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Col. Theresa Medina, 319th Medical Group commander, poses for a photo at her desk Oct. 30, 2017, at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Medina was diagnosed with stage one breast cancer a few years ago and overcame the illness with the help of Tricare and the support of family and friends. (U.S. Air Force photo by SrA Cierra Presentado) MDG commander battles breast cancer with the help of Tricare
“I knew my life was going to change, I knew I was not in control, and that’s what scared me the most.” These are the thoughts that ran through Col. Theresa Medina’s mind as she was notified that she was diagnosed with breast cancer.
0 10/31
2017
Chief Master Sgt. Yolanda Jennings works on a project with Senior Airman Jameka Ruta, Oct. 14, 2015. Jennings is a breast cancer survivor. (U.S. Air Force photo/Melanie Rodgers Cox) Air Force chief’s resilience conquers breast cancer
Chief Master Sgt. Yolanda Jennings recalled that when doctors diagnosed her with breast cancer in September 2008 she was not surprised, but she was scared.
0 10/24
2015
Default Air Force Logo AF health officials stress need for breast cancer screenings
Breast cancer screening is the best method to detect breast cancer early and has been found to lower the risk of dying from breast cancer.
0 10/14
2015
Capt. Candice Adams and her fiance Maj. Ryan Ismirle say their goodbyes before Adams is taken to surgery for a bilateral mastectomy on May 5, 2011. 
Note to breast cancer: 'I am not your victim'
What is often forgotten in the sea of pink are the individuals on the front lines who are actually fighting the disease. In the three months between the time football players stop wearing pink shoes and the Super Bowl, roughly 58,000 women and 500 men in the U.S. will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and they each have a story.
4 10/23
2013
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