HomeAbout UsFact SheetsDisplay

KC-135 Stratotanker

A KC-135 Stratotanker sits on the flightline at Manas Air Base, Kyrgyzstan, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2006. Ground crews will have to de-ice the tanker before it can take off on a refueling mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Paul Clifford)

A KC-135 Stratotanker sits on the flightline at Manas Air Base, Kyrgyzstan. Ground crews will have to de-ice the tanker before it can take off on a refueling mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Paul Clifford)

FILE PHOTO --A KC-135R Stratotanker assigned to the 6th Air Refueling Wing, 91st Air Refueling Squadron, at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., flies a training mission over central Florida. The KC-135's principal mission is air refueling. This asset greatly enhances the U. S. Air Force's capability to accomplish its mission of Global Engagement. It also provides aerial refueling support to U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps and allied aircraft. Four turbofans, mounted under 35-degree swept wings, power the KC-135 to takeoffs at gross weights up to 322,500 pounds. Nearly all internal fuel can be pumped through the tanker's flying boom, the KC-135's primary fuel transfer method. A special shuttlecock-shaped drogue, attached to and trailed behind the flying boom, may be used to refuel aircraft fitted with probes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Keith Reed)

AF File Image

FILE PHOTO -- The KC-135 Stratotanker's primary mission is to refuel long-range bombers. It also provides aerial refueling support to Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and allied aircraft. Four turbojets, mounted under wings swept 35 degrees, power the KC-135. Nearly all internal fuel can be pumped through the tanker's flying boom, the KC-135's primary fuel transfer method. A special shuttlecock-shaped drogue, attached to and trailed behind the flying boom, is used to refuel aircraft fitted with probes. An operator stationed in the rear of the plane controls the boom. A cargo deck above the refueling system holds passengers or cargo. Depending on fuel storage configuration, the KC-135 can carry up to 83,000 pounds (37,350 kilograms) of cargo. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Dave Nolan)

AF File Image

141st in action.  KC-135 doing its mission over Mt. Rainier.

141st in action. KC-135 doing its mission over Mt. Rainier.

Mission

The KC-135 Stratotanker provides the core aerial refueling capability for the United States Air Force and has excelled in this role for more than 60 years. This unique asset enhances the Air Force's capability to accomplish its primary mission of global reach. It also provides aerial refueling support to Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and allied nation aircraft. The KC-135 is also capable of transporting litter and ambulatory patients using patient support pallets during aeromedical evacuations.

Features

Four turbofans, mounted under 35-degree swept wings, power the KC-135 to takeoffs at gross weights of up to 322,500 pounds. A cargo deck above the refueling system can hold a mixed load of passengers and cargo. Depending on fuel storage configuration, the KC-135 can carry up to 83,000 pounds of cargo.

Nearly all internal fuel can be pumped through the flying boom, the KC-135's primary fuel transfer method. One crewmember, known as the boom operator, is stationed in the rear of the plane and controls the boom during in-flight air refueling.

A special shuttlecock-shaped drogue attached to and trailing behind the flying boom may be used to refuel aircraft fitted with probes. Some aircraft have been configured with the multipoint refueling system, which consists of special pods mounted on the wingtips. These KC-135s are capable of refueling two receiver aircraft at the same time.

Background

Air Mobility Command manages an inventory of 396 Stratotankers, of which the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard fly 243 aircraft in support of AMC's mission.

The Boeing Company's model 367-80 was the basic design for the commercial 707 passenger plane as well as the KC-135A Stratotanker. In 1954, the Air Force purchased the first 29 of its future 732-plane fleet. The first aircraft flew in August 1956 and the initial production Stratotanker was delivered to Castle Air Force Base, Calif., in June 1957. The last KC-135 was delivered to the Air Force in 1965.

Of the original KC-135As, more than 417 were modified with new CFM-56 engines produced by CFM-International. The re-engined tanker, designated either the KC-135R or KC-135T, can offload 50 percent more fuel, is 25 percent more fuel efficient, costs 25 percent less to operate and is 96 percent quieter than the KC-135A.

Under another modification program, a re-engined tanker with the TF-33-PW-102 engine was designated the KC-135E. In 2009, the last KC-135E retired from the inventory.

Through the years, the KC-135 has been altered to do other jobs ranging from flying command post missions to reconnaissance. RC-135s are used for special reconnaissance and Air Force Materiel Command's NKC-135As are flown in test programs. Air Combat Command operates the OC-135 as an observation platform in compliance with the Open Skies Treaty.

