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Air advisor teamwork enhances expeditionary Air Force compound

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgts. Adam Martin, a fire truck maintenance specialist, and Shawn Benton, an aerospace ground equipment craftsman, both deployed in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve and assigned to the 370th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group, Detachment 1, use a refrigerant recovery station to perform a leak test and charge the air conditioning system of a Humvee inside the vehicle maintenance tent at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq, July 2, 2017. The new vehicle maintenance facility improved efficiency for the maintainers as they can now not only get out of the sun to work on their vehicles, but also complete tasks during all hours of the day. CJTF-OIR is the global Coalition to defeat ISIS in Iraq and Syria.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Hehnly)

Staff Sgts. Adam Martin, a fire truck maintenance specialist, and Shawn Benton, an aerospace ground equipment craftsman, both deployed in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve and assigned to the 370th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group, Detachment 1, use a refrigerant recovery station to perform a leak test and charge the air conditioning system of a Humvee inside the vehicle maintenance tent at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq, July 2, 2017. The new vehicle maintenance facility improved efficiency for the maintainers as they can now not only get out of the sun to work on their vehicles, but also complete tasks during all hours of the day. CJTF-OIR is the global Coalition to defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria . (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Hehnly)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgts. Shawn Benton, an aerospace ground equipment craftsman, and. Adam Martin, a fire truck maintenance specialist, both deployed in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve and assigned to the 370th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group, Detachment 1, work together to charge the air conditioning system of a Humvee at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq, July 2, 2017. Benton often works outside of his scope to assist with vehicle maintenance and facility sustainment at the Air Force compound at Qayyarah West CJTF-OIR is the global Coalition to defeat ISIS in Iraq and Syria. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Hehnly)

Staff Sgts. Shawn Benton, an aerospace ground equipment craftsman, and. Adam Martin, a fire truck maintenance specialist, both deployed in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve and assigned to the 370th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group, Detachment 1, work together to charge the air conditioning system of a Humvee at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq, July 2, 2017. Benton often works outside of his scope to assist with vehicle maintenance and facility sustainment at the Air Force compound at Qayyarah West CJTF-OIR is the global Coalition to defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Hehnly)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Zachary Tilley, an expeditionary maintenance liaison specialist deployed in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve and assigned to the 370th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group, Detachment 1, performs a barbell squat in front of a makeshift squat rack in the 370th AEAG detachment’s “Iron Paradise” gym at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq, July 2, 2017. The air advisors built the “Iron Paradise” gym, which includes a makeshift squat rack, bench press, preacher curl bench and other recently acquired weights, creating an area often filled with Air Force and Army personnel trying to maintain physical fitness in their austere location. CJTF-OIR is the global Coalition to defeat ISIS in Iraq and Syria. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Hehnly)

Airman 1st Class Zachary Tilley, an expeditionary maintenance liaison specialist deployed in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve and assigned to the 370th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group, Detachment 1, performs a barbell squat in front of a makeshift squat rack in the 370th AEAG detachment’s “Iron Paradise” gym at Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq, July 2, 2017. The air advisors built the “Iron Paradise” gym, which includes a makeshift squat rack, bench press, preacher curl bench and other recently acquired weights, creating an area often filled with Air Force and Army personnel trying to maintain physical fitness in their austere location. CJTF-OIR is the global Coalition to defeat the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Jonathan Hehnly)

QAYYARAH WEST, Iraq (AFNS) -- Over the past four months, a small team of air advisors, deployed in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve to Qayyarah West Airfield, Iraq, combined its efforts to enhance and improve the U.S. Air Force’s compound, changing the working conditions for the Airmen assigned there.

When the 370th Air Expeditionary Advisory Group replaced the 123rd Contingency Response Group at Qayyarah West Airfield in early March 2017, they inherited bare bone facilities. The prior contingency response groups had built the U.S. Air Force’s part of Qayyarah West up from scratch to start operations, but their mission was not long term.

