HomeNewsArticle Display

Kwast salutes AETC team for "failing forward" in learning, innovation

U.S. Air Force Lt.  Gen. Steven Kwast, commander of Air Education and Training Command, officially addresses the men and women of the First Command for the first time as their commander during a change of command ceremony Nov. 16, 2017, at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas. Kwast, a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate, will pass command of AETC to Lt. Gen. Brad Webb July 26, 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Sean Worrell)

Lt. Gen. Steven Kwast, commander of Air Education and Training Command, officially addresses the men and women of the AETC for the first time as their commander during a change of command ceremony Nov. 16, 2017, at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas. Kwast, a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate, will pass command of AETC to Lt. Gen. Brad Webb July 26, 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo by Sean Worrell)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Steven Kwast, commander of Air Education and Training Command, meets with an Airman assigned to the 56th Fighter Wing at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona during a visit July 20, 2018.  Kwast, a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate, will pass command of AETC to Lt. Gen. Brad Webb July 26, 2019. (U.S. Air Force photo / Courtesy)

U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Steven Kwast, commander of Air Education and Training Command, meets with an Airman assigned to the 56th Fighter Wing at Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., during a visit July 20, 2018. Kwast, a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate, will pass command of AETC to Lt. Gen. Brad Webb July 26, 2019. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-RANDOLPH, Texas (AFNS) --

In the nearly two years since Lt. Gen. Steve Kwast took command of Air Education and Training Command, there has been change across many fronts of the Air Force’s recruiting, training and education enterprise.

As he prepares to pass leadership of the command to Lt. Gen. Brad Webb, July 26, Kwast expressed gratitude to the men and women of AETC who have found ways to “reimagine” the way they developed more lethal and ready Airmen, from breaking long-held, industrial age paradigms to further developing a world-class culture of innovation to develop better ways of accomplishing the mission.

In discussing what has stuck out to him in his time as the commander, Kwast was grateful to the command’s Airmen for understanding the need to change processes to keep pace with near-peer adversaries in today’s dynamic national security environment.

“I’ll start with the gratitude that this command was willing to explore transforming the way we recruit, train and educate to be able to compete against great powers in the 21st century that want their values in this world,” Kwast said.

One of the major focus areas for Kwast upon taking the reins of AETC centered on finding out how Airmen learn best and how to implement a learner-centric training environment across the command.

“The way we learn right now was a design that we’ve been living with since the 1930s, and we haven’t really changed, so we can’t learn as fast or as deeply as we could,” the general said. “This command has embraced the exploration of how we learn more rapidly and more competently than any other Air Force on planet earth, and that I’m grateful for, because change is hard.”

In order to focus on finding ways to help Airmen learn more efficiently, one of the major changes that happened over the last two years was the initiative to change the organizational structure of the AETC headquarters, empowering numbered air force commanders and better aligning decision-making where the mission execution happens, Kwast said.

“The time it takes to repurpose the manpower, to repurpose the skill sets and the talent required to do this work takes years,” Kwast said. “We are on the journey; we are not at the destination yet. But as the great saying goes, the joy is in the journey, not the destination.”

While discussing how AETC is breaking long-held industrial age paradigms, Kwast expounded on the benefits of the individualization of learning, comparing it to a garden where the seeds have just broken above ground and what can be accomplished when students control learning and its timetable.

“All of these things are just now starting to take root, and we have not yet even begun to see the power of what this will mean for a force that can be lethal and ready and adapt to any enemy and solve problems more creatively than we have since our inception as an Air Force,” he said.

Developing a world-class culture of innovation, which is now the cornerstone of how AETC does business, has meant a free flow of ideas across the command, such as those at Pilot Training Next. The general understands that failing forward is part of the process of being positioned to better develop Mach-21 Airmen.

“It’s fun to see how creative and useful the ideas are that come from these people that have been given freedom to try,” Kwast said. “We talk a lot about the price of adaptation is failure. You have to stumble a bit to find out what works. The same is true here.”

“If you talk to somebody that was outside of this command that visited in November 2017, and who now comes back and visits, it’s jaw-dropping,” he continued. “It’s a transformational change from learning in a linear way, which we did in the industrial age, and it is going to be the key to successfully innovating and adapting at the speed of the 21st century.”

Kwast also spoke to how change is ever-present, his excitement for the future of AETC and his last challenge to the men and women of the command.

