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Default Air Force Logo A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty.
0 7/10
2018
PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. - Staff Sgt. Jacqueline Jauregui, Air Force Space Command enlisted aid to the deputy commander, poses for a photo at the 21st Space Wing portrait studio at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, June 20, 2018. Jauregui made a life decision in 2008 to separate herself from Crip gang activity and joined the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Robb Lingley Determined to make a better life
Growing up in Gilroy, California, she had everything a girl could wish for: money, designer clothes and so much more. Shortly after high school graduation, her father took everything from her and kicked her to the streets.
0 6/29
2018
Many Airman are unaware what the initial meeting with a mental health provider looks like when they seek PTSD treatment. The goal of the first meeting is to make the patient feel comfortable and to be as transparent as possible about what is going on and what treatment options the patient has. As a result, the patient and mental health provider will more likely have a collaborative and trusting interaction, making PTSD treatment more successful. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care
Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect.
0 6/28
2018
Default Air Force Logo Check your ego at the door, be your own advocate
Master Sgt. James Stalnaker always thought going to mental health was a deal breaker for your career; that mental issues make you a weaker person. It took encountering struggles of his own to change those views.
0 5/14
2018
Default Air Force Logo Puerto Rico Air Guard plane crash victims identified
The Puerto Rico National Guard has released the names of the victims of the WC-130 Hercules aircraft accident, which occurred May 2, 2018, near Hilton Head Airport in Savannah, Georgia.
0 5/03
2018
Honor Guardsman poses Strength in recovery: victim becomes advocate
It was not the 21st birthday she was expecting. She got off of work at midnight, and her coworker asked her if she wanted to celebrate. Tired, but still wanting to have some fun, she agreed.
0 4/27
2018
The 386th Expeditionary Medical Group, with support from the 386th Expeditionary Operation Group, expanded mental health services to Airmen at an undisclosed location supporting ongoing operations in Syria, Oct. 24 and 25. Mental health expands services, reaches more Airmen
The 386th Expeditionary Medical Group, with support from the 386th Expeditionary Operation Group, expanded mental health services recently to Airmen at an undisclosed location supporting ongoing operations in Syria.
0 11/09
2017
Default Air Force Logo Be there, be aware: Help prevent suicide
When we focus on our health, it’s easy to pay attention to physical health versus mental well-being. Ignoring mental health concerns like anxiety and depression can lead to worsening symptoms and more serious issues. For some people, these issues may include an increased risk of suicide.
0 9/29
2017
Tech. Sgt. Stevi Smalts Airman overcomes suicidal thoughts, strives to help others
Being part of the Air Force is not an easy task. Airmen are charged with supporting and defending the U.S. from all enemies, foreign and domestic. As a result, the military life has many stressors and responsibilities. Deployments, financial strains, intensive training, long work days and adapting to new austere environments are a few examples of the hardships some Airmen face.
0 9/15
2017
Jackson Parnell joins his mother, Brandy Parnell, in a cool-down stretch during the first Mommy and Me Yoga class Aug. 29, 2016, at Ramstein Air Base, Germany. The instructor incorporated nontraditional names for poses to keep the young children more engaged, as well as created an environment to promote a deeper mother-to-child bond. (U.S. Air Force 
photo/ Airman 1st Class Savannah L. Waters)
Healthy Aging Awareness Month: Improving the health of older adults
Health plays a huge part in how we experience life, and determining current health situations can help lead to a longer and happier life. But what about healthy aging?
0 9/08
2017
Suicide Prevention Month graphic Suicide prevention month: stopping suicide is everyone’s battle
September is Suicide Prevention Month, a time for Americans to build awareness and help understand suicide in our culture. More than 40,000 Americans lose their life due to suicide each year and research shows that rates in the military and the general population are very close. The loss of anyone to suicide is a tragedy, and that is why the Air Force is committed to the goal of zero suicides.
0 9/07
2017
New annual Mental Health Assessment requirement began July 31, 2017. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Steve Thompson) New annual Mental Health Assessment requirement begins July 31
Beginning July 31, 2017, Airmen undergoing their annual Periodic Health Assessment may notice something new. A Mental Health Assessment will now be part of every annual PHA, to help ensure Airmen suffering from undiagnosed mental health issues are referred to the necessary care.
