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Col. John Boudreaux suffered a critical sudden cardiac arrest in 2016. He was dead for several minutes. Less than six percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims survive the trip to the hospital: His doctors gave him less than one percent. Today, as a group commander at Cannon Air Force Base, N. M., he bears the scars that remind him for every one of him, there are 99 others buried in the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Lane T. Plummer) A commander’s story of survival
The sound of tire treads rolling over a smooth driveway was the only sound that could be heard on the street Col. John Boudreaux lived when he and his wife, Susi, pulled up to it. Susi shoved the gear shift to “Park.” She couldn’t do it fast enough, and sat back in the seat for a moment. She collected her thoughts as she closed her eyes and let her head fall back into the headrest. Her mind raced faster than her car could.
0 11/22
2017
Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James addresses Airmen during an all call Feb. 19, 2015, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. James spoke about Air Force Global Strike Command’s Force Improvement Program successes and the future of the nuclear mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Delia Marchick) SecAF, AFGSC commander visit Malmstrom
Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James and Air Force Global Strike Commander Lt. Gen. Stephen Wilson visited Malmstrom Air Force Base Feb. 19, to meet with Airmen, specifically those who deploy to the missile fields, and see benefits of the grass-roots feedback program known as the Force Improvement Program before the Nuclear Oversight Board at Minot AFB, North Dakota.
3 2/20
2015
Tech. Sgt. Robert Richards and Airman 1st Class Benjamin Vlietstra  look over a guided missile maintenance platform motor Jan. 21, 2015, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. All 17 of the 341st Missile Wing’s GMMPs -- also known as work cages -- were available for service Jan. 14, ensuring that missile maintenance in Minuteman III launch facilities stays on schedule. Richards is a mechanical and pneudraulics section team chief and team trainer, and Vlietstra is a power, refrigeration and electrical laboratory technician with the 341st Maintenance Operations Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo/John Turner) MAPS, PREL achieve all work cages ready for duty
All 17 of the 341st Missile Wing's guided missile maintenance platforms (GMMP) became available for field use Jan. 14, according to Lt. Col. John Briner, the 341st Missile Operations Squadron commander. This feat is unprecedented in recent memory.
0 1/27
2015
Tech. Sgt. Michelle Bresson performs a pre-flight inspection Nov. 5, 2014, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont. Bresson is a 40th Helicopter Squadron special missions aviator and her responsibilities typically include keeping the pilots advised of anything that is going on with the aircraft – if there are any malfunctions with the aircraft, the aviators are the system experts. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Joshua Smoot) Aviator helps pilots fly in Big Sky Country
Tech. Sgt. Michelle Bresson, a 40th Helicopter Squadron special missions aviator, has been assisting helicopter pilots at Malmstrom Air Force Base for nearly five years. Her responsibilities typically include keeping the pilots advised of anything that is going on with the aircraft. If there are any malfunctions with the aircraft, special missions aviators are the system experts. They are the ones that are going to be giving pilots advice on what could possibly be going wrong.
0 11/25
2014
First Lt. William D. Bernier, of Augusta, Mont., was reported missing April 10, 1944, when his B-24D Liberator was shot down over New Guinea while attacking a Japanese-held port. Bernier was assigned to the 90th Bomb Group, 321st Bomb Squadron, and was the bombardier in a 12-man crew that day. (Air Force graphic/Robert Stillwell) WWII Airman lost in Pacific brought home to Montana after 70 year wait
Seven decades after his aircraft was shot down during a mission in World War II, an Army Air Forces aviator finally came home to Augusta, Montana.
1 9/22
2014
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