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U.S. Air Force News

  • Tuskegee Airman reflects on diversity

    It was 1944 and the U.S. was in the midst of two battles -- a war on two sides of the world and the onslaught of cultural changes on the homefront. Meanwhile, a young African-American Soldier picked up trash on the white sandy beaches at Keesler Field, Mississippi. He had been briefed that although

  • Tuskegee Airmen share life lessons

    Three members of the famed Tuskegee Airmen visited with Airmen at the Pentagon during a meet and greet hosted by Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James Feb. 16. Retired Col. Charles McGee and former Cadets William Fauntroy Jr. and Walter Robinson Sr. shared stories and insights about their lives as

  • Tuskegee Airman takes final flight at Academy

    Franklin Macon joined the Army Air Corps in 1943 after the creation of the Tuskegee program allowed African-Americans to fill military pilot positions, which were previously occupied exclusively by whites. On Aug. 26 at the age of 92, Macon sat on the airfield at the U.S. Air Force Academy, waiting

  • Training at Tuskegee: Turning dreams into reality

    Training young men to be the first African American pilots in the military was a history-making event for the handful of trainers and leaders at the Tuskegee Institute. Creating an airfield from the ground up, the "Tuskegee experiment" led the way for desegregation of the military less than a decade

  • Black Airmen turn racism, bigotry into opportunity

    On a hot July day in 1941 on a desolate field in Tuskegee, Ala.,, 13 young African-American Airmen began an experiment by senior Army leaders to teach them how to become pilots. That experiment turned into the ultimate opportunity for these young men to become a valued part of the military and would