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Wing prepares for CV-22 training

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. -- This full-motion CV-22 simulator is one of four that 58th Special Operations Wing instructors here will use to train aircrews beginning in 2005.  The wing is scheduled to receive the new aircraft in 2006.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Ronald Williams)

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. -- This full-motion CV-22 simulator is one of four that 58th Special Operations Wing instructors here will use to train aircrews beginning in 2005. The wing is scheduled to receive the new aircraft in 2006. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Ronald Williams)

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. (AFPN) -- With two CV-22 simulators on board here, 58th Special Operations Wing workers are making strides toward setting up training for the new aircraft.

The Air Force officially accepted ownership of its first full-motion CV-22 simulator at the 58th Training Squadron recently.

The unit will receive four simulators for CV-22 pilot and flight engineer training.

The simulators provide day, dusk and night tactical special operations training, as well as cockpit, instrument and emergency procedures training for pilots and flight engineers. The simulators feature a state-of-the-art visual system and a realistic training database to mimic the aircraft's capabilities in all weather and terrain conditions.

The tilt-rotor aircraft has special terrain-following equipment allowing it to penetrate deep into enemy territory in adverse weather.

"A great deal of CV-22 flight training will be accomplished (in) the simulator, so it's very important the CV-22 simulator performs as realistically as possible," said Lt. Col. Joseph Maguire, 58th TRS operations officer.

The simulators will be networked to other Air Force simulators throughout the country and allow aircrews to train in various combat scenarios.

Unlike other simulators at the formal schoolhouse, the instructor-operator station can be accessed from one of the front seats.

"This is an important feature which reduces manpower costs, since only one instructor is needed to fully operate the simulator," said Lt. Col. Joe Falzone, the CV-22 Aircrew Training Devices Program manager. "The additional touch-screen panel allows the instructor to fly the simulator from the front seat and still have access to all simulator mission functions.

"These state-of-the-art simulators will greatly and dramatically improve the way we train combat-ready aircrews for Air Force Special Operations Command," Falzone said.

The simulator costs one-fourth that of an actual CV-22 aircraft and is less expensive to operate per hour -- about only 10 percent of the aircraft flying-hour costs.

"We anticipate using the simulators for up to 70 percent of the total training with a much higher reliability rate since we are in a controlled environment and not at the mercy of weather and maintenance or other delays due to limited parts availability," said Falzone.

CV-22 maintenance workers will be trained at Marine Corps Air Station New River, N.C.

For now, the simulator is being used to train instructor aircrews and validate the courseware needed for student training.

"The CV-22 simulator is a quantum leap in technology for the 58th SOW and will be a force-multiplier once the CV-22 weapon system becomes operational in the Air Force," said Lt. Col. J.J. Simon, 58th TRS commander. (Courtesy Air Education and Training Command News Service)

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