HomeNewsArticle Display

Remembering the F-117 Nighthawk

Four F-117A Nighthawk's perform one last flyover at the Sunset Stealth retirement ceremony at Holloman AFB, N.M., April 21, 2008. The F-117A flew under the flag of the 49th Fighter Wing at Holloman Air Force Base from 1992 to its retirement in 2008. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Colbert)

Four F-117A Nighthawk's perform one last flyover at the Sunset Stealth retirement ceremony at Holloman AFB, N.M., April 21, 2008. The F-117A flew under the flag of the 49th Fighter Wing at Holloman Air Force Base from 1992 to its retirement in 2008. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Colbert)

Retired Air Force Col. Jack Forsythe in front of the flag F-117 at Tonopah Air Force Base, Nev., after the last mission April 22, 2008. Forsythe led the four-ship formation that flew the Nighthawk to its resting place. (Courtesy photo)

Retired Air Force Col. Jack Forsythe in front of the flag F-117 at Tonopah Air Force Base, Nev., after the last mission April 22, 2008. Forsythe led the four-ship formation that flew the Nighthawk to its resting place. (Courtesy photo)

Two specially painted F-117 Nighthawks fly on one of their last missions. The F-117s were retired  in a farewell ceremony at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, April 22, 2008. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Master Sgt. Kim Frey)

Two specially painted F-117 Nighthawks fly on one of their last missions. The F-117s were retired in a farewell ceremony at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, April 22, 2008. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Master Sgt. Kim Frey)

Retired Col. Jack Forsythe poses for a photo inside his home in Alexandria, Va., April 13, 2018. Forsythe flew the final sortie of the F-117 Nighthawk. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

Retired Col. Jack Forsythe poses for a photo inside his home in Alexandria, Va., April 13, 2018. Forsythe flew the final sortie of the F-117 Nighthawk. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Rusty Frank)

From left: retired Col. Jack Forsythe, Lt. Col. Mark Dinkard, 49th Operations Group deputy, Lt. Col. Todd Flesch, 8th Fighter Squadron commander, Lt. Col. Ken Tatum, 9th Fighter Squadron commander, after retiring the last four F-117s to Tonopah Air Force Base, Nev. April 22, 2008. (Courtesy photo)

From left: retired Col. Jack Forsythe, Lt. Col. Mark Dinkard, 49th Operations Group deputy, Lt. Col. Todd Flesch, 8th Fighter Squadron commander, Lt. Col. Ken Tatum, 9th Fighter Squadron commander, after retiring the last four F-117s to Tonopah Air Force Base, Nevada April 22, 2008. (Courtesy photo)

A back lit front view of an F-117 Nighthawk from Airman Magazine's February 1995 issue article "Streamlining Acquisition 101." The Lockheed F-117A was developed in response to an Air Force request for an aircraft capable of attacking high value targets without being detected by enemy radar. (Airman Magazine photo)

A back lit front view of an F-117 Nighthawk from Airman Magazine's February 1995 issue article "Streamlining Acquisition 101." The Lockheed F-117A was developed in response to an Air Force request for an aircraft capable of attacking high value targets without being detected by enemy radar. (Airman Magazine photo)

WASHINGTON (AFNS) -- It’s been 10 years since the F-117 Nighthawk retired, an aircraft so secret Nevada folklore labeled it a UFO.

The Nighthawk pilots were known by the call sign “Bandit,” each earning their number with their first solo flight. Some of the maintainers were also given a call sign, said Wayne Paddock, a former F-117 maintainer currently stationed at Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico.

“The people who maintained the coatings on the aircraft, radar absorbent material were classified as material application and repair specialists (MARS). MARS morphed into Martians,” Paddock said “MARS was a shred out from the structural repair/corrosion control career field.”

The technology for the F-117 was developed in the 1970s as a capability for attacking high value targets without being detected by enemy radar. It had up to 5,000 pounds of assorted internal stores, two engines and could travel up to 684 mph.

It was the first airplane designed and built as a low-observable, stable and therefore precise platform, said Yancy Mailes, director of the history and museums program for Air Force Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and a former F-117 maintainer.

