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Air Force Inspection Agency

Air Force Inspection Agency shield (color), U.S. Air Force graphic.  In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

Air Force Inspection Agency shield (color), U.S. Air Force graphic. In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

Air Force Inspection Agency fact sheet banner. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Andy Yacenda, Defense Media Activity-San Antonio)

Air Force Inspection Agency fact sheet banner. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Andy Yacenda, Defense Media Activity-San Antonio)

Air Force Inspection Agency web banner. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Andy Yacenda, Defense Media Activity-San Antonio)

Air Force Inspection Agency web banner. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Andy Yacenda, Defense Media Activity-San Antonio)

Air Force Inspection Agency shield (color), U.S. Air Force graphic.  In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

Air Force Inspection Agency shield (color), U.S. Air Force graphic. In accordance with Chapter 3 of AFI 84-105, commercial reproduction of this emblem is NOT permitted without the permission of the proponent organizational/unit commander.

The Air Force Inspection Agency (AFIA), headquartered at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, is a Field Operating Agency (FOA) that reports to the Secretary of the Air Force Inspector General (SAF/IG).

Mission
AFIA is a diverse team of experts providing independent inspection, evaluation, oversight, training and analysis to advance continuous improvement of mission effectiveness at all Air Force levels.

Vision
The core of the Air Force Inspection System … leading change … empowering commanders … upholding the integrity of the Air Force

Commander’s Priorities

- Independent, objective inspection and evaluation

- Oversight and standardization of the IG enterprise

- Educating and training the Inspectors General

- Analysis of inspections to drive better decisions


Organization
AFIA is composed of six directorates: Enterprise Support, Inspections, Medical Operations, Mission Support, Nuclear Inspections, and Oversight and Evaluation.

Duties and Responsibilities


• Integrates medical inspectors with Major Command (MAJCOM) Inspector General (IG) teams to conduct Unit Effectiveness Inspections (UEI) 


Collaborates with the Air Force Surgeon General’s office, the Air Force Medical Operations Agency and the MAJCOM on policies and procedures pertaining to UEIs

Inspects radioactive material permits issued to authorized Air Force users under the master materials license granted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

• Provides oversight of MAJCOM-conducted Nuclear Surety Inspections (NSI) and select initial NSIs to assess MAJCOM IG performance and provide The Inspector General (TIG), Chief of Staff of the Air Force (CSAF) and Secretary of the Air Force (SecAF) an independent perspective of the safety, security and reliability of units and nuclear weapons


Integrates a Core Team of nuclear inspectors with MAJCOM IG teams to conduct NSIs

Provides standardized basic, nuclear, and management inspection training for Air Force inspectors and augmentees

• Observes the conduct and performance of MAJCOM IG teams during all inspection types and provides feedback to IGs and SAF/IG on their effectiveness to improve and standardize processes across the Air Force Inspection System (AFIS)


Independently conducts unit effectiveness, management, statutory and special interest item inspections for Air  Force-level forward operating agencies (FOA) and direct reporting units (DRU)

When directed, evaluates and reports on high-impact, high-visibility programs that are of significant interest to SecAF, CSAF or SAF/IG

Serves as the Air Force gatekeeper to manage the centralized Air Force inspection schedule which includes all inspection activities by external, non-Air Force agencies

Consolidates and reports statutory information to Congress and the Department of Defense

Provides subject-matter expertise related to training, inspections, and other activities directed or supported by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Instruction 3263.05B, Nuclear Weapons Technical Inspections

• Plans and conducts management inspections of Air Force MAJCOM HQs and Air Staff Directorates to report on their efficiency, economy, and discipline


• Conducts Air Force-wide analysis on IG inspections to identify systemic issues, trends, and leading indicators across the Air Force allowing senior leaders to make data-driven decisions


Manages the Inspector General Inspection Reporting System (TIGIRS), a collection of information technology systems and capabilities that provide inspection scheduling, planning, execution, and post-inspection analysis and reporting

• Prepares and publishes TIG Brief which communicates to the Air Force relevant information about the full spectrum of IG activities.

• Maintains an appropriate staff to provide legal reviews/recommendations to the command team

 

• Processes UEI surveys for all Major Command Inspectors General

 

• Provides A1 and A6 support for all AFIA personnel

 

• Serves as the lead agent for Air Force Wounded, Ill, and Injured inspection


History

AFIA traces its roots back to 1927 when the US Army Chief of the Air Corps established an Inspection Division to perform technical inspections in support of flight safety objectives. By the end of World War II, this function was aligned under the Air Inspector. In July 1948, Air Force Letter No. 20-4 directed consolidation of Headquarters U.S. Air Force inspection activities at Kelly AFB, Texas, and provided for inspectors general at echelons of command below Headquarters U.S. Air Force.

 

On Sept. 20, 1950, the Vice Chief of Staff authorized the creation of a Directorate of Technical Inspections at Norton AFB. Organized operations began in February 1951 with 128 officers, 29 noncommissioned officers and 31 civilians. Duties for this function included evaluations of and recommended improvements to the maintenance, modification and overhaul of aircraft, related components and equipment.

 

To complete the consolidation of activities required for effectively conducting its technical inspection mission, in August 1951, the Deputy IG at Norton AFB subsumed the Directorate of Procurement and Supply Inspection which was transferred from the Pentagon. By the end of 1952, the Directorate of Readiness Inspection was also moved from the Deputy IG at Kelly AFB to Norton AFB to become the Directorate of Readiness and Materiel Inspections.

 

On Jan. 7, 1963, the Deputy Inspectors General for Safety and Inspections were combined to establish the U.S. Air Force Deputy Inspector General; however, safety activities were still divided. The Directorate of Aerospace Safety remained at Norton AFB while the Directorate of Nuclear Safety resided at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. Under this plan, a single deputy was responsible for the Air Force Inspection System and safety programs. 


In July 1964, the Office of Assistant for Medical Services was formed within the Deputy Inspector General organization, and the first legal advisor was assigned in June 1965.

On Dec. 31, 1971, the Air Force Inspection and Safety Center (AFISC) was activated to replace the 1002nd Inspector General Group.

As a result of the Goldwater-Nichols Act, the Inspector General moved directly under the Secretary of the Air Force in September 1986. During this period, AFISC began planning for a new concept of multi-MAJCOM inspections, which were implemented in 1987 and1988.

Congress approved closure of Norton AFB in 1990, and AFISC began initial planning to move its operation to Kirtland AFB, New Mexico.  In August 1991, the center was divided into the Air Force Inspection Agency and the Air Force Safety Agency (now the Air Force Safety Center). Both organizations settled at Kirtland AFB in July 1993.

(Current as of November 2016)

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