C-37A


Mission
The C-37A is a twin-engine, turbofan aircraft acquired to fill the worldwide special air missions for high-ranking government and Defense Department officials.

Features
The aircraft contains a modern flight management system with a worldwide satellite-based Global Positioning System. The C-37A is based upon the high-altitude, intercontinental Gulfstream V aircraft, capable of cruise operations from 41,000 to 51,000 feet. Features include enhanced weather radar, autopilot and an ultra modern heads up display for the pilot. Safety features include Enhanced Vision Systems that allows increased visibility in all weather environments. The aircraft is also equipped with both commercial and military communications equipment to provide secure and non-secure voice and data capability.

Background
The 89th Airlift Wing's 99th Airlift Squadron, Andrews Air Force Base, Md., operates four C-37A's. The 6th Air Mobility Wing's 310th Airlift Squadron, MacDill AFB, Fla., operates three C-37A's. Both the 15th Airlift Wing, 65th Airlift Squadron at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, and the 86th Airlift Wing, 309th Airlift Squadron, at Chievres Air Base, Belgium, have one C-37A.

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Special air missions
Builder: Gulfstream Aerospace Corp.
Power Plant: Two BMW/Rolls Royce BR710A1-10 high bypass ratio turbofan engines
Thrust: 14,750 pounds each engine
Length: 96 feet, 5 inches (29.38 meters)
Height: 25 feet, 11 inches (7.9 meters)
Wingspan: 93 feet, 6 inches (28.5 meters)
Speed: 600 mph (.885 Mach) maximum
Maximum Altitude: 51,000 feet (15,545 meters)
Maximum Takeoff Weight: 90,500 pounds (41,050 kilograms)
Range: 6,300 miles (5,500 nautical miles) normal cruise
Load: 12 passengers
Unit Cost: $36 million (1998 constant dollars)
Crew: Five
Date Deployed: 1998
Inventory: Active force, 9; Air National Guard, 0; Reserve, 0

(Current as of May 2014)