“It was the marriage of the GBU-27 to the F-117 that had a laser designator in its nose that made it such a precise, deadly platform,” Mailes said. “It was best demonstrated during Operation Desert Storm when pilots snuck into Iraq and dropped weapons down the elevator shaft of a central communications building in Iraq.”

The first Nighthawk flew June 18, 1981, and the original F-117A unit, the 4450th Tactical Group (renamed the 37th Tactical Fighter Wing in October 1989), achieved initial operating capability in October 1983. The Nighthawk originally saw combat during Operation Just Cause in 1989, when two F-117s from the 37th TFW attacked military targets in Panama. The aircraft was also in action during Operation Desert Shield.

Retired Col. Jack Forsythe, remembers being excited when he initially flew a Nighthawk while stationed at Holloman AFB in 1995.

“It was a unique experience,” he said. “It’s probably the same feeling that a lot of our (single seat) F-22 (Raptor) and F-35 (Lightning II) pilots feel today.”

 After 25 years of service, the Nighthawk retired April 22, 2008. Forsythe led the four-ship formation to Palmdale, California, where Lockheed Martin staff said their farewells.

“We lowered the bomb doors of each aircraft and people signed their names to the doors,” Forsythe said. “It was really just kind of neat; they had designed it, built it and maintained it for these 25 years, so it really hit home – the industry and Air Force partnership that made the Nighthawk great. I think the four of us were just really struck by that and have some really great memories of that flight.”

The American flag was painted on the entire underside of his F-117 by the maintainers to help celebrate American airpower.

“I think we all recognized that this was something historic,” he said. “We retired an airplane that people still reference today. We really understood that so it was a sentimental flight to say the least. It was a great weapon system, very stable and easy to fly. It’s still a memorable experience.”

Engage

Facebook Twitter
When it comes to diagnostic imaging, doctors seek out radiology and these @341MissileWing #Airmen detect medical is… https://t.co/QUEutqdNGV
A #VietnamWar vet & #PurpleHeart recipient, discussed with @RAFMildenhall #Airmen how tragedy on the battlefield of… https://t.co/Y0uMVhAKrW
RT @andclev: .@SecAFOfficial says the @usairforce is going to have a pitch day on March 6-7, aiming to attract small, innovative businesses…
With the help of #Airmen all across the #AirForce, @TeamTyndall's munitions flight have assessed their munitions fa… https://t.co/R46vj2thnD
.@NASA Researchers came to the @AFResearchLab with a simple question. How does an electrical arc behave in a vacuum… https://t.co/GwJzzRgy8X
The Logistics Career Broadening Program, it's a little known program for company grade logistics officers that pack… https://t.co/LinlGkV6Ps
.@USArmy commends two #JTACs for their exceptional support in a no-notice joint mission. @BagramAirfieldhttps://t.co/awesogZyIR
Our thoughts are with the Airmen and their families who are affected by this loss. https://t.co/MCclu2wPZz
A sea of green, tan, cameo and shades of gray flooded @EielsonAirForce for the ultimate meeting of the minds during… https://t.co/Nlsz6JsHKv
.@NellisAFB Airfield management #Airmen attention to detail and sense of urgency keep Nellis flying.… https://t.co/MbD5EnHjV7
The initial assessment of #HurricaneMichael's aftermath was bleak, but more than a month later, the outlook has tak… https://t.co/cZBfWX8Yca
RT @DeptofDefense: Meet the Lees family. Three brothers and a sister, who have all decided to join the military. Today, Rose Lees tells us…
.@USOPM has announced Federal Benefits Open Season. Enrollment period began November 12 and runs through December 1… https://t.co/XDIVrG0GFX
U.S. military volunteers donated desks & school supplies to a Nigerian school. @USArmy #USAF #Airmen @HQUSAFEPAhttps://t.co/QScOTGS9UP
A #USAF #C130 became the first U.S. aircraft to drop #Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers on Hiju-dai drop zon… https://t.co/ErD7kQrHck