There was a small open tent used for a passenger terminal that exposed waiting service members to the heat, a canopy spread across two conex boxes used as a vehicle maintenance area, which provided limited protection from the sun, and some of the enclosed tents had mold and rotting wood floors.

The air advisors immediately identified the air terminal operations center tent had a mold issue that needed to be addressed, said Tech. Sgt. Joseph Tenebruso, the 370th AEAG, Detachment 1 expeditionary maintenance flight chief.

After Qayyarah West Airfield, commonly referred to as “Q-West,” was recaptured from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in October 2016, the U.S. Air Force promptly established a presence, repaired the destroyed airfield and made it ready to be used as a strategic launching pad for the offensive in Mosul.

From mid-October until early March, the 821st and 123rd CRGs deployed personnel to quickly open the airfield and establish, expand, sustain, and coordinate air mobility operations in the austere environment.

The current team from the 370th AEAG was the first air expeditionary force rotation, or permanent party, to call Q-West home outside of the short-term deployed CRG units assigned to rapidly establish operations.

“Everyone wanted to make this place better than what we came into,” said Staff Sgt. Peter Johnson, the NCO in charge of vehicle maintenance assigned to the 370th AEAG, Det. 1. “We identified the needs to better the compound trying to make things more efficient and safer. Everything we’ve done has a purpose and we worked together as a team to make the improvements happen.”

The small team of air advisors worked together to procure and establish tents used as a new passenger terminal, morale facility, vehicle maintenance tent and tactical operations center. With the assistance of their joint-service partners, the tents were placed on flooring designed to reduce future mold issues.

The new passenger terminal helped improve the 370th AEAG’s daily facilitation of large passenger movements for both rotary and fixed wing aircraft in support of CJTF-OIR.

The new vehicle maintenance facility improved efficiency for maintainers as they can not only get out of the sun to work on their vehicles, but also complete tasks during all hours of the day.

In order for the compound’s expansion to take place, the power grid needed to be upgraded.

“Staff Sgt. Benton took the lead on expanding the power grid,” said Tenebruso. “He is an AGE guy used to working on flightline equipment, but here he is working on power production and distribution. Thanks to his capabilities we are now almost as close to uninterrupted power as possible, which make our operations much more sustainable.”

Staff Sgt. Shawn Benton, an aerospace ground equipment craftsman, as well as the other maintenance personnel, often work outside of their scope to assist with facility upgrades and sustainment at Q-West.

“We want to make this the best place that we can for future rotations,” said Tenebruso. “Everyone here is under the mentality that we leave this place better than we found it and make it so the next rotation does not have the issues we did. Things are very different than when we first got here.”

Initially, there was not a cargo grid yard for the 442nd Air Expeditionary Squadron’s aerial port function, but aerial porters worked with the Army to procure Hesco barriers and enclose a 32,000 square-foot grid yard to secure its assets.

With limited resources, aerial porters scrounged up supplies from around the base to create a gate for the cargo yard and a flag pole out of reconstituted metal. The flag pole, which the entire aerial port team helped place in the ground, is the tallest flag pole on the base, Master Sgt. Cliff Robertson, the 442nd AES aerial port superintendent, proudly stated.

Another proud achievement of the Q-West Airmen is their “Iron Paradise” makeshift gym. According to Tenebruso, prior to their arrival there was just a wooden bench and a bar with chains duct taped to it that weighed in at a standard 135 pounds. The air advisors built a makeshift squat rack and preacher curl bench and acquired more weights, creating an area often filled with Air Force and Army personnel trying to maintain physical fitness in their austere location.

“I am amazed at how well this team has come together to improve the FOB’s conditions since they got here,” said Maj. Dave Friedel, the 370th AEAG, Det. 1 commander. “They made the camp much more livable while still performing their primary advise and assist mission. It’s all about teamwork here and there are a lot of people working well outside their expertise level to make things happen.”

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