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U.S. Air Force News

  • Deployment provides reservist teacher valuable experience for classroom

    Master Sgt. Jason Paseur, currently deployed in Southwest Asia as the 386th Air Expeditionary Wing historian, is always on the hunt for creative lessons for the classroom where he teaches as a civilian. Paseur is a reservist deployed from the 94th Airlift Wing out of Dobbins Air Reserve Base,

  • Scott AFB celebrates century of service

    Located in the heartland of America, Scott Air Force Base marked the historic milestone with a kickoff celebration Jan. 7 that helped launch a yearlong effort to honor its heritage, thank its mission and community partners and posture the installation for the next 100 years.

  • Archaeologists discover proof of wetlands, ancient life on Utah range

    A team of archaeologists recently working on the Utah Test and Training Range under the direction of the Hill Air Force Base Cultural Resource Program discovered a 12,300-year-old hearth -- an archaeological "feature" -- and artifacts, which tell the story of North America's earliest inhabitants and

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: Apollo 15

    Manned by an all-Air Force crew, the Apollo 15 mission was considered a great success. It was the fourth time man had landed on the moon.

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: AF museum opens new building

    The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, is showing off its brand new hangar full of historical aircraft and tons of Air Force history. It features four sections: presidential, research and development, space, and global reach.

  • Documenting a tragedy: Global Strike historian recalls Khobar Towers

    Yancy Mailes, the Air Force Global Strike Command historian, was a 27-year-old staff sergeant at the time. It was June 25, 1996, and he had been the wing’s historian for three months. With little training and less experience, he found himself as one of the key contributors to documenting the tragedy

  • Hanscom historian captures share of Air Force-level award

    Hanscom Air Force Base historian Randy Bergeron has earned a share of the Dennis F. Casey Award for Excellence in Periodic History in the Albert S. Simpson Category for co-authoring the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center's periodic history last year.

  • Yesterday's Air Force: Daniel "Chappie" James Jr.

    Daniel “Chappie” James Jr. was the Air Force’s first African-American four-star general. He trained Tuskegee Airmen and even faced former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi at Wheelus Air Force Base, Libya.

  • Desert Storm: 2nd Bomb Wing leads the air war

    In the early morning of Jan. 16, 1991, the 2nd Bomb Wing deployed seven B-52G Stratofortresses and crews to Iraq in a single, secret mission that would mark the beginning of Operation Desert Storm.

  • AFSOC historian retires after 50-plus years of service

    The longest-serving historian in the Air Force retired at Hurlburt Field Jan. 7. Herb Mason, the Air Force Special Operations Command historian, spent more than 50 years preserving the Air Force story for generations to come.

  • Veterans in Blue: honoring those who served

    The Air Force maintains a special portrait display in the Pentagon as part of its commitment to honoring the devotion and service of veterans. Volume VI will replace volume V of the Veterans in Blue project this November.

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: The B-36

    After World War II the threat of nuclear weapons was felt by every man, woman and child in the country. America knew it needed a platform to help deter a nuclear strike, and the solution was the B-36 Peacemaker.

  • Tuskegee Airman takes final flight at Academy

    Franklin Macon joined the Army Air Corps in 1943 after the creation of the Tuskegee program allowed African-Americans to fill military pilot positions, which were previously occupied exclusively by whites. On Aug. 26 at the age of 92, Macon sat on the airfield at the U.S. Air Force Academy, waiting

  • Yesterday’s Air Force: The Enola Gay

    The thought of using a nuclear weapon is a heavy one, and when the first nuclear bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, it sparked conversations all over the world. What does it mean to have nuclear power? How should it be used? All this started with one aircraft: the Enola Gay.

  • Doolittle Raiders share Congressional Gold Medal with the world

    On April 18, 1942, 80 men inspired a nation by flying 16 B-25 bombers off the deck of the USS Hornet and dropping ordnance on Tokyo. Now, 73 years later, Congress honored these men with the Congressional Gold Medal, presented to the Raiders in Washington D.C., April 15.

  • Challenge coins: A tradition of excellence

    Throughout the time we spend in the military, we collect many things. Whether they are mementos, awards or habits, such items are kept to remember those special moments we never wish to forget. Challenge coins are an example of these memories, as they are a form of recognition of the hard work and

  • Blake paved way for thousands of Air Force women

    At the first available opportunity to return to her roots, Staff Sgt. Esther Blake transferred from the Army to the Air Force on July 8, 1948, minutes after the start of the first duty day for the WAF, along with 11 other women at Fort McPherson, near Atlanta. She remained on active duty with the