at the end of Hadrian's Wall Path after he ran it May 14, 2010, in England. Hadrian's Wall itself is 73 miles long, but the path stretches for 84 miles. Captain Franz, a pilot with the 67th Special Operations Squadron, ran the wall in 19 hours and 24 minutes, beating the unofficial record of more than 23 hours. (Courtesy photo)

Capt. Danny Franz, 67th Special Operations Squadron, runs the Hadrian's Wall Path May 14. Hadrian's Wall itself is 73 miles long, but the path stretches for 84 miles. It runs along a riverside route in Tyneside, through farmland in Tynedale, Northumberland, and gradually descends to the pastures of Cumbria, before finally ending at the salt marshes of the Solway Estuary. Captain Franz ran the wall in 19 hours and 24 minutes, beating the unofficial record of just over 23 hours. (Courtesy photo)

Capt. Danny Franz runs the Hadrian's Wall Path May 14, 2010, in England. Hadrian's Wall itself is 73 miles long, but the path stretches for 84 miles. Captain Franz, a pilot with the 67th Special Operations Squadron, ran the wall in 19 hours and 24 minutes, beating the unofficial record of more than 23 hours. (Courtesy photo)

ROYAL AIR FORCE MILDENHALL, England -- Many people have heard of runners "hitting the wall" when they run long distances, whether it's a 10K race, half-marathon or full marathon.

Other people, like Capt. Danny Franz, take it to the extreme. Instead of "hitting" the wall, he ran it - all 84 miles of it.

The "wall" in question was Hadrian's Wall, which spans England's peninsula between Wallsend, near Newcastle upon Tyne in the east, and Bowness-on-Solway on the west coast.

The 67th Special Operations Squadron C-130 pilot ran it all in one stretch, alone and finished it in just 19 hours and 24 minutes.

Built in 122 A.D. Hadrian's Wall is 73 miles long and is the largest ancient monument in northern Europe. However, its national trail, known as Hadrian's Wall Path, stretches 84 miles.

"A couple of years ago, I started to feel the itch again for long distance running," Captain Franz said. "I'd already done a couple of 100-mile marathons (in Colorado), and heard the wall was really cool to hike. But when someone mentioned that some British guys had run it, I figured, why not do that?"

One of the people he heard about ran it in a little more than 23 hours, so he decided he wanted to beat that time if he could.

"When I finished, I was told I'd beaten the unofficial record," he said. "When I saw my time was under 20 hours, I was really happy, though I had originally wanted to do it in under 17 hours."

He took the first steps of the trek at 1 a.m. and finished just before 8:30 p.m. that night.

"I had a backpack with 3 liters of water, six muffins, some energy shots of caffeine and a guidebook," he said. " I also had another pouch with an extra liter of water, my phone and wallet."

The pilot said he ran most of the time, but would walk for a few minutes every so often, to give himself a break.

"I set a target pace of 12 minutes a mile, and kept checking to make sure I was keeping to it," he said. "In some places I was running a 10-minute mile, so every mile or two I allowed myself to walk for a couple of minutes, to take the load off my legs.

"But I was constantly moving the whole time - if you have a break, you don't tend to keep going afterwards, you kind of just stay there. So it's better, for me at least, to just keep going," he said.

Captain Franz said his legs were sore and started to cramp up around the 50-mile mark, which was made worse by the constant stopping and starting when going through farm gates.

Running such a long distance all in one go requires strict training in advance. The pilot said he runs almost every day, allowing himself one day off a week.

"If I'm not training, I'll run 3 to 6 miles a day; on weekends, I'll go for a 12-mile run. When I'm training, I do sprints and run farther," he said.

The captain said, running 84 miles alone gives a person plenty of time to reflect.

"There's so much to think about - what's coming up next week or next year, your past, memories or imagining yourself in an event," he said, adding that he likes running without headphones most of the time, so he can take it all in and enjoy the scenery.

Pushing yourself to run that distance certainly takes a toll on your mind as well as body, he explained.

"To do that distance is more of a mental game you have to play. Physically, as long as I stayed at my 12-minute mile and drank lots of water, I was OK."

During the daytime, the weather was really good, and pretty warm, he said, adding that there were no trees or shelter. He was also running directly into the wind most of the way, which he said slowed him down a little.

"I like the feeling you get miles, and hours, into the run. You get such an adrenalin rush, and it's a pretty euphoric feeling," Captain Franz said, adding that he likes doing long runs by himself or with a handful of people, rather than with huge crowds.

"It was a pretty good experience," Captain Franz said. "The last five miles I was hurting pretty bad, and with three miles to go, I started feeling dizzy and found it tough to keep focused on the road because I'd run out of water several miles back."

At the end of the run he went to the bed and breakfast where he was staying that night. Chatting with the owner, he told him he'd just run the wall in under 20 hours, and now he was desperate for something to eat.

The owner, surprised and amazed at the achievement, recommended the local pub, though he said they usually stopped serving food at 8 p.m. But after seeing the disappointment, and look of hunger, on Captain Franz's face, he phoned the pub landlord and explained what his guest had just done, and was told to send him over immediately.

"They served me a huge meal, which they had waiting for me when I arrived and gave me a drink on the house," Captain Franz said. "Word had obviously gotten out because other people started buying me drinks as well. They all treated me really well," he said. "Everyone at the pub was really excited.

"There was also a book there, signed by people who have hiked the path, with a page just for those who'd run it, and the landlord made sure I signed it too."

He said the feeling of having finished was wonderful, though physically he felt really drained.

"It was such an awesome feeling of relief and accomplishment; I couldn't really take it all in at first - it hits you more the next day," he said. "I was aching pretty bad in the morning, and found it pretty hard to climb the stairs."

The pilot said he felt almost back to normal on Monday, and though he was still aching a bit, he tried to hide it from his work colleagues.

So, with two 100-mile runs, three marathons and now this 84-mile run under his belt, Danny Franz's next goal will have to be big.

And it is.

"I also do a lot of triathlon training. My plan is to do an Iron Man competition fast enough to qualify for the one in Hawaii," he said, explaining that an Iron Man contest involves a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run.

With as much passion and dedication as this 67th SOS pilot has for fitness and running, it seems his goal of competing in the Iron Man contest will be a walk in the park.

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