0 7/20
2017
Tech. Sgt. Christopher D’Angelo, right, a 490th Missile Squadron missile alert facility manager at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., poses for a photo with his wife, Chanda, son, Jace and daughter, Brittyn at their home in Great Falls, Mont., June 7, 2017. D’Angelo was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder after he was injured by an improvised explosive device Jan. 15, 2008. He said his wife has been very supportive with helping him cope with his PTSD. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Chad Thompson) Healing from invisible wounds: The other side of the story
Chanda D’Angelo was in a frenzy; she quickly washed all the clothes in her home, zoomed the vacuum across every floor, wiped down every surface, cleaned out the refrigerator and stove and scrubbed the windows and mirrors until they were spotless. Exhausted, she had just enough time to get her hair and nails done – everything had to be perfect for her husband’s return.
0 6/28
2017
Default Air Force Logo PTSD treatment confronts the trauma behind the disorder
Post-traumatic stress disorder is considered one of the “signature wounds” of the current conflicts in the Middle East. But many people may not know that there are highly effective treatments for this invisible wound being deployed at Air Force hospitals and clinics today.
0 6/22
2017
Default Air Force Logo Connection saves lives: Be there to help prevent suicide
You can make a difference for someone struggling with suicidal thoughts with as little as eye contact and a friendly smile, an arm around the shoulder, or a kind word at the right time.
0 6/21
2017
Senior Airman Kevin Angelesco, a fire fighter assigned to the 386th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron (left) supervises Staff Sgt. Jessica Moore, a mental health technician with the 386th Medical Group as she learns how to control a fire hose during a mental health unit familiarization visit at an undisclosed location in southwest Asia, May 30, 2017. Angelesco is a reservist deployed from the 940th Civil Engineer Squadron, Beale Air Force Base, Calif.(U.S. Air Force Photo/Master Sgt. Eric M. Sharman) 386 AEW mental health team builds bonds, shatters stigmas
It can start with a simple conversation. “How are you?” “Yeah, I bet you see some crazy stuff at your job.” “That must have been really hard for you to process.” What at first seems like a run-of-the-mill conversation, stemming from a friendly visit, is more than meets the eye. It is a check-in. It is non-invasive, and it is from a friendly face that is just there to learn more about what Airmen do, and ask how they were. It’s the art of human engagement, and it is practiced by the 386th Expeditionary Medical Group mental health staff.
0 6/19
2017
Default Air Force Logo Around the Air Force: May 19
On this look around the Air Force, the F-35 Lightning II pilot minimum weight restriction has been lifted and May is Mental Health Awareness Month.
0 5/19
2017
May is mental health month, and mental health disorders are common in both military and civilian communities. Fortunately, effective treatments exist for most mental health disorders. Often, the biggest impediment to getting better is an unwillingness to seek care. Don’t suffer alone – mental health disorders have effective treatments
Mental health disorders are relatively common within civilian and military communities, but with early treatment, most mental health disorders can be effectively treated, and patients can return to mental wellness.
0 5/14
2017
Tech. Sgt. Terrance Williams, the 22nd Security Forces Squadron resources NCO in charge, poses for a photo March 28, 2017, at McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. Since he began his recovery from depression, anxiety, alcoholism, post-traumatic stress disorder and a suicide attempt, Williams wants to help other people who are facing similar obstacles. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Erin McClellan) A journey of resiliency: Healing the wounds that can’t be seen
Nine deployments, severe depression, anxiety and alcoholism, post-traumatic stress disorder and a suicide attempt were what drove one McConnell Airman to begin a journey to reshape his life.
0 3/30
2017
Default Air Force Logo Comprehensive Airman Fitness: Mental stability
For a machine to function properly, the screws must be set, balance maintained and gaskets must be in good repair. Maybe that’s why mental instability is often characterized as having a loose screw, being out of balance or blowing a gasket. Recognized as one of the four domains of Comprehensive Airman Fitness, the Air Force describes mental wellness as “the ability to effectively cope with unique mental stressors and challenges needed to ensure mission readiness.”
0 3/01
2017
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