HomeNewsArticle Display

F-16s surge during two-day drill at Misawa

Airmen with the 35th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron arm an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a two-day surge exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. Along with standard maintenance to aircraft before and after flight, weapons load crew teams armed the aircraft to simulate a combat environment. During deployed operations, loading is essential for the F-16’s air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Airmen with the 35th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron arm an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a two-day surge exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. Along with standard maintenance to aircraft before and after flight, weapons load crew teams armed the aircraft to simulate a combat environment. During deployed operations, loading is essential for the F-16’s air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attacks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Senior Airman Kyle Lacy, a crew chief with the 35th Maintenance Squadron, performs a post-flight inspection on an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a surge exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. After aircraft land and return to their assigned crew chief, a post-flight inspection is conducted to ensure the aircraft didn’t accrue damage. During the two-day operation, the amount of time allotted for these inspections is decreased which heightens the tempo and simulates a combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Senior Airman Kyle Lacy, a crew chief with the 35th Maintenance Squadron, performs a post-flight inspection on an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a surge exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. After aircraft land and return to their assigned crew chief, a post-flight inspection is conducted to ensure the aircraft didn’t accrue damage. During the two-day operation, the amount of time allotted for these inspections is decreased which heightens the tempo and simulates a combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Senior Airman Bradley Poirier, a crew chief with the 35th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, inspects the intake of an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a two-day surge exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. Aircraft intakes are checked for appearance of foreign object debris or damaged blades during post-flight inspections. Protective suits are worn to increase maneuverability and prevent damage to the intake. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Senior Airman Bradley Poirier, a crew chief with the 35th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, inspects the intake of an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a two-day surge exercise at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. Aircraft intakes are checked for appearance of foreign object debris or damaged blades during post-flight inspections. Protective suits are worn to increase maneuverability and prevent damage to the intake. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Senior Airman Kyle Lacy, a crew chief with the 35th Maintenance Squadron, places probe covers on an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a surge operation at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. Crew chiefs perform post-flight inspections to ensure the F-16 remains capable of performing suppression of enemy air defense tactics. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

Senior Airman Kyle Lacy, a crew chief with the 35th Maintenance Squadron, places probe covers on an F-16 Fighting Falcon during a surge operation at Misawa Air Base, Japan, April 5, 2016. Crew chiefs perform post-flight inspections to ensure the F-16 remains capable of performing suppression of enemy air defense tactics. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Jordyn Fetter)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan (AFNS) -- Airmen with the 35th Fighter Wing conducted a two-day surge exercise April 4-5 with F-16 Fighting Falcons at Misawa Air Base.

"During surge operations, we're validating our wing's ability to generate (aircraft) in a simulated combat scenario," said Capt. Josh Plocinski, the 14th Fighter Squadron chief of standardization and evaluation.

For Airmen and pilots, this meant each flying squadron increased in performance from nearly 20 to about 70 missions daily.

"During surge operations our timeline is accelerated, so we'll fly with shorter turn times to simulate what we could see in a combat environment," said Master Sgt. Michael Woroniecki, the 14th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons flight chief. "Surge operations like this test our ability to meet a higher demand operations tempo."

To make this happen, 24-hour operations were put in place with personnel working 12-hour shifts. Sorties began at 8 a.m. and finished at midnight to increase preparedness and help pilots improve their flying skills in all weather conditions.

Along with the increased pace of jet generation, both the 13th and 14th Fighter Squadrons operated out of the same building to simulate a deployed environment.

"At Misawa you're not used to sharing the same space or working with different people, but you still have to make the mission happen," Plocinkski said. "It takes more planning and coordination than we would normally do on a day-to-day basis."

As scenarios were carried out, data was gathered to determine the success of the surge exercise.

"After action reports are completed by gathering input of what worked and didn't work, and how the missions themselves went," Plocinski explained. "We then take those lessons and apply them the next time we do this."

Exercises like these are held when wing leadership determines it's necessary to sharpen proficiency in aircraft maintenance resiliency and operational agility. Plocinski said they enhance the wing's ability to effectively and efficiently generate F-16s and remain combat ready.

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @thejointstaff: #DYK today marks the 70th anniversary of the Chairmanship? Watch recently discovered footage from the historic swearing…
This week really flew by fast. Be sure to #Follow, #Like & #RT our @AFThunderbirds for more info on the premiere a… https://t.co/5BM8N7sZTR
RT @AFSpace: Chief Towberman, AFSPC Command Chief, knows the importance of recharging, and implements it in his work-life balance. @AF_SMC
RT @AETCommand: What happened in #LasVegas...will help foster a culture of collaboration & innovation in the #USAF: the July 23 @AFWERX Fus…
RT @GenDaveGoldfein: It was absolutely impressive getting a first-hand look at the mission and innovative efforts of the 15th Wing’s Sky Wa…
.@EielsonAirForce Red Flag-Alaska is a series of @PACAF commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. & part… https://t.co/0bKkyvsVf9
RT @US_Stratcom: #24/7 #AlwaysReady 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron #Airmen work together to #GetErDone. #CombatReadyForc
RT @DeptofDefense: Cockpit view. Press ▶️ to ride along with the crew of an F-15 Strike Eagle from RAF Lakenheath, England 🇬🇧. The @48Figh
Exercise Agile Lightning concludes after showcasing agile operations essential to the defense of U.S. assets and p… https://t.co/vVR32kvtaP
What innovative way would you like to ease your job and the jobs of other Airmen? #InnovativeAF #USAFhttps://t.co/fKqcPisybt
RT @HAFB: Workers at #HillAFB recently installed the last of 173 new wings on A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft, finalizing a project that began…
RT @AFWERX: HAPPENING NOW: We're hosting the first-ever @usairforce #SparkCollider. Tune in live: https://t.co/gTKMNPM9fK https://t.co/xIlJ…
RT @EdwardsAFB: Fix these broken wings – part fabrication saves Air Force time, money - https://t.co/UCvLQ0fAqy #ForTheWarfighter #TheCente
RT @GenDaveGoldfein: I don't have a solution. There is no checklist. I just know finding the answers starts with listening to our Airmen. L…
#USAF's visit to the #MotorCity is almost here. Listen in as this hometown #Airman shares her experience growing up… https://t.co/h9aeMYwOhR
RT @seattletimes: Dorothy Olsen, of University Place, was one of the members of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs), the long-unrecog…
RT @374AirliftWing: The presence of U.S. military intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance personnel and assets further contributes t…