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Hurricane Michael evacuees from Tyndall AFB operating from bases across the Southeast

Master Sgt. Kristen Redmon, a Tyndall Air Force Base civilian reservist, works in a temporary office at Maxwell Air Force Base overlooking the National Operations Center at Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters. Redmon relocated to Maxwell AFB, Ala., before Hurricane Michael hit the Tyndall AFB area. (Civil Air Patrol photo by Susan Schneider)

Master Sgt. Kristen Redmon, a Tyndall Air Force Base civilian reservist, works in a temporary office at Maxwell Air Force Base overlooking the National Operations Center at Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters. Redmon relocated to Maxwell AFB, Ala., before Hurricane Michael hit the Tyndall AFB area. (Civil Air Patrol photo by Susan Schneider)

Lt. Col. Jim Clay, 1st Air Force director of Civil Air Patrol operations, is
one of several Hurricane Michael evacuees now working in CAP National
Headquarters at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. His temporary office is set up
in CAP's National Operations Center. (Civil Air Patrol photo by Susan
Schneider)

Lt. Col. Jim Clay, 1st Air Force director of Civil Air Patrol operations, is one of several Hurricane Michael evacuees now working in CAP National Headquarters at Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. His temporary office is set up in CAP's National Operations Center. (Civil Air Patrol photo by Susan Schneider)

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, Ala. (AFNS) -- It was seemingly a normal day in Panama City Beach, Florida. But stormy winds and rising tides hinted at the devastation that was to come. Thousands of residents there and in surrounding areas were ordered to evacuate. Among the evacuees who did were some 3,500 Tyndall Air Force Base employees. Some of them are now operating from Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters at Maxwell AFB, Alabama.

“I knew something was going on,” said Master Sgt. Kristen Redmon, whose waterfront home on the lagoon is only a 5-minute car ride from the beach. “The water was encroaching on the dock and it was starting to get breezy.”

Knowing it would be irresponsible to stay when texts from the Air Force were mandating evacuation, she and her husband Geno, the cat Boo and dog Boogers loaded up in the car with maybe three days of clothing and an ice chest filled with basic items from the fridge. They left a supply of water and a generator for her best friend, a neighbor who planned to ride out the storm.

The Redmons left two days ahead of the hurricane but stayed in touch with the neighbor, who gave them a firsthand account of the storm via cellphone.
“I could hear the wind howling and the roof being ripped off,” she said.

In the middle of their conversation, they lost communications, she said. A tear eased down her cheek as she recalled that terrifying moment, not knowing for several days that her friend had survived.

At Maxwell AFB, Redmon is doing the job she performed at Tyndall AFB. She said the base, and her home, are seriously damaged. In addition to windows being blown out, shingles ripped off the roof, the attic being lifted and sucked into the home and 1/4-inch of water standing inside, the house is “dented all over” and the wrought iron fence now “looks like a tent.”

Her past experiences with an earthquake and ice storms don’t compare to the “tornado with water in it,” but like many of Hurricane Michael’s victims, she feels embarrassed to say she has damage.

“Our friends’ damage is really bad compared to ours,” she said.

The Southwest Airlines flight attendant, who works in Tyndall’s air operations control center as a civilian reservist, is on orders at Maxwell AFB for now, helping maintain Tyndall AFB’s operations.

Geno, a retired Air Force colonel, is back at the beach helping their neighbors recover.

“He took a trailer, backhoe, water and eight tanks of diesel fuel down there,” Redmon said. “He’s exhausted emotionally and physically but there are only so many handymen workers and a ton of destruction.”

Lt. Col. Jim Clay, 1st Air Force director of CAP operations, feels lucky as well, though his home on Deer Point Lake on Panama City’s North Bay also suffered extensive damage.

“My damage was not as bad as others. It could have been a lot worse,” he said, referring to the 40 trees knocked down on his property, a boat dock ripped apart, broken windows, water intrusion and damage to the roof and soffits.

“No one got out of this storm without some type of damage,” said Clay, who shared heartwarming stories of the many selfless ways in which people responded to pleas for help issued on social media, via text message and radio station blasts. “Neighbors are helping neighbors.”

“People are bringing gas cans and gas money, offering supplies and alerting emergency service providers regarding critical needs, like help in keeping the generators running at a school serving as a storm shelter,” Clay said. “Coy Pilson (the principal) was manning the shelter and taking care of the needs of the community, putting their needs before his own.”

Looking to the future, Clay noted there are a lot of unknowns.

“There is no power, no water, no place to buy fuel, no place to buy food. Most have to travel to Dothan, Alabama (over 80 miles) to get fuel and supplies and most don’t have a place to go back to work,” he said.

Tyndall AFB evacuees are spread out across the Southern U.S., said Col. Mark Wootan, Civil Air Patrol-U.S. Air Force vice commander.

“Several 1st Air Force folks were invited to come here (Maxwell AFB). It makes them feel they still belong to a family, a team and it gives them a place to put down their hat,” he said.

“Their lives have been completely interrupted,” he continued. “We are opening the doors to them, our colleagues, so they can continue to work and function. It’s the right thing to do to help them get back to normal.”

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