HomeNewsArticle Display

US, Qatari partners participate in crime scene liaison exchange

U.S. Special Agent Chad Hutchins, center, Forensics Science Consultant from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga., looks at a can which he dusted with neon fingerprint powder to enhance a fingerprint during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar.  During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts exchanged different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. Fingerprint powders have various formulations, and the appropriate powder must be used on the appropriate surface. For example, dark colored powders will show up a fingerprint far better on a light surface. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins)

U.S. Special Agent Chad Hutchins, center, looks at a can which he dusted with neon fingerprint powder to enhance a fingerprint during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar. During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts exchanged different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. Fingerprint powders have various formulations, and the appropriate powder must be used on the appropriate surface. For example, dark colored powders will show up a fingerprint far better on a light surface. Hutchins is a Forensics Science Consultant from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kia Atkins)

U.S. Special Agent Chad Hutchins, Forensics Science Consultant from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga., demonstrates how he dusts for fingerprints on a can during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar. During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts shared different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins)

U.S. Special Agent Chad Hutchins demonstrates how he dusts for fingerprints on a can during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar. During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts shared different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. Hutchins is a Forensics Science Consultant from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kia Atkins)

U.S. Special Agent Chad Hutchins, center, Forensics Science Consultant from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga., discusses fingerprinting techniques with members of the Qatar Ministry of Interior’s Crime Scene Processing Unit during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar. During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts shared different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kia Atkins)

U.S. Special Agent Chad Hutchins demonstrates how he dusts for fingerprints on a can during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar. During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts shared different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. Hutchins is a Forensics Science Consultant from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Brunswick, Ga. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Kia Atkins)

Handprints made with synthetic blood are shown on a piece of fabric during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar. During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts shared different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. The synthetic blood handprints were used to show blood spatter that would normally be invisible to the naked eye, but is captured using luminol spray. (Courtesy photo)

Handprints made with synthetic blood are shown on a piece of fabric during a liaison exchange, March 3, 2015, at the Criminal Evidence and Information Department, Ar-Rayyan, Qatar. During the liaison exchange, members from Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and their Qatari counterparts shared different forensic methods they use when investigating a crime scene. The synthetic blood handprints were used to show blood spatter that would normally be invisible to the naked eye, but is captured using luminol spray. (Courtesy photo)

AL UDEID AIR BASE, Qatar (AFNS) -- U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations Detachment 241 and members of the Qatar Ministry of Interior's Crime Scene Processing Unit participated in a crime scene liaison exchange program here, March 2 through March 6.

During the exchange, AFOSI agents and their Qatari counterparts shared crime scene investigation techniques to familiarize themselves with each other’s practices.

"Doing this preparation now allows us to process crime scenes quicker so that military commanders and senior leaders can make decisions about investigations and cases,” said Maj. Etai Shpak, the AFOSI Detachment 241 commander. “It also lets us know what they would need to do at a crime scene so that we can respect each other's procedures."

Throughout the week, AFOSI and their Qatari counterparts went over the techniques they use for lifting fingerprints, taking shoe or tire impressions, collecting DNA, analyzing blood spatter analysis, taking crime scene photography and what they do when they initially arrive at a crime scene.

“The main goal this week was to learn from each other in terms of processing a crime scene,” Shpak said. “Unfortunately, crimes do happen and when they do we need to be able to respond quickly so we can get the forensic evidence we need to collect from the scene for analysis.”

Although there were minor differences in how each country process crime scenes, sharing techniques and learning from each other helped both AFOSI agents and the Qatari Crime Scene Processing Unit members see the variances, so they could better process any crime scenes together in the future.

"We have a very good relationship for Qatar and America, working with them for business, for anything,” said Capt. Hassan Salem Al Dosari, the Qatar Ministry of Interior's Crime Scene Processing Unit flight commander. “It was a good experience, exchange for ideas, anything new in technology; it was very useful for us to see how we work together."

With the help of Qatari law enforcement personnel, AFOSI agents can more effectively process investigations.

“Working and preparing with our Qatari counterparts ahead of time allows us to work better alongside each other at a crime scene,” Shpak said. “This liaison exchange program isn’t about just bringing experts together to share their crime scene knowledge, but to also build relationships with our Qatari partners.”

Engage

Facebook Twitter
Today is #MedalofHonorDay and we take a moment to honor our nation’s greatest heroes who have received the highest… https://t.co/B5CVsuV3vX
From foster kid to #Airman, mentor and raising the #AirForce’s next generation. @TeamMisawa https://t.co/7NmxHqOJGe https://t.co/vVoVVnjEgf
Riveting story! Learn more about Ms. Mae Krier, a #WorldWarII pioneer who joined legions of other Rosies in the wor… https://t.co/0QUBOzh4Rr
RT @HollomanAFB: Happy #NationalPuppyDay! Our #MilitaryWorkingDogs protect and defend us each and everyday. Check out these #adorable photo…
RT @AirForceMag: HIT THE BOOKS: Check out a non-exhaustive list of Air Force Chief of Staff @GenDaveGoldfein's reading recommendations from…
Some of us are women, but we are all Airmen! #WomensHistoryMonth https://t.co/pcBtWWIiE6
.@GenDaveGoldfein: "Celebration of #diversity and making sure we understand the flesh colored band aids is not abou… https://t.co/iUqNbSpCPB
.@RAFMildenhall #KC135 crew strengthened relationship with Romanian #AirForce through air refueling training. For m… https://t.co/8dGvm2HQwC
RT @SecAFOfficial: Mother nature can’t beat the 55th Wing! We will recover @Offutt_AFB from the devastating flood. Amazing American 🇺🇸 spir…
Today the #AirForce announced a new Infrastructure Investment Strategy following a yearlong review that brings a ne… https://t.co/i1yDRQkaPl
RT @Offutt_AFB: As the water has begun to recede, Team Offutt is in full recovery mode. https://t.co/6QPZ96UNZY
RT @SecAFOfficial: Thanks to Iowa leaders who just signed a bill to recognize out of state licenses for our military spouses! @SenJoniErnst
RT @SecAFOfficial: This will make a difference on our bases for decades to come...getting more out of every dollar we spend on #infrastruct
See how our aircraft maintainers keep our #F15s safe and mission ready! @142ndFW https://t.co/H6CrSoCCIg
RT @NASA: During today's spacewalk, we'll be taking questions about our @NASA_Astronauts' excursion outside of the @Space_Station. Ask ques…
RT @US_Stratcom: Global #StrategicDeterrence! Integrating #B52s from @US_EUCOM & @INDOPACOM to conduct simultaneous theater familiarization…
The #KC135 Stratotanker nose art "Black Jack" dates back to the #BloodyHundredth's battle-hardened days of… https://t.co/43zMmRWnsP
Whether our aircraft are taking off, landing or in need of assistance, air traffic controller #Airmen are active ye… https://t.co/eBlrhUI7mQ
#WeCanDoIt! The #USAF wishes a #HappyBirthday to one of the original “Rosie the Riveters,” Ms. Mae Krier, who turne… https://t.co/n24xC5NClI