The KC-135R and KC-135T aircraft continue to undergo life-cycle upgrades to expand their capabilities and improve reliability. Among these are improved communications, navigation, autopilot and surveillance equipment to meet future civil air traffic control needs.

General Characteristics

Primary Function: Aerial refueling and airlift

Prime Contractor: The Boeing Company

Power Plant: CFM International CFM-56 turbofan engines

Thrust: 21,634 pounds each engine

Wingspan: 130 feet, 10 inches (39.88 meters)

Length: 136 feet, 3 inches (41.53 meters)

Height: 41 feet, 8 inches (12.7 meters)

Speed: 530 miles per hour at 30,000 feet (9,144 meters)

Ceiling: 50,000 feet (15,240 meters)

Range: 1,500 miles (2,419 kilometers) with 150,000 pounds (68,039 kilograms) of transfer fuel; ferry mission, up to 11,015 miles (17,766 kilometers)

Maximum Takeoff Weight: 322,500 pounds (146,285 kilograms)

Maximum Transfer Fuel Load: 200,000 pounds (90,719 kilograms)

Maximum Cargo Capability: 83,000 pounds (37,648 kilograms), 37 passengers

Pallet Positions: 6

Crew: Three: pilot, co-pilot and boom operator. Some KC-135 missions require the addition of a navigator. The Air Force has a limited number of navigator suites that can be installed for unique missions.

Aeromedical Evacuation Crew: A basic crew of five (two flight nurses and three medical technicians) is added for aeromedical evacuation missions. Medical crew may be altered as required by the needs of patients.

Unit Cost: $39.6 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars)

Date Deployed: August 1956

Inventory: Active duty, 153; Air National Guard, 171; Air Force Reserve, 72.

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @ncaawrestling: .@AF_Wrestle is building something special and putting in the work on The Terrazzo #LetsFly https://t.co/N4GDrg6uF9 📸:…
RT @AF_SBIR_STTR: The Air Force tech accelerator AFWERX is dangling the prospect of an extra injection of capital for commercial startup fi…
RT @AETCommand: It's Week 2 of #NCSAM2019 and here are a few practices you can implement to defend your family and #becybersmart: verify an…
RT @GenDaveGoldfein: This past weekend our @AFThunderbirds and @rafredarrows put on an amazing show at the #PacificAirShow. I'm sure ACM Mi…
RT @AF_Falcons: “The cadets at the Air Force Academy have the best college football venue in the state of Colorado.” https://t.co/XKJMV1k…
RT @NASCARonNBC: "You guys are the real heroes of our country." Master Sgt. Chad Huggins took a joyride with Jeff Burton, presented by @To
RT @30thSpaceWing: #ICYMI An unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile was launched during an operational test Wednesday, Oc…
A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon assigned to Spangdahlem AB, Germany, crashed near Zemmer, Germany, during a r… https://t.co/ugrVTbeQNB
We are one month out from our next Pitch Day! This initiate will help provide emerging, smarter technologies to our… https://t.co/auyQUFANyY
RT @PACAF: Medics from the @51stFW took part in multiple two-day Tactical Combat Casualty Care training courses that provides medical perso…
RT @Team_Tinker: She enlisted in the @usairforce in 1957. At 15 years in service, she achieved the rank of Chief Master Sergeant, making he…
RT @AETCommand: The @AF_Academy recently redesigned its Airmanship program, augmenting live flights with VR training to reach cadets who ma…
RT @AETCommand: 🙌🎉 Congratulations to the @usairforce's newest F-16 Viper pilots, who graduated Oct. 5 at @HollomanAFB!!!!! https://t.co/C…
RT @AstroHague: It’s been a long year...two safe landings, two emotional homecomings, one wild ride! https://t.co/ZvZBVZ3vj9
RT @AFResearchLab: Ted Harmer is an Electronics Engineer who finds ways to improve @usairforce training programs! His area of expertise cen…
RT @37thTRW: #ICYMI the new Air Force uniform is now officially the uniform issued to all who enter Basic Military Training! The trainees t…
RT @PACAF: A pair of 69th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-52's flying out of @AndersenAFBGuam performed a flyover of #Palau during Palau’s 25…
.@AFResearchLab's innovating a new material that can be integrated into garments. Find out more on this transferabl… https://t.co/E40jBU2tDa