“I am very happy and very excited about where this command is going because it’s not about any individual person, it’s about the progress of relevant people who stayed perpetually useful to the Air Force,” Kwast said. “My challenge to them and my battle cry is the same as it was when I took command. Change is the only constant, and change will continue to accelerate in our lifetime, so tap into this young generation because they’re more capable of change than we give them credit for.”

In terms of being a lifelong learner, the general was adamant about hunger being mandatory for Airmen.

“Stay hungry…if you are not an aggressive learner that intentionally jumps out of your comfort zone to discover, and if you are not a person that enjoys the fear of the unknown and enjoys being a prudent risk-taker, then you don’t belong in this uniform, you don’t belong in this age,” Kwast said. “We are moving into a season of history where America will be tested like it hasn’t been in the lifetime of anybody that is sitting in these seats right now. If you are not comfortable with change and with conflict and with chaos, and if you are not systemic and holistic in the way you think about problem-solving in the way you lead diverse teams of people to be humbly learning new things that you have never understood before, then you will not succeed.”

As Kwast prepares to hand the guidon over to Webb, he reflected on meaningful work and its impact on the country, as well as his future.

“There is nothing more profoundly meaningful than living in times where your hard work does more to help our freedoms,” he said. ”It’s with a great sense of joy and enthusiasm that I hand the mantle to (Lt. Gen.) Brad Webb. I’m very excited, very hopeful, and I will be a part of this nation’s journey forward. I promise you that.”

Engage

Facebook Twitter
RT @AFResearchLab: Our 711th Human Performance Wing is studying Airmen's sleeping habits to improve performance and readiness to further th…
.@NellisAFB Airmen help prep an @AusAirForce C-17 Globemaster III to receive fire suppressant needed to aid in the… https://t.co/fRiXN5lNh0
RT @USSOCOM: SOF Truth III: Special Operations Forces cannot be mass produced. It takes years to train operational units to the level of pr…
Comptrollers from @TeamTyndall received the Gen. Larry O. Spencer Special Acts and Services Award for assisting mor… https://t.co/TIclfKmU2B
RT @F22DemoTeam: Everyone has a history. Some have a legacy. We are excited to introduce Maj. Joshua ‘Cabo’ Gunderson, commander and pilot…
A KC-135 and three F-16s from @EdwardsAFB conduct a flyover above @levisstadium during the #NFCChampionship. Fly… https://t.co/0K7GcYO1Ia
RT @AirNatlGuard: "We can always count on the training, professionalism and drive of every Airmen at the @176thWing and the Alaska Rescue C…
RT @LukeAFB: Starting the week off with a F-16 slow-mo! ✈ #slowmomonday #aviation #jets #f16 #fighterjet #usaf #sunrise https://t.co/toXXl…
RT @AETCommand: Airmen from the 29th AMU check over the first MQ-9 Reaper to be transported through ferry flight, Jan. 8, 2020, on @Holloma
RT @DeptofDefense: The cold won’t slow down the @usairforce! The Air Force is working with the @usarmyccdc to test cold weather gear and e…
RT @USAFCENT: GROUND SUPPORT | USAF Airmen assigned to the 379th AEMS worked alongside the 746th EAS to load cargo onto & launch a C-130 at…
RT @USAFHealth: #DidYouKnow, Air Force Expeditionary Medicine brings leading-edge medicine directly into battle providing injured personnel…
As he served, let us serve. Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day. https://t.co/SuE0D4UAnI
RT @AirNatlGuard: "We talk about lining ourselves up with our sister services and joint efforts to make sure we accomplish our mission; the…
RT @AFResearchLab: The year is 1947. The @usairforce officially broke the sound barrier with the Bell X-1 aircraft. This incredible feat w…
RT @theF35JPO: Congratulations to the @AusAirForce for completing their #F35 training mission at @LukeAFB! 🇦🇺 ⚡ Learn more 🔗 https://t.co/2…
RT @CENTCOM: A French Rafale conducts nighttime air refueling with a U.S. Air Force KC-10 Extender assigned to the 380th Air Expeditionary…
RT @DeptofDefense: Jumping from a plane becomes a big step toward friendship. 301 soldiers and airmen from @USArmyReserve, @usairforce, and…
Explosive Disposal Ordnance (EOD) Airmen are often assigned to some of the most dangerous missions and perform tact… https://t.co/xYc9Ip5psn
Start this year by supporting your #Airmen in their pursuit of #resiliency. Learn about common triggers of invisibl… https://t.co/6gJSfJKvcK