NATO Air Policing operations

U.S. Air Force News

  • Wartime medical innovation saves lives at home

    In January, the Food and Drug Administration approved the REBOA catheter, or resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta. The REBOA is a device that’s inserted into a hemorrhaging vessel and stops or slows blood flow to that injury, while allowing blood flow to continue to other body

  • TRICARE offers relief for spring allergies

    The weather is finally warming and we can spend more time outdoors. Unfortunately for some, warm weather brings suffering from seasonal allergies. However, there is hope. TRICARE covers proven services and supplies needed to diagnose and treat allergies.

  • Sleep is serious: Catch your Zzzs

    “Beep. Beep. Beep,” the alarm blares. Time to get up. Do you hit snooze? On average, we spend 33 percent of our lives asleep. When assessing your overall health, have you considered your sleep habits?

  • Fairchild Airman named Red Cross Hometown Hero

    Master Sgt. Stephanie Horn, the health services manager for the 92nd Medical Group, was recognized as an American Red Cross Hometown Hero Feb. 26 by the American Red Cross Association for her lifesaving actions in January 2015 in Spokane, Washington.

  • Air Force Medical Service’s Year in Review

    In 2015, the doctors, nurses and technicians of the Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) made a difference in the Air Force’s mission, while new AFMS technologies and training exercises ensured air and space superiority.

  • SMART program keeps medics ready for any contingency

    Military medical professionals have to always be ready for war and for whatever contingency the future brings. They need to either improve or remain current in medical skills necessary for any future battlefield, with its host of wounds and injuries, and for humanitarian assistance or disaster

  • Overseas members entitled to stateside care

    Overseas military families may face a problem when they return home to the United States for the holidays. Service members and their families enrolled in the TRICARE Overseas Program (TOP) or TOP Prime Remote are entitled to visit hospitals and clinics stateside and receive the same priority

  • Physical therapy Airmen provide healing touch

    With today's Air Force being the smallest it has ever been, mitigating lost days due to injury is of the utmost importance. Seeing a range of injuries from wrist pain to post-surgery recovery, the 4th Medical Operations Squadron’s physical therapy technicians aim to get their patients back to good

  • Air Force revamping flight, operational medicine

    The Air Force Medical Service is restructuring flight and operational medicine by separating primary care and occupational medicine services into two distinct clinics, with the goal of improving care and creating more efficient and patient-centered workflows.

  • MiCARE provides faster care

    Capt. Jennifer Varney likes to come to work early. As a family nurse practitioner and family health flight commander at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, she arrives at the base’s Family Health Clinic around 5 a.m. and checks the MiCARE site for any overnight patient emails.

  • Women’s health: Take time to get checked

    Each October during Breast Cancer Awareness Month, women are reminded to put themselves first and make time for their health. Making health a priority helps people stay in optimum shape and keeps illnesses and disease at bay.

  • TRICARE Online and MiCare have similarities, differences

    TRICARE Online and MiCare Secure Messaging may seem to offer the same services, but there are important differences to these software tools, which are designed to enhance access to care for all military beneficiaries.

  • Men’s Health Month

    Each June, a congressional health education program is promoted to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys.

  • Supplements: Awareness is a serious matter

    Health, fitness and energy are important considerations for all Airmen, but when does pursuing them result in potential and real problems Supplements, health foods and energy drinks may be popular and even come with approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, but that doesn't ensure compliance

  • AF's updated policy further promotes tobacco-free environments

    The Air Force has led the military in advancing innovative tobacco control policies, such as the tobacco-free medical campus and prohibiting tobacco use outside "designated tobacco areas." Now, an updated Air Force instruction, published in March, seeks to further reduce health impacts from smoking,

  • ‘Super’ Airman becomes professional bodybuilder

    After a heavy weight workout, Senior Airman Terrence Ruffin walks over to a row of mirrors in the gym posing and flexing his muscles for more than half an hour. This behavior isn't an overabundance of ego or vanity, but a critical part of the training routine for Ruffin, a professional bodybuilder.

  • Reservist celebrates 6 years of cancer remission

    When her husband threatened to take her to the emergency room, she made an appointment with a cardiologist and later had her blood drawn. An urgent call from the doctor later sent her to the emergency room, where she was as stunned as everyone else with the diagnosis -- Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

  • Reserve Airmen support Ebola fight on the ground

    About 15 air transportation specialists from the 446th Airlift Wing here are scheduled to depart for Dakar, Senegal, Nov. 8, to support ground personnel for the campaign against Ebola during Operation Unified Assistance.

  • Prevention is the best medicine for enterovirus D-68

    With recent cases of the respiratory illness enterovirus D-68 being reported in multiple states within the U.S., doctors want to ensure all the members of the military community are informed and safe when confronting this illness.

  • Drug misuse, abuse: No excuse

    While picking up an over-the-counter medication at the local drug store or being prescribed medication by a healthcare provider are common practices for Airmen looking to get or remain healthy, misuse or abuse of any drug can be a serious problem with serious consequences.

  • Airmen asked to participate in DOD anti-tobacco video competition

    The Department of Defense, Health Affairs, has recently announced a new countermarketing video competition that aims to target tobacco as an enemy of the military that degrades service members' health, fitness, mission readiness and work productivity. The competition entitled, "Fight the Enemy,"

  • Changes to BE WELL mean more choices for Airmen

    The BE WELL program, an Air Force-wide program designed to provide Airmen and Air Force leaders with resources to optimize fitness and health, now offers more choices and increased flexibility, thanks to a revamp that went into effect July 1.The Balanced Eating, Work Out Effectively, Living Longer,

  • TRICARE moves forward with prime service area reductions

    Defense Department officials will reduce the number of TRICARE Prime service areas in the United States beginning Oct. 1, affecting about 171,000 retirees and their family members. Those beneficiaries, who mostly reside more than 40 miles from a military clinic or hospital, received a letter earlier