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AF pilot helps in airline emergency

Capt. Mark Gongol helped land a commercial 737 Dec. 30, 2013 when the pilot had a medical emergency. The pilot has since recovered, Gongol is a B-1B Lancer pilot and the 13th Air Support Operations Squadron assistant director of operations at Fort Carson, Colo. (Courtesy photo)

Capt. Mark Gongol helped land a commercial 737 Dec. 30, 2013, when the pilot had a medical emergency. Gongol is a B-1B Lancer pilot and the 13th Air Support Operations Squadron assistant director of operations at Fort Carson, Colo. (Courtesy photo)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. (AFNS) -- (This feature is part of the "Through Airmen's Eyes" series on AF.mil. These stories focus on a single Airman, highlighting their Air Force story.)

Most people think that during an emergency they would step up to the plate, act heroically and do what is necessary to save lives. Thinking one might rescue the day is a noble thought, but acting on those thoughts is what sets the nation's heroes above noble thinkers.

"Every pilot thinks 'what would I do if this all goes wrong' on an aircraft they are not controlling," said Capt. Mark Gongol, a B-1B Lancer pilot and the 13th Air Support Operations Squadron assistant director of operations at Fort Carson, Colorado. "As a professional courtesy, we all know the aircrew at civilian airlines are extremely qualified, but as a byproduct of being a pilot, I always have a heightened awareness when flying -- however, I never thought I would be in the situation I was in."

After spending the holidays with his family, Gongol, his wife and daughter were on their way from Des Moines International Airport, Iowa, Dec. 30, 2013, with 151 other passengers and six crewmembers.To him and his family, the day was just like any other.

Approximately 30 minutes into the flight, Gongol said he noticed the engines power down to idle. Thoughts immediately started jumping through his head. There were a variety of reasons why the engines would shut down to idle, none of them categorized as normal. Slowly, the aircraft began to descend and turn right.

"Over the public address system; a flight attendant asked if there was a doctor on board the plane," Gongol said. "A few more calls went out for medical professionals and the flight attendants were all hurrying to first class with their beverage carts and a first-aid kits."

At that moment, Gongol thought it was a medical emergency with a first class passenger, his instincts told him to stay seated and stay out of the way.

A fourth call went out, "are there any non-revenue pilots on board, please ring your call button."

Immediately, Gongol realized the pilot was the patient. He looked to his wife; as she gave him a nod, Gongol pressed his button and headed toward the flight deck.

Arriving at the flight deck, Gongol said he saw four flight attendants and two passenger nurses assembling a make-shift bed. Medical kits were strewn across the ground and the captain of the aircraft was seated in his chair, eyes dilated, sweaty, clammy and disoriented. Gongol immediately thought the pilot was suffering some serious cardiac trauma.

"After they moved the pilot, I was asked by the first officer, 'are you a pilot,' which was quickly followed with 'what do you fly,'" Gongol said. "I knew she was in a serious situation and that question gave her five seconds to judge if I would be useful. I also had about five seconds to assess her, 'was she panicking, or was she OK to fly the aircraft?' We both finished our silent assessments, she made the right judgment and told me to close the door and have a seat."

From there, Gongol said he was calm and collected, and the first officer decided that he would be most useful to talk on the radios, back her up on the aircraft's checklists and look for anything going wrong.

Having been an aircraft commander, Gongol said he is used to making decisions, but he knew the best way to get the aircraft down safely was to play a support role to the first officer and make things as normal as possible.

"She was calm, but you could tell she was a little stressed -- who wouldn't be," Gongol said. "At the beginning, I interrupted her flow of operations, but we figured everything out extremely quickly. She was very impressive."

Gongol said there were hundreds of issues the two pilots talked through on the aircraft while descending: cabin pressure, approach, contact with air traffic control, visual cues, and programming of the auto-pilot were just a few. At about 500 feet above ground level, the first officer hand-flew the approach to a normal touchdown.

After landing, the first officer turned to Gongol and asked if he knew where to taxi, she had never been to the Omaha airport before. Taken aback by how cool, calm and collected the first officer had acted without knowing the airport, Gongol remembered landing at the airport before while in pilot training.

"Surprisingly, taxiing was the most stressful part of the day for the first officer," Gongol said. "She had never taxied a 737 before and the (air traffic control) had no idea that the pilot was the reason for the emergency. We had to make a quick decision that her switching to the pilot's seat and taxiing the aircraft without the training was necessary to save the captain's life."

As the air stairs went down and the aircraft was shut down, Gongol and the first officer talked through the decisions they had just made. Gongol assured the first officer that every decision she made would be backed up by him; he would have taken the exact same actions had he been in her place.

Since the emergency the captain of the aircraft is recovering well and contacted Gongol directly to thank him.

"I saw nothing but the finest professionalism under pressure out of the flight attendants, the nurses and the first officer," Gongol said. "Everyone aboard the aircraft remained calm. There is no doubt in my mind this contributed, above all else, to our successful outcome. In my opinion, any military pilot would have done the exact same thing